nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2018‒09‒24
146 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Climate, climate shocks and child nutrition in Africa’s diverse farming systems By Haile, B.; Azzarri, C.; Heady, D.; You, L.
  2. Farmers’ preference and willingness to pay for Ecosystem Services from Small-scale Agricultural Management Intervention Options in Burkina Faso: A Discrete Choice Experiment Approach By Houessionon, P.
  3. Monitoring agricultural productivity for sustainable production and R&D planning By Laborde Debucquet, David; Piñeiro, Valeria
  4. Measurement of technical efficiency of wine grape producers in Mendoza Argentina By Riera, S.
  5. Excessive Food Consumption in Irish Adults: Implications for Climatic Sustainability and Public Health By McCarthy, Sinéad N.; O’Rourke, Daniel; Kearney, John; McCarthy, Mary; Henchion, Maeve; Hyland, J. J.
  6. Economic Effects of Climate Change on Agriculture Productivity by 2035: A case study of Pakistan By Khan, M.A.; Tahir, A.
  7. Agricultural policy and long-run development: evidence from Mussolini's Battle for Grain By Carillo, Mario Francesco
  8. Insect Meal in the Fish Diet and Feeding Cost: First Economic Simulations on European Sea bass Farming by a Case Study in Italy By Pulina, P.; Arru, B.; Madau, F.A.; Furesi, R.; Gasco, L.
  9. Climate Change, Agricultural Productivity and Economic Performance: an exercise using a Dynamic CGE Model By Nazareth, M.; Cunha, D.; Gurgel, A.
  10. Gender Differentiated Impacts of Commodity Price Shocks on Households’ Consumption Behavior: A Natural Experiment By Mottaleb, K.; Erenstein, O.
  11. Farmers’ Net Income Distribution and Regional Vulnerability to Climate Change: An Empirical Study of Bangladesh By Alamgir, M.S.; Furuya, J.; Kobayashi, S.; Salam, M.A.
  12. Dietary diversity of children and teenagers in Northern Vietnam By Genova, C.; Umberger, W.; Peralta, A.; Newman, S.
  13. Does climate change cause conflict? Damned if you do, damned if you don’t By Gatti, N.; Baylis, K.; Crost, B.
  14. Social capital and conservation under collective and individual incentive schemes: a framed field experiment in Indonesia By Wollni, M.; Lanza, G.; Ibanez, M.
  15. Risk Aversion And Pesticide Use: Further Insights From Prospect Theory By Carpentier, Alain
  16. Information, retail channel and consumers WTP for food safety in Argentina. By Berges, M.; Casellas, K.; Echeverria, L.; Urquiza Jozami, G.
  17. Scenarios of the Common Agricultural Policy after 2020 By Majewski, Edward; Malak-Rawlikowska, Agata
  18. What drives the withdrawal of protected areas? Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon By Derya Keles; Philippe Delacote; Alexander Pfaff
  19. Beyond mean rainfall and temperature changes: distributional effects of stochastic yield variability in the Sudan By Grethe, H.; Siddig, K.; Stepanyan, D.; Zhu, T.; Wiebelt, M.
  20. Adoption of the agri-environmental measures: The role of motivations and perceived effectiveness By Kuhmonen, Irene
  21. Application of AIDS model to analyse the farm household food demand elasticity: Evidence from panel data By Khed, V.; K.b., U.
  22. Ownership of Oil and Gas Rights: Implications for U.S. Farm Income and Wealth By Hitaj, Claudia; Weber, Jeremy; Erickson, Ken
  23. Les relations commerciales agroalimentaires de la Russie avec l’Union européenne, l’embargo russe et les productions animales By Vincent Chatellier; Thierry Pouch; Cécile Le Roy; Quentin Mathieu
  24. Nutritional Status and Dietary Diversity of Households in Vijayapura district of Karnataka By Khed, V.; V., S.
  25. What Drives Smallholders' Productivity in Pakistan's Horticultural Sector? By Shabbir Ahmad; Sriram Shankar; John Steen; Martie-Louise Verreynne; Abid Aman Burki
  26. A Review of the Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness of On-Farm BMPs for Mitigating Soil-Related GHG Emissions By Yanni, Sandra; Rajsic, Predrag; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia; Weersink, Alfons
  27. Neoclassical approach to traditional business insurance - introduction to the theory of agricultural insurance By Kulawik, Jacek
  28. Is prohibiting child labour enough? Coffee certification and child schooling in Ethiopia and Uganda By Akoyi, K.T.; Mitiku, F.; Maertens, M.
  29. Concentration of the agricultural production in the EU: the two sides of a coin By Piet, Laurent
  30. Aggregate Agricultural Extensive and Intensive Land Supply Response By Iqbal, Md Zabid; Babcock, Bruce A.
  31. Nutritional Quality of Foods Acquired by Americans: Findings From USDA's National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey By Mancino, Lisa; Guthrie, Joanne; Ver Ploeg, Michele; Lin, Biing-Hwan
  32. Agricultural Price Volatility and International Investment Decisions in the Food Processing Industry By Koné, Mankan M.; Gaigné, Carl; Tamini, Lota D.
  33. Measuring the Impact of Climate Variability on Rice and Finger Millet: Empirical Evidence from a Drought Prone Region of India By Jena, P.R.; Kalli, R.
  34. Understanding how risk preferences and social capital affect farmers’ behavior to anticipatory and reactive adaptation options to climate change: the case of vineyard farmers in central Chile By Alvarado, E.; Ibanez, M.; Brummer, B.
  35. Impact Evaluation of New Irrigation Technology in Crete: Correcting for Selectivity Bias By Vrachioli, M.; Stefanou, S.; Tzouvelekas, V.
  36. Price Transmission in the Beef Value Chain – The Case of Bloemfontein, South Africa By Ogundeji, A.; Mare, F.A.
  37. The Valuation of Ecosystem Services from Farms and Forests Informing a systematic approach to quantifying benefits of conservation programs (Synthesis Chapter) By Wainger, L.; Ervin, D.
  38. Laos consumer perceptions of rice quality and safety: Insights from a conjoint analysis By Chialue, L.; Moustier, P.
  39. The impact of market shocks on undernourishment: Evidence from Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam By Hoang, Hoa1mailto; Kimura, Shingo
  40. Trade Liberalization and Endogenous Quality Choice in Food and Agricultural Trade By Eum, Jihyun; Sheldon, Ian M.
  41. Effect of Women Empowerment in Agriculture on Food Security of Farm Households in Ogun State, Nigeria By Ogunnaike, Maria Gbemisola; Kehinde, Mojisola Olanike; Shittu, Adebayo M.
  42. Do farmers and the environment benefit from adopting IPM practices? Evidence from Kenya By Tefera, T.; Kassie, M.; Midingoyi, S.; Muriithi, B.
  43. Green Acres? Cannabis agriculture and rural land values in Northern California By Schwab, Benjamin; Butsic, Van A.
  44. Orange Fanta vs orange fruit: A novel measure of nutrition knowledge and women’s diet quality in Malawi By Schneider, K.; Masters, W.A.
  45. On the Impacts of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures on Agri-food Trade: New Evidence from Chinese Firms By Xie, Chaoping; Grant, Jason; You, Wen
  46. A comparison between GTAP-BIO and GLOBIOM for estimating biofuels induced land use change emissions By Tyner, W.; Zhao, X.; Taheripour, F.
  47. Understanding the importance of off-farm employment for rural development: Evidence from Senegal By Van Hoyweghen, K.; Van Den Broeck, G.; Maertens, M.
  48. Economies of Scope in Food Processing: the Competitive Implications for Agricultural Producers and Consumers By Xia, Tian; Li, Xianghong
  49. Has climate change driven urbanization in Africa? By Henderson, J. Vernon; Storeygard, Adam; Deichmann, Uwe
  50. Climate Change, Agriculture, and Sustainable Management of Water Resources in the Sacramento River Basin By Huang, Jiaoyuan; Shah, Farhed A.
  51. Contribution of improved processing equipment to rice value chain upgrading in West Africa: Evidence from Benin By Fiamohe, R.; Agossadou, A.J.; Kinkpe, T.
  52. Farmers’ Social Expenditures and Agricultural Productivity A state variables approach By Ulimwengu, J.; Makombe, T.
  53. Food Market Modernization and Diet-related Health Outcomes: Evidence from Urban Vietnam By Zeng, Di; Umberger, Wendy J.; Rupa, Jesmin Ara
  54. Crop Insurance Moral Hazard from Price and Weather Forecasts By Yu, Jisang; Hendricks, Nathan P.
  55. Are users of market information efficient? A stochastic production frontier model corrected by sample selection. By Kamiche Zegarra, J.; Bravo-Ureta, B.
  56. Determinants and impacts of marketing channel choice among cooperatives members: Evidence from agricultural cooperative in China By Liu, Y.
  57. Linking Agricultural Land Conservation and Provision of Ecosystem Services: A Choice Experiment Approach By Wang, Haoluan; Swallow, Brent M.
  58. The Relationship between Technical Efficiency In Food Crop Production And Household Wealth In Uganda: Evidence From Maize Farming Households between 2005- 2010 By Kalibwani, R.
  59. Impacts of Climate change on Federal Crop Insurance Loss Ratios By Yi, Jing; Richardson, James W.; Bryant, Henry L.; Worqlul, Abeyou W.
  60. How Scary Are Food Scares? Evidence from Animal Disease Outbreaks By Houser, Dwight M.; Karali, Berna
  61. Price elasticity of residential water demand: a Meta analysis of studies on water demand, (case study: Iran) By Abolhasani, L.; Tajabadi, M.; Shahnoushi Forushahi, N.
  62. Price discovery in the European wheat market By Vollmer, Teresa; Von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan
  63. Effects of Urbanization on Food Demand in China By Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Devadoss, Stephen
  64. Food Insecurity and Family Structure in Nigeria By Owoo, Nkechi S.; Upton, Joanna; Bageant, Elizabeth
  65. Federal Natural Disaster Assistance Programs for Livestock Producers, 2008-16 By MacLachlan, Matthew; Ramos, Sean; Hungerford, Ashley; Edwards, Seanicaa
  66. Farmland Value Expectation and Its Impact on Farmland Market: Evidence from Surveys of Agricultural Professionals since 1964 By Mei, Jiayou; Zhang, Wendong; Hayes, Dermot J.
  67. Fertilizer Subsidy and Agricultural Productivity: Empirical Evidence from Nepal By Paudel, Jayash; Crago, Christine L.
  68. Water Availability, Land Allocation, and the Role of Irrigation Districts under Prior Appropriation Doctrine By Ji, Xinde; Cobourn, Kelly M.
  69. Improved Agricultural Technology Adoption in Zambia: Are Women Farmers Being Left Behind? By Namonje-Kapembwa, Thelma; Chapoto, Antony
  70. Distributional Impacts of Green Taxes on Food Consumption in Catalonia By Dogbe, Wisdom; Gil, Jose Maria
  71. Climate change and agriculture: Do ecosystem services matter? By Miyamoto, Bruno C. B.; Gori-Maia, Alexandre; Ruiz Garcia, Junior
  72. Identification of and Consumer Behavior in Food Deserts: A Case Study of South Korea By Heo, Seong-Yoon; Lee, Kyei-Im; Zulauf, Carl R.; Noh, Seung-Chul; Kim, Sang-Hyo
  73. Farm Level Knowledge, and Adaptation to Climate Change: Evidence from China By Wang, Haigui; Zhuo, Ni; Ye, Chunhui
  74. Drivers of participation in gypsum treatment of fields as an innovation for water protection By Kosenius, A.-K.; Ollikainen, M.
  75. The Economic Challenge of Mitigating Climate Change through Forestry Activities By van Kooten, G. Cornelis
  76. A test of the gambler’s and hot hand fallacies in farmers’ weather and market predictions By Doidge, Mary; Feng, Hongli; Hennessy, David A.
  77. Land Tenure and Adoption of Straw Retention: Evidence from Chinese Grain Crop Growers By Mei, Yingdan; Gao, Li; Zhang, Wendong
  78. The Welfare Impact of Supermarkets Entry into Food Deserts By Fan, Linlin
  79. The precautionary principle and regulatory impact assessment: on the need for initial screening of hazards in regulatory work with examples from transport By Nerhagen, Lena; Forsstedt, Sara; Edvardsson, Karin
  80. How Fluctuations in Farm and Off-Farm Income Could Affect the Financial Performance of U.S. Farm Operator Dairy Farms: A Farm-level Analysis By Erickson, Kenneth W.; Featherstone, Allen M.; Subedi, Dipak; Nehring, Richard F.; Harris, James Michael
  81. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and Structural Changes in Beef Import Demand: Evidence from Japanese and South Korean Import Markets By Ning, Xin; Grant, Jason; Peterson, Everett B.
  82. Measuring Agricultural and Structural Transformation By Naseem, Anwar; Oehmke, James F.; Anderson, Jock; Mbaye, Samba; Pray, Carl; Nagarajan, Latha; Moss, Charles B.; Post, Lori
  83. Impact of participation in certified organic production on farm household’s economic and agri-environmental performance By Khanal, Aditya R.; Mishra, Ashok K.
  84. Farmers’ Willingness to Reuse Agricultural Biomass Wastes for Low Carbon Development By Jiang, Linli; Zhang, Junbiao; Wang, Holly H.
  85. What drives sustainable intensification of maize production among smallholder farmers? Panel Survey Evidence from Tanzania By Kim, Jongwoo; Mason, Nicole M.
  86. The Effect of the Conservation Reserve Program on Rural Economies: Deriving a Statistical Verdict from a Null Finding By Brown, Jason P.; Wojan, Timothy R.; Lambert, Dayton M.
  87. Price-Based Policies for Managing Residential Land Development: Impacts on Water Quality By Wrenn, Douglas H.; Klaiber, Allen; Newburn, David
  88. A New Approach for Modeling Household Food Demand with Panel Data: The Case of Cold Cereals By Dong, Diansheng; Stewart, Hayden; McLaughlin, Patrick W.
  89. Location and Profit Drivers of Local Food Hubs By Cleary, Rebecca; Goetz, Stephan J.; Thilmany McFadden, Dawn D.; Ge, Houtian
  90. Effects of Natural Disaster on Rice Production at Farm Level: New Evidence from Vietnam By Nguyen, Hong - Ron; Ngo, Quang - Thanh; Nguyen, Ngoc - Danh
  91. Estimating Food Loss at Individual Household Level By Yu, Yang; Jaenicke, Edward C.
  92. Commodity Price Volatility and U.S. Monetary Policy: The Overshooting Hypothesis of Agricultural Commodity Prices By Siami-Namini, Sima; Hudson, Michael D.; Trindade, A. Alexandre
  93. Climate Change Impacts on US Wheat Production through Crop Abandonment By Obembe, Oladipo S.
  94. How Much Does Food Environment Matter: A Case Study of the Value of Food Environment in Dan River Region By Yu, Ling; You, Wen; Hill, Jennie
  95. Impact of pre– and post-harvest training reminders on crop losses and food poverty in Mali By Dzanku, F.M.; Osei, R.D.
  96. Assessing The Value Of Quality And Food Safety Related Attributes: A Hedonic Analysis Of Chinese Meat Prices By Wahl, Thomas I.; Bai, Junfei; Seale, James L.
  97. Individual discounts rates for water-saving irrigation technologies using contingent valuation By Kovacs, Kent; Lee, Ji Yong; Nayga, Rodolfo M.; Henry, Christopher; Tsiboe, Francis; Krutz, Larry
  98. Impact of water shortage on the competitiveness of agricultural commodities in Tunisia By Chebil, A.; Frija, A.; Bennouna, B.
  99. Perception Biases and Land Use Decisions By Feng, Hongli; Wang, Tong; Hennessy, David A.
  100. Modeling the factors affecting farmers’ timing of adoption of in-field conservation cropping practices By Canales Medina, Elizabeth; Bergtold, Jason S.; Williams, Jeffery R.
  101. Labeling Food Safety Attributes: To Inform or Not to Inform? By Britwum, Kofi; Yiannaka, Amalia
  102. Do Farm Land Rental Markets Really Promote Efficiency, Equity and Investment in Smallholder African Agriculture? Evidence from a Matched Tenant-Landlord Survey in Malawi By Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob; Lunduka, Rodney W.; Kanyamuka, Joseph Samuel; Jumbe, Charles; Kaiyatsa, Stevier; Chamberlin, Jordan
  103. Food Sampling’s Effectiveness in Inducing Immediate Purchase in Chinese Supermarkets By Chen, Lijun; Parcell, Joe L.
  104. Examining Market Power in the Finnish Dairy Chain By Valtiala, Juho P.; Rezitis, Anthony N.
  105. Are Millennials More Green? A Consumer vs. Citizen Analysis of Dairy Product Preferences in Canada By Boaitey, Albert; Goddard, Ellen
  106. Determinants of successful product innovations in the German food industry By Kerssenbrock, Patricia; Hartmann, Monika; Hirsch, Stefan
  107. Measuring the Farm Level Impact of Rural Credit: A Two-stage Approach By Eusébio, Gabriela Dos Santos; Gori-Maia, Alexandre; Silveira, Rodrigo Lanna F.
  108. FOREST INDUSTRY IN REPUBLIC OF BULGARIA: STATE AND PROSPECTS By Radostina Popova
  109. China’s Foreign Agriculture Investments By Gooch, Elizabeth; Gale, Fred
  110. A Multi-regional Input-output Linear Programming Model of Water Allocation in the Southeastern US By Sheng, Di; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.; Menard, Jamey; Lambert, Lixia He; Hughes, David W.; Clark, Christopher D.
  111. Multicrop Production Decisions and Economic Irrigation Water Use Efficiency: Effects of Water Costs, Pressure Irrigation Adoption and Climate Determinants By Fan, Yubing; Massey, Raymond E.; Park, Seong C.
  112. Farmers’ Adoption of Pressure Irrigation Systems and Scientific Scheduling Practices: An Application of Multilevel Models By Fan, Yubing; McCann, Laura M.
  113. Food Retail Market Structure and Produce Purchases in the U.S. By Cai, Xiaowei; Volpe, Richard J.; Schroeter, Christiane; Mancino, Lisa
  114. Consumers’ Willingness to Waste Food: Attitude toward Environmentally Responsible Behavior and Food Expiration By Jovanovic, Nina; Katare, Bhagyashree; Lim, Kar Ho
  115. The Market Structure for Crop Insurance and the Effects on Insurance Contracts By DeLay, Nathan D.; Chouinard, Hayley H.; Walters, Cory G.; Wandschneider, Philip R.
  116. The demand for public-private crop insurance and government disaster relief By Liesivaara, Petri; Myyrä, Sami
  117. Experimental Measures of the Effect of Food Fraud Education on Demand for Local Honey By Jones Ritten, Chian A.; Ehmke, Mariah D.; Thunstrom, Linda; Beiermann, Jenny; Mcleod, Donald
  118. Asymmetric Price Volatility Interaction between U.S. Food and Energy Markets By Saghaian, Sayed H.; Nemati, Mehdi; Walters, Cory G.; Chen, Bo
  119. Effects of Information Framing on Smallholder Irrigation Farmers’ Willingness to Pay for Groundwater Protection: The Case of Vea Irrigation Scheme in Ghana By Alhassan, Mustapha; Gustafson, Christopher R.; Schoengold, Karina
  120. Future volatility forecast in agricultural commodity markets By Guimaraes, Jonathan S.; Cruz, Jose Cesar
  121. An Analysis on Sustainable Food Consumption by Income Level: The Case of Environment-friendly Fresh Grains in Korea By Kwon, Jisoo; Kim, Hyeon-Woong; Yoo, Do-il
  122. Good Agricultural Practices, Farm Income, and Fertilizer Usage: Empirical Evidence from Smallholders in Nepal By Bairagi, Subir K.; Mishra, Ashok K.; Giri, Anil
  123. Farmers’ preferences for varietal trait improvements: The case of rice farmers in Nueva Ecija, Philippines By Maligalig, Rio L.; Demont, Matty; Umberger, Wendy J.; Peralta, Alexandra
  124. Time variant risk preferences in agriculture: evidences from Italy By Bozzola, Martina; DiFalco, Salvatore; Finger, Robert
  125. Annual and cropping season environmental production conditions effects on smallholder technical efficiency in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Ethiopia By Baffoe-Bonnie, Anthony; Kostandini, Gentian
  126. Good intentions bad outcomes: the effects of investment subsidies on agricultural productivity By Bawa, Siraj G.
  127. On the effects of linking voluntary cap-and-trade systems for CO2 emissions By Martin L. Weitzman; Bjart Holtsmark
  128. Dairy Farm Management Priorities and Implications By Lai, John; Widmar, Nicole; Wolf, Christopher A.
  129. Trade effects of food regulations and standards: Assessing the impact of SPS measures on market structure By Alia, Didier Y.; Zheng, Yuqing; Kusunose, Yoko; Reed, Michael R.
  130. Agricultural Technology Intervention, Health Information and Pesticide Use among Farmers: Evidence from China By Zhang, Chao; Sun, Yiduo; Hu, Ruifa
  131. Which incentives for direct selling? An analysis of French farms By Enjolras, Geoffroy; Aubert, Magali
  132. Independent Grocery Stores in the Changing Landscape of the U.S. Food Retail Industry By Cho, Clare; Volpe, Richard J.
  133. Federal crop insurance participation and adoption of sustainable production practices by U.S. farms By Ifft, Jennifer; Jodlowski, Margaret
  134. Factors Affecting 2014 Farm Bill Commodity Program Enrollment for Kansas Farmers By Taylor, Mykel R.; Tonsor, Glynn T.; Wilson, Candice
  135. Re-Envisioning the Margin Protection Program By Richard, Jessica; Tyler, Mark; Burdine, Kenneth
  136. Water right seniority, economic efficiency and land allocation decisions By Cobourn, Kelly M.; Ji, Xinde; Mooney, Sian; Crescenti, Neil
  137. Consumers’ Valuation for Craft Beer: Does the Localness of Inputs Matter? By Ha, Kim; Atallah, Shadi S.; Bazzani, Claudia; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
  138. Do Forest Property Characteristics Reveal Landowners’ Willingness to Accept Payment for Ecosystem Services Contracts? By Kang, Moon Jeong; Siry, Jacek; Colson, Gregory J.; Ferreira, Susana
  139. An Empirical Analysis of Water Allocation Efficiency through the Prior Appropriation Doctrine: A Case Study in the Carson River Valley, Nevada By Lee, Gi-Eu; Rollins, Kimberly S.; Singletary, Loretta
  140. Economics of Agricultural Aviation Industry in the United States: Optimum Applicator Pricing, Effects of Regulation and Efficacy of Technologies By Cain, Stephen; Dharmasena, Senarath; Martin, Daniel
  141. The Welfare Impacts of Demand-Enhancing Agricultural Innovations: The Case of Honeycrisp Apples By Wang, Yanghao; Cakir, Metin
  142. Understanding Crop Insurance Barriers for Organic and Diversified Farms By Belasco, Eric
  143. Drivers of Indivisible Technology Channel Access and Service Provision among Small and Medium Sized Food Processing Firms in Tanzania By Snyder, Jason E.; Tschirley, David L.; Reardon, Thomas A.
  144. Food Waste, Impulsivity and Risk: Heterogeneous Behavioral Responses By Dusoruth, Vaneesha; Peterson, Hikaru Hanawa
  145. COST PASS-THROUGH AND PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION By Bittmann, Thomas; Loy, Jens-Peter; Anders, Sven
  146. Estimating Agricultural Acreage Responses to Input Prices: Groundwater in California By Stevens, Andrew W.

  1. By: Haile, B.; Azzarri, C.; Heady, D.; You, L.
    Abstract: Notwithstanding improvements over the last several decades, food and nutrition insecurity is still widespread and progresses made have been uneven. In Africa, the central and western parts scored the lowest and highest reduction in malnutrition, respectively. This regional heterogeneity is expected given the spatial variation in (inclusive) economic growth, agro-ecology, market access, the prevalence of diseases and infections, as well as institutional and policy environments (e.g., social protection systems) that affect the various dimensions of food and nutrition security. At the same time, climatic and weather changes are expected to worsen in the coming decades with potentially devastating effects in the region, given its heavily relies on rain-fed agriculture and the market and institutional failures that limit the set of coping and adaptation strategies. This study examines the linkages between climatic shocks and child undernutrition in the diverse farming systems of Africa. We examine effects of climatic changes not only through yields (agricultural mechanism) but also through vector-borne and gastrointestinal diseases (health mechanism). Preliminary results suggest significant heterogeneity in the incidence of child undernutrition and the effects of climatic shocks by agro-ecology and farming systems, meriting further investigation we are currently undertaking to disentangle the role of each mechanism.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275928&r=agr
  2. By: Houessionon, P.
    Abstract: The main purpose of this paper is to estimate farmers’ preferences and their willingness to pay (WTP) for ecosystem services derived from four agricultural water management (AWM) and resource recovery and reuse (RRR) intervention options in Burkina Faso, using choice experiment (CE). These include; small water infrastructures, drip irrigation, organic matter recovery from waste, and treated wastewater. The design decisions relating to attribute selection, the level of attributes, alternatives and choice tasks were guided by literature, field visit, focus group discussions, experts input and an iterative process of STATA to generate an orthogonal main effects CE design. The data used was generated from a random sample of 300 farm households in the Dano and Ouagadougou municipalities in Burkina Faso. Results from conditional logit, latent class logit and mixt logit models show that farmers have positive and significant preferences for drip irrigation, treated waste water and organic matter. However, they are WTP on average, more for drip irrigation and organic matter for agricultural sustainability. In line with economic theory, the cost of an intervention reduces demand for a given intervention. These findings can provide policy makers with evidence for agricultural policy design to build farmers’ resilience in the Sahel.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275873&r=agr
  3. By: Laborde Debucquet, David; Piñeiro, Valeria
    Abstract: Argentina's G20 presidency has emphasized the needs to improve soil management and increase agricultural productivity in a sustainable way to achieve an inclusive and resilient food future. While increases in agricultural productivity improve economic welfare and can help address food security problems by benefiting both consumers and producers simultaneously, it has to address the depletion of scarce natural resources. In the context of changing climate, achieving sustainable and resilient agricultural production is a major corner stone in both adaptation and mitigation strategies. The global community needs to have the proper tools to monitor sustainable agricultural productivity gains, identifying countries and sectors lagging behind, and committing R&D efforts accordingly to the challenges ahead. As such, it is suggested that 1) an international consortium should monitor Agricultural Total Factor Productivity to provide international comparisons and track performance over time; 2) the G20 should acknowledge and address the issue of sustainable productivity measurement, and; 3) support more in depth research on the relation between Agricultural TFP and Agricultural R&D.
    Keywords: agricultural productivity,total factor productivity,TFP measurement,agricultural R&D,sustainable TFP,technological change
    JEL: O13 O19 O33 Q16 Q18
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:ifwedp:201864&r=agr
  4. By: Riera, S.
    Abstract: Water is a key resource to agriculture in Mendoza but there are increasing concerns regarding the viability of current practices and availability. Some farms fall short of their production potential, which questions the economic viability of some vineyards, and might trigger structural change and lead to additional pressure on water use. Improvements in irrigation efficiency could help mitigate this problem. Farmers pay for the resource management but do not have to consider the opportunity cost of the resource itself. This paper estimates the technical efficiency (TE) of grapevine production controling for the use of water. The preliminary results point out average efficiency scores of 0.78, where relatively efficient farmers lack proper management practices on water resources. Further estimation of the intrinsic value of irrigation water will provide an additional tool to design specific policies for the sector.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275995&r=agr
  5. By: McCarthy, Sinéad N.; O’Rourke, Daniel; Kearney, John; McCarthy, Mary; Henchion, Maeve; Hyland, J. J.
    Abstract: Introduction : Food consumption accounts for 20-30% of greenhouse gas emissions in the EU. Certain foods have higher emissions than others and are often the target of policy makers to reduce greenhouse gasses associated with food consumption. However, food policy should aim to address both climatic and health imbalances concurrently and hence have more significant impact. Targeting excessive food consumption as a mitigation strategy for greenhouse gas emissions may also have a concurrent impact on the global obesity epidemic Objective: To evaluate the greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) associated with the excessive food and energy intake in Irish adults. Methods: A secondary analysis of nationally representative data from the National Adult Food & Nutrition Survey, 2011, was conducted. The demographic characteristics, food consumption patterns and diet-associated GHGEs were compared across categories of increasing levels of relative energy intake. One-way ANOVA (p<0.05) was used to determine the level of significance across quintiles of relative energy intake. Results: Different dietary patterns were evident between the categories of varying relative energy intake. A strong positive correlation (r = 0.736; p< 0.001) was evident between dietary GHGE and the EI relative to one’s requirements. In Irish diets, animal products contributed to a large proportion of total dietary GHGE but accounted for much less of overall EI. Plant-based foods were the lowest contributors to total GHGE. When constructing strategies to mitigate dietary carbon emissions, it is important to carefully consider all aspects of sustainability. The exclusion of certain food groups from the average diet may provoke health, economical and/or cultural repercussions. An adherence to the Irish dietary guidelines, including a decrease of EI, can viably attenuate dietary environmental impact Conclusions: The results offer further evidence to support the hypothesis that excessive energy consumption and the overconsumption of certain food types are detrimental to overall diet-associated carbon emissions levels, and that adhering to the current Irish dietary guidelines can potentially lower dietary related GHGE.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2018–09–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa166:276208&r=agr
  6. By: Khan, M.A.; Tahir, A.
    Abstract: Climate Change is an ever growing issue with a great importance due to wide socio-economic effects. Agriculture is the most climate sensitive economic sector that is influenced both positively and negatively by climate change. A change in temperature or precipitation could cause a significant change in crops productivity and yields. Different crop/bio-physical experts have been making efforts to process the impact of climate on crop yields through different crop modellings using input from different global climate models. In this research, the output of the crop models is used as a shock in the global computable general equilibrium economic model to evaluate the economic effects of climate change. Pakistan has two crop seasons – Kharif and Rabi- therefore two major crops i.e. Wheat and Rice have been chosen for this analysis. A Baseline scenario, representing business as usual with no change in climate, has been created using projections for GDP, population, factor supplies, and required food production. A counterfactual experiment has done using the same GDP and population growth as in the baseline but with addition of crop yield shocks from bio-physical models. A comparison of these two experiments has shown the economic effects of climate change by 2035.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275969&r=agr
  7. By: Carillo, Mario Francesco
    Abstract: This paper explores the effect of agricultural policies on industrialization and economic development over the long-run. I analyze the differential effect of the \textit{Battle for Grain}, implemented by the Italian Fascist regime to achieve self-sufficiency in wheat production, on the development path across areas of Italy. Employing time variation, along with cross-sectional variation in the suitability of land for the implementation of the advanced wheat production technologies, I find that the policy had unintended positive effects on industrialization and economic prosperity which persisted until the contemporary period. Furthermore, I find that the positive effect of the \textit{Battle for Grain} on human capital accumulation was instrumental in this process, suggesting that the complementarity between human capital and agricultural technology may be a critical mechanism through which agricultural productivity may enhance the development of non-agricultural sectors.
    Keywords: Agricultural Policy; Agricultural Productivity; Industrialization; Human Capital; Long-run Dve
    JEL: F13 J24 N54 O13 O14 O25 O33 Q16 Q17 Q18
    Date: 2018–09–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:88941&r=agr
  8. By: Pulina, P.; Arru, B.; Madau, F.A.; Furesi, R.; Gasco, L.
    Abstract: This proposal aims to estimate the incidence of fish meal basis diet into the total farm cost structure and how the weight can change considering different hypotheses related to introduction of insect meal into the diet. Hypotheses were proposed on the basis of increasing levels of insect meal into the diet and different prices for purchasing this meal. Economic effects were simulated according to some empirical trials carried out into the scientific literature and were applied to the European sea bass farming. A case study approach on a specialized off-shore sea bass farm in Italy was proposed. It is a small-scale farm that solely produce for local and domestic market. Findings suggest that feeding cost amounts to about 63% of the total farm cost. Possible introduction of insect meal – specifically composed by Tenebrio molitor basis – would force farmers to increase feeding cost. As it stands today, higher environmental sustainability expected by inclusion of insect meal would not be gone with more economic convenience. However technological development, higher competition into the insect meal industry, increase of production scale, and adoption of strategies aimed to weaken bargaining power between fish farmers and meal suppliers could generate a price decrease.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275929&r=agr
  9. By: Nazareth, M.; Cunha, D.; Gurgel, A.
    Abstract: Agriculture is highly dependent on environment conditions, mainly temperature, precipitation and soil quality, thus it becomes the most vulnerable economic sector to the new climate conditions projected for the next decades. Therefore, knowing these impacts and the consequences for the rest of the economy is essential to map the effects and to elaborate, if necessary, mitigating environmental and economic policies. However, studies focusing on Brazil based on more regionalized data but linked to the rest of the world using dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) models are still very incipient. So this is precisely the gap that this article intends to fill, offering a modest contribution to the debate. Then, the objective of this paper is to determine the economic impact of the estimated changes in average agricultural productivity for the coming decades using a dynamic CGE model, the PAEGDyn linked to GTAP. Basically, the results found confirm trends in other works: the tropical regions in the world will be the most affected by the probable increase in the planet temperature, decreases in agricultural productivity and, thus, a reduction in economic performance.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275876&r=agr
  10. By: Mottaleb, K.; Erenstein, O.
    Abstract: Using information collected from more than 29,000 households by the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, the present study examines the gender-differentiated impacts of the commodity price hikes in 2008-09 on food and non-food consumption behavior based on the sex of the household head. Applying the difference-indifference estimation procedure in a natural experiment setting, this study demonstrates that, in general, commodity price hikes more adversely affected the female-headed households. In 2010, they were forced to reduce expenditures on food and non-food items, and particularly cereal, non-cereal, health and education expenditures, more than the male-headed households. However, this study clearly shows that the impacts of commodity price hikes were lower on the female-headed households headed by educated females and those who owned larger pieces of land, received remittances, and allocated labor to non-farm sectors. These sub-sets were not affected by the commodity price shocks in 2010 compared to 2000. The findings strongly suggest that the provision of both human and physical capital is instrumental in developing countries to empower female headed-households to withstand economic shocks.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275915&r=agr
  11. By: Alamgir, M.S.; Furuya, J.; Kobayashi, S.; Salam, M.A.
    Abstract: Widespread poverty is the most serious threat and social problem that Bangladesh faces. Regional vulnerability to climate change threatens to escalate the magnitude of this poverty. It is essential that projections of poverty be made while bearing in mind the effects of climate change. The current study uses analysis of variance, cluster analysis, and log-normal distribution to estimate the parameters of income variability that ascertain vulnerability levels and help us understand the poverty levels that climate change could potentially incur. The analytical results show that variances of rice income contribute to the agricultural income differences. Constant reduction of rice yield due to climate change in Bangladesh is not so severe problems for farmers. However, poverty rates in Mymensingh, Rajshahi, and Rangpur region would be affected by unexpected yield loss due to climate change. Therefore, research and development of adaptation measures to climate change for regions where farmers are largely dependent on agricultural income is important.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275920&r=agr
  12. By: Genova, C.; Umberger, W.; Peralta, A.; Newman, S.
    Abstract: This paper examines the empirical link between smallholder vegetable production and the dietary diversity of children aged 0.5 to 17 years at the household level through: vegetable diversity, market engagement, and gender-related factors. We use Child Dietary Diversity Score (CDDS) as measure of children’s diets. We find that market access and market participation can significantly improve CDDS, especially for older boys >5 to 17 years. For children under five years, improving the nutritional knowledge of the food preparer, promoting market linkage to increase income, and implementing intervention targeted on the low-lying and low vegetable per capita density areas can improve diet quality.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:276033&r=agr
  13. By: Gatti, N.; Baylis, K.; Crost, B.
    Abstract: Using detailed data on conflict-related incidents in Indonesia, we exploit seasonal variation in the relationship between rainfall and agricultural production to study the mechanism linking climate change and conflict. Furthermore, we ask whether irrigation and dam infrastructure help mitigate this link. We find that wet-season rainfall decreases production while rainfall during the dry season is beneficial for production. If agriculture is the mechanism through which climate change affects conflict, then we should expect the opposite effect on conflict, but with one-year lag. Our results show that, as expected, dry-season rainfall decreases conflict in Indonesia and in agricultural regions like Java, while wet-season rainfall increases conflict. In the latter, we find that irrigation increases conflict instead of reducing it. For Indonesia, irrigation reduces the effect of conflict during the dry season and amplifies it during the wet season. A plausible explanation is that the irrigation network is not well adapted to agriculture necessities which could generate civil unrest when a weather shock occurs. A policy that aim to reducing the impact of climate change on civil conflict should consider these drawbacks.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275936&r=agr
  14. By: Wollni, M.; Lanza, G.; Ibanez, M.
    Abstract: In this study, we explore the effects of payments for environmental services on land use decisions among farmers living in Jambi province in Indonesia. Using a framed field experiment we compare land use decisions in a baseline with no payment with two alternative payments for environmental services (PES): an individual incentive scheme, where each participant receives a flat rate payment for each experimental land unit conserved, and a collective incentive scheme that offers individual payments only if an aggregate pre-determined conservation threshold is passed by the group. We find that individual and collective PES are equally effective on the average to increase environmentally friendly behavior associated with the cultivation of rubber agroforestry. Yet we find that whereas individual incentives work equally well for small and large farmers, collective incentives only work for large farmers. In addition, collective incentives generate an increase in conservation even at low payment levels whereas individual incentives only work when payments are high. Participants with a larger social network cultivating oil palm invest a lower share of their endowment in conservation. These findings highlight how land heterogeneity and social capital influence the success of a PES scheme.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275968&r=agr
  15. By: Carpentier, Alain
    Abstract: Prospect Theory suggests that farmers’ attitudes toward pest risks depend on the situation they refer to when facing crop protection decisions. Farmers referring to the ‘protected crop’ situation may implement self-insurance pesticide treatments while farmers referring to the ‘unprotected crop’ situation are risk neutral toward pest risks. Importantly, farmers are more likely to refer to the ‘protected crop’ situation when pesticides are relatively inexpensive. This in turn leads to original results related to the regulation of agricultural pesticide uses. For instance, pesticide taxes would not only impact pesticide expected profitability but also farmers’ attitude toward pest risks.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261265&r=agr
  16. By: Berges, M.; Casellas, K.; Echeverria, L.; Urquiza Jozami, G.
    Abstract: In Argentina, the incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is high, with approximately 420 new cases observed each year. A strain called VTEC 0157 of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was identified as the primary cause of HUS. The retail sale of beef in Argentina is marketed mainly without labels, brands or certifications, in butchers shops that represent 75% of the market share. In the context of the Healthy Butchers program, bacteriological evaluations at butcher shops detected cross contamination of food with pathogens in beef retail environment. In this paper, we measure consumer preferences for selected food safety attributes in beef and butcher shops, taking their information and knowledge about safety into account. We use a discrete choice experiment to assess consumers WTP using primary data from Buenos Aires, Argentina. Results suggest that consumers’ utility increases when there is a cashier at the butcher shop, the butcher wears gloves and uses recommended tables to cut meat, and beef products have a properly lay out at meat display fridge at consumers’ sight. Consumers’ knowledge and information about foodborne diseases and beef contamination risks increase the WTP for safety attributes at butcher shops. This effect is especially stronger for the last two mentioned attributes, which require a more detailed observation from consumers. Implications for food retail managers and policy-makers are discussed.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275872&r=agr
  17. By: Majewski, Edward; Malak-Rawlikowska, Agata
    Abstract: The dynamic nature of changes in the macroeconomic environment and various views of Member States on the future of the Common Agricultural Policy in the European Union cause that its shape is usually a result of various forces and factors. They are both, exogenous, related to the situation on global markets, economic policy on a global scale and European Union, as well as endogenous, connected to the changes in the agricultural sector and its direct environment. The on going discussion revealed many controversies which will have an impact on the decisions shaping the CAP for the next budget perspective after 2020. The aim of this study is to critically review the evolution of agricultural policy and to identify possible scenarios for its changes in the new budgetary perspective after 2020. Before identifying possible scenarios of the future agricultural policy of the EU, the authors draw attention to some dilemmas such as: predicted increase in global demand for food, limiting production intensity in the EU, rationality of the level and allocation of support, problem of capitalization of subsidies in land prices, conflicting objectives of the CAP, diverse expectations of Member States, and consequences of Brexit for the CAP in the next budgetary perspective. Fundamental reforms of the CAP took place in the 1990s in response to international pressure and the results of GATT and later WTO negotiations. The current reform of the CAP must deal with other types of external forces, such as the crisis of the euro-zone, disintegration movements (Brexit) and integration in the euro-zone, the influx of emigrants, the threat of terrorism, as well as worsening effects of climate change. The authors, based on a literature review and their own reflections, present six possible scenarios for the development of the CAP after 2020. It is very likely that the shape of the future CAP will be the result of a political compromise between Member States, which may indicate that there will be no radical changes in the CAP in the next budgetary perspective. In the long run, agricultural policy will undergo further transformations, forced among others by the likely technological revolution facing the 21st century agriculture, demographic changes in the countryside, climate change or the need to support rural development, taking into account their diversity in the EU countries.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, International Development
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepa:276368&r=agr
  18. By: Derya Keles; Philippe Delacote; Alexander Pfaff
    Abstract: Since the late 1970s protected areas have been one of the most widely used regulatory tools for the conservation of ecosystem services. In this paper, we assess the possible drivers to the choice of withdrawing protected areas in the Brazilian Amazon. Protected areas are subject to inefficiencies because of the existence of conflicts over land between conservation and development activities. Further additionality is an issue, as protected areas tend to be located in areas with low opportunity cost of conservation, where forests are not likely to be cleared. This issue is particularly important in the Brazilian Amazon where growing development must be combined with the need to avoid deforestation. We first present a simple model of degazettement choice which leads us to assess how the presence of two agencies having different development and conservation objectives can lead to implementing this decision. We suggest that the probability to decide the removal of protected areas is larger in places with low and high development pressures. Then, we investigate the empirical determinants of protected area withdrawal by taking advantages of the new PADDDtracker (Protected Area Downgradement, Degazettement and Downsizement) dataset (WWF, 2017b). We confirm that the likelihood of degazettement is strongly influenced by development pressures, through characteristics of the land that enable agricultural development, and by variables related to protected area quality of enforcement and management costs. As protected areas located in highest pressure areas are more likely to be additional, there is a risk that only the most effective protected areas may loose their protection.
    Keywords: Conservation policy, PADDD, Land-use change, Brazilian Amazon, Public policy.
    JEL: Q56 Q57 Q58 O13 O21
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ulp:sbbeta:2018-35&r=agr
  19. By: Grethe, H.; Siddig, K.; Stepanyan, D.; Zhu, T.; Wiebelt, M.
    Abstract: Several environmental changes have encountered the Sudan in the past; several are ongoing and others are projected to happen in the future. The Sudan has witnessed increases in temperature, various floods, rainfall variability and concurrent droughts (USAID, 2016). This study do not only look at the economywide impacts of climate change, but also consults national policy plans, strategies and various other environmental assessments to propose possible interventions. We feed the climate forcing as well as water demand and macro-socioeconomic trends into a modelling suite that includes models for global hydrology, river basin management, water stress and a DSSAT1 all connected to IMPACT2 model. The outcomes are annual crop yield (ton/hectare) and global food prices under various climate change scenarios until 2050. The distributional effects of such changes are assessed using a single country dynamic CGE3 model for the Sudan. Additionally, we introduce yield variability into the CGE model based on stochastic projections of crop yield until 2050. Results reveal that while the projected mean climate changes bring some good news for the Sudan, extreme negative variability cost the Sudan accumulatively (2018-2050) US$ 109.8 billion in total absorption and US$ 105.1 billion in GDP relative to no climate change scenario.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275903&r=agr
  20. By: Kuhmonen, Irene
    Abstract: This paper investigated farmers’ self-stated adoption motives and the perceived effectiveness of agri-environmental measures in Finland. The measures were classified into ten distinct categories according to their prescriptions. The adoption motives were related to contextual factors, production factors and perceived effectiveness of the measures, while effectiveness was further related to land use, input use and the final impacts. The results indicate that the adoption motivations and the perceived effectiveness of the measures are related to their prescriptions: measures targeting the same problem with different prescriptions fit the aims and farming strategies of different farmers.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261108&r=agr
  21. By: Khed, V.; K.b., U.
    Abstract: This study examines the responsiveness of major food commodities consumption expenditures to changes in total consumption expenditures and to changes in the price of those food commodities. The study uses LA-AIDS to derive farm household food demand elasticity using farm household panel data. The results revealed that, food consumption patterns and demand elasticities were quite different across farm size groups. The estimated income elasticities for food commodities showed that, elasticities were lowest for cereals groups and highest for high valued nutritious horticultural and livestock food products. The analysis of price and income effects based on the estimated demand system has recommended that with increase in food prices, the demand for staple food may not be affected adversely but, that of high-value food commodities is likely to be affected negatively. If increase in food commodity prices are ignored for an extended period of time, there will be adverse impact on the food diversification and resuming the cereal based consumption resulting in under-nourishment. The policy makers should take appropriate policy strategies for different farm size groups. It is better to distribute subsidized nutritive food and milch animals to achieve the food and nutritional security instead of providing financial benefit to farm households.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275899&r=agr
  22. By: Hitaj, Claudia; Weber, Jeremy; Erickson, Ken
    Abstract: With the shale revolution, annual oil and gas production in the United States grew by 69 percent from 2005 to 2014, and almost 67 percent of the production occurred on farmland in 2014. The effect of oil and gas development on farm sector finances is not well understood. Limited nationwide information exists on issues such as the extent that farm operators and landlords own the rights to the oil and gas beneath their land, the value of the rights, or the timing and prevalence of leasing with energy firms. Subsurface ownership affects the ability of operators and landlords to benefit financially from development and to shape the terms on which it occurs. Using data from USDA’s Tenure, Ownership, and Transition of Agricultural Land (TOTAL) survey, Drillinginfo, and USDA’s 2012 Census of Agriculture, this report quantifies the farm sector’s oil and gas wealth and income, and provides a basis for understanding how booms and busts in oil and gas production and prices might affect farm-sector finances.
    Keywords: Financial Economics
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uersib:276228&r=agr
  23. By: Vincent Chatellier; Thierry Pouch; Cécile Le Roy; Quentin Mathieu
    Abstract: [paper in French] Russia has been for many years an important outlet for the European Union (EU) in the agri-food sector. Following the break-up of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) in 1991, Russian agriculture, which until then had been dominated by sovkhozes and kolkhozes, had suffered a drastic fall in domestic production, in particular in animal production. Over the past fifteen years, and due to a policy encouraging investment in agriculture, especially in agro-industrial complexes where the integration model prevails, agricultural production progressed rapidly, at least in certain sectors, including cereals, poultry meat and pork. This development of domestic supply and the diversification of supplier countries (including the United States, Brazil, etc.) had, even before the embargo imposed since August 2014, led to a substantial loss of European exports to Russia. Since the embargo was effective, Russia is no longer a privileged partner for European animal productions. Thanks to the growth of imports in several Asian countries, especially in China, several European animal sectors have nevertheless managed, despite the closure of the Russian market, to increase their exports. This paper deals, first of all, with the main stages of the Russian agricultural and trade policy, the development of agricultural production in this country, and the implementation of the embargo. Using customs statistics data (from BACI and COMEXT databases) over the period 2000 to 2016, it then discusses the evolution of trade flows following the implementation of the embargo, with particular emphasis on Russia's bilateral relations with the EU in four animal sectors: milk and milk products, beef and veal, poultry meat, and pork.
    Keywords: Russie, embargo, compétitivité, échanges commerciaux, productions animales
    JEL: Q13 Q17 F13 F14
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rae:wpaper:201806&r=agr
  24. By: Khed, V.; V., S.
    Abstract: The recommendation to eat diverse types of foodstuffs is an internationally accepted recommendation for a healthy life. In this way, the study was conducted to assess the nutritional status and dietary diversity of the 160 rural and urban households in Vijayapur district of Karnataka using 24 hours recall method with a view to understanding the heterogeneity in food habits, quality of diet intake and the socioeconomic and demographic determinants of the dietary diversity in study area. There was significant disparity among the rural and urban areas in terms of food intake level across the income groups. The MPC consumption was higher in rural areas as compare to urban areas. However, the energy intake was higher in urban areas as against rural areas, since consumption of high value nutritious foods. By overall, the intake of energy and other nutrients was lower than ICMR- Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). Dietary diversity result indicates, urban households consume more diversed food items as compare to rural households. From a policy perspective, it is therefore important to focus interventions on improving dietary diversity and nutrition security with proper understanding of the socio-economic setting of the target area and its population.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275911&r=agr
  25. By: Shabbir Ahmad (UQ Business School, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia); Sriram Shankar (ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods & Research School of Economics, Australian National University, Canberra, Australiaa); John Steen (UQ Business School, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia); Martie-Louise Verreynne (UQ Business School, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia); Abid Aman Burki (Department of Economics Mushtaq Ahmad Gurmani School of Humanities and Social Sciences Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan)
    Abstract: Smallholders are indispensable to ensuring food security in the developing economies where they farm. Policy interventions often target smallholders to provide for example, input subsidies, extension services and access to credit, because increased total factor productivity (Hsieh & Klenow, 2009) can ensure that they are better placed to support food security. However, the impact of such interventions and the drivers of TFP growth are largely unknown due to lack of comprehensive data and appropriate methodology. To overcome these impediments, we propose an econometric estimation of the components of TFP growth in a Bayesian set-up and apply this to new farm-level survey data of smallholders from Pakistan’s horticulture sector. The results indicate large technical and mix efficiency differentials across agro-climatic zones and farm sizes. These disparities in technical and mix efficiency are due to suboptimal farm practices, potentially from limited access to and adoption of technology. Government policy makers, support agencies, farmer groups and other stakeholders have latitude in providing adequate education and training programs aimed at improving input-use efficiency and introducing innovative practices leading to TFP growth.
    Keywords: Scope economies; developing economy; aggregator function; mix efficiency; TFP
    JEL: D31
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:qld:uq2004:597&r=agr
  26. By: Yanni, Sandra; Rajsic, Predrag; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia; Weersink, Alfons
    Abstract: The greenhouse gas (GHG) sources and carbon (C) sinks of Ontario’s agricultural soils and the impacts of management practices and potential strategies to reduce emissions and increase sinks are not well-quantified. In addition, there is a need to determine the economics behind different practices to better inform future program design. The objective of this review was to provide a synthesis of the science on the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of best management practices (BMPs) at mitigating GHG emissions and increasing sinks from soils, landscapes, climates and production systems relevant to Ontario.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2018–09–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uguiwp:276270&r=agr
  27. By: Kulawik, Jacek
    Abstract: The contemporary agriculture is among the most risky economic activities. In addition to the previously known production, price and market risk, and later also the financial risk, today agricultural producers are increasingly more often confronted with institutional risk and personnel management risk and risk related to climate change. On the other hand, farmers have at their disposal numerous tools and strategies to counteract threats and mitigate their negative effects. Among these risk management instruments and strategies, traditional/ conventional insurance of crops, livestock and tangible assets is still important. In this context, the basic goal of the article is to generalise the theoretical foundations of the above-mentioned insurance, but limited to their historically oldest approach; hence on the basis of neoclassical microeconomics and classical decision theory. According to the convention existing, the essence of the theory/hypothesis of the expected utility of von Neumann–Morgenstern is first analysed. In the last part of the article, the assumptions of the expected utility theory are concretised on the example of agricultural insurance.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Financial Economics
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepa:276371&r=agr
  28. By: Akoyi, K.T.; Mitiku, F.; Maertens, M.
    Abstract: Private sustainability standards are spreading rapidly in global agri-food value chains as a means of communicating important aspects of safety, ethics and environmental attributes of food production, to consumers. A cross-cutting requirement for most standards is the prohibition of child labour intended to improve child welfare. In this paper, we investigate the child schooling implications in the coffee sector in Ethiopia and Uganda. We use cross-sectional household survey data and probit, tobit, propensity score matching and difference-in-difference techniques to estimate the impact of certification on schooling. We find that FT certification increases the likelihood of children to be enrolled in secondary school by 25% and, primary and secondary schooling efficiency by 10% and 16%, respectively. We find that RA certification has no impact on both school enrolment and schooling efficiency. The results imply that prohibition of child labour alone is not sufficient to improve schooling outcomes and that FT keeps its child welfare promises in South Western Ethiopia and Eastern Uganda.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275958&r=agr
  29. By: Piet, Laurent
    Abstract: Over the last decades, the number of farms has been decreasing and their size increasing all over the European Union. This paper aims at studying the development of agricultural production concentration across EU Member States over the 2004-2013 period. Using an adapted version of the Herfindahl Hirschman Index (HHI), it shows that a variety of situations exists across Europe as regards the distribution of commercial farm sizes measured in Euros of standard output. Results document how the overall tendency to concentration may originate either from the reduction in farm numbers, or from farm sizes becoming more unequal, or both.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261439&r=agr
  30. By: Iqbal, Md Zabid; Babcock, Bruce A.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258379&r=agr
  31. By: Mancino, Lisa; Guthrie, Joanne; Ver Ploeg, Michele; Lin, Biing-Hwan
    Abstract: We use data from the USDA’s National Household and Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey to describe the nutritional quality of foods purchased and acquired by a nationally representative sample of Americans. We compare the nutritional quality of foods purchased and acquired by households that participate in USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to the foods of other low-income, SNAP-nonparticipating households and those of higher income households. We also compare the nutritional quality of foods purchased and acquired by households with low access to healthy food retailers to households with better access, for the population as a whole, and for the SNAP-participating and -nonparticipating subgroups previously described. Similarly, we compare nutritional quality of foods obtained from supermarkets and other grocery retailers to foods prepared away from home at restaurants, fast-food establishments, schools, and other sources for the whole population and for defined subgroups. We find that lower nutritional quality of household food acquisitions was associated with SNAP participation status and limited household access to healthy food retailers. More reliance on food prepared away from home was also associated with lower nutritional quality, especially for higher income households.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uersib:276248&r=agr
  32. By: Koné, Mankan M.; Gaigné, Carl; Tamini, Lota D.
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Production Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258211&r=agr
  33. By: Jena, P.R.; Kalli, R.
    Abstract: There is clear evidence of climate variability over a period of time in the developing countries and these countries are vulnerable to devastation caused by drought and floods. Analysis accompanied with robust results will create an opportunity to enhance the rural livelihoods that are prone to frequent climate shocks. We consider a southern state of India namely Karnataka, which belongs to a sub-tropical region facing a huge threat from climate change. In this article, we link agricultural production to climate variables to examine the impact of climatevariability on the crop yields. We follow a distinct approach using the nonlinear transformation of climatic variables to confirm climate damage on rice yields. The proposed econometric technique used in this paper is fixed effect panel regression model to identify the causal relationship between the yield and climate variables (rainfall and temperature). A panel of district wise cross section for a period of 1992-2013, with necessary inputs, is used in the model. The analysis in this paper is based on the smaller spatial scale (district wise) with updated climatic data emphasizing on Kharif season which helps to provide better insight on climate change effect and mitigation of climate-induced damages.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275970&r=agr
  34. By: Alvarado, E.; Ibanez, M.; Brummer, B.
    Abstract: The effects of climate change on agriculture have been widely studied. However, it is necessary to keep studying the responses that farmers could have to climate change. One of these responses is the adaptation. We have used anticipatory and reactive adaptation because we wanted to know if farmers prefer options to avoid or to face negative effects. The objective of this research was to understand how risk preferences along with social capital affect the decision to implement anticipatory or reactive adaptation options to climate change. This study took place in central Chile, data were collected through a field experiment from September to December 2016 with 163 vineyard farmers; we used the structural and midpoint methods to estimate the Cumulative Prospect Theory (CPT) parameters. Finally, we identify 5 anticipatory and 4 reactive adaptation options. The parameters indicate vineyard farmers are strongly risk averse and sensitive to losses, and their determinants are grape area, membership and subjective norms for risk aversion, and age, household size, and education for loss aversion. The main drivers for anticipatory adaptation are network, trust, time to market and area, and the main drivers for reactive adaptation are risk aversion, institutional trust, age and time to market.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275978&r=agr
  35. By: Vrachioli, M.; Stefanou, S.; Tzouvelekas, V.
    Abstract: The interest in promoting food and water security through development projects has evolved to the need for tools that can evaluate the impact of these projects, and to ensure that the projects reach the most vulnerable (Gertler et al., 2011). This study brings together the stochastic frontier model with impact evaluation methodology to measure the impact on farmers’ technical efficiency (TE) within a modern irrigation technology transition framework. In this study, we apply the Heckman (1979) and Greene (2010) models to correct for selectivity bias that arises from unobserved variables, and then we measure and compare technical efficiency scores (TE) resulting from these models. The empirical application will use data covering 56 small-scale greenhouse farms, mainly cultivating vegetables, from the Ierapetra Valley in the Southeast part of the island of Crete (Greece) for the cropping years from 2009 to 2013. The results reveal that the average technical efficiency for farmers who adopted sprinklers is lower than the group of non-adopters when the presence of selectivity bias cannot be rejected. This outcome can be explained by the fact that after the adoption of new technologies, adopters may need more time to learn how to use the technology efficiently.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275973&r=agr
  36. By: Ogundeji, A.; Mare, F.A.
    Abstract: The large difference between the producer price of a beef carcass and the retail prices of individual beef cuts raised concerns among producers. Producers believe that they were carrying all the risk and that retailers fixed their prices, irrespective of the market price at that stage. This study examines the price transmission mechanisms in the Bloemfontein beef market using the producer price and retail prices at four retail outlets collected over a period of 3 years. It further estimates the causality links between the producer and retail prices. The traditional (Engle-Granger) and standardized (Enders & Siklos) Augmented Dickey- Fuller procedures were used to test for co-integration and asymmetry in price transmission. Four competing models, namely, Engle-Granger, Threshold Autoregressive , Momentum Threshold Autoregressive, and Momentum Consistent TAR models were applied. The following results were found: asymmetric price transmission between producer and retail prices, the results on the flow of market information indicated that a flow of market information did exist in the markets of three of the four retailers. The price transmission relationship of two of the retailers are beneficial to the consumers, as the marketing margin declined over time, while the relationship of the other two retailers are detrimental to consumers.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275930&r=agr
  37. By: Wainger, L.; Ervin, D.
    Abstract: Citation : Wainger, L. and D. Ervin (editors). 2017. Synthesis Chapter - The Valuation of Ecosystem Services from Farms and Forests: Informing a systematic approach to quantifying benefits of conservation programs. The Council on Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics (C-FARE) Report No. 0114-301, Washington DC (March; available at http://www.cfare.org/publications/valuin g-ecosystem-services-from-farms-and-fore sts).
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Public Economics
    Date: 2017–03–22
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:cfarer:260677&r=agr
  38. By: Chialue, L.; Moustier, P.
    Abstract: To assess the main factors influencing Lao urban consumers perception of rice quality and safety, a conjoint analysis approach was conducted based on surveys on 300 consumers in 2010. Retailing points and organic certification have a major influence. The preferred retailing point for these attributes is the wet market, followed by minimarts then mobile vendors. Improving organic certification systems and maintaining traditional markets alongside minimarts are recommended. Key words: Consumer, food quality, safety, retail outlet, conjoint analysis
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:276030&r=agr
  39. By: Hoang, Hoa1mailto; Kimura, Shingo
    Abstract: A demand system is estimated separately for Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. Results showed that rice, the most important staple food in these countries, is a normal good. Food demand elasticity with respect to expenditure is less elastic for higher income country like Thailand while more elastic for lower income country like Myanmar. Market shocks such as a decrease in expenditure or an increase in rice prices tend to have the largest impacts on the prevalence of undernourishment in Myanmar and Vietnam. The study concludes with a recommendation for effective safety net programs.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261174&r=agr
  40. By: Eum, Jihyun; Sheldon, Ian M.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258369&r=agr
  41. By: Ogunnaike, Maria Gbemisola; Kehinde, Mojisola Olanike; Shittu, Adebayo M.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258426&r=agr
  42. By: Tefera, T.; Kassie, M.; Midingoyi, S.; Muriithi, B.
    Abstract: In this article, we estimate the impacts of a bundle of integrated pest management (IPM) practices on mango yield, mango net income, human health and the environment, using recent household survey data of mango growers in Kenya. We employ multinomial endogenous switching treatment regression model with an ordered probit selection rule to establish counterfactual outcomes, while controlling for potential selection bias. The environmental and human health effects of chemical insecticide use are quantified by employing the environmental impact quotient method. The analysis reveals that, while IPM-adopting farmers have higher mango yields and mango net income, they also use lower quantities of insecticide and cause less damage to the environment and to human health. In addition, switching from one IPM to multiple IPM practices generates even higher economic, environmental and human health benefits. The findings also reveal that variables such as training on insect pest management, exposure to IPM as proxied by the number of adopters within a village, membership of rural institutions, and income share from mango crops positively and significantly influence the probability of a farmer using a bundle of IPM practices. These positive outcomes can be achieved through providing adequate technical support and extension services to farmers.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275946&r=agr
  43. By: Schwab, Benjamin; Butsic, Van A.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258486&r=agr
  44. By: Schneider, K.; Masters, W.A.
    Abstract: This paper uses a novel survey instrument to identify distinct components of nutrition knowledge, and test for links between knowledge and dietary choices in Southern Malawi. Our first aim is to distinguish respondents’ familiarity with recommended behaviors, such as when to start breastfeeding or introduce solid foods, from respondents’ factual knowledge about mechanisms, such as whether biscuits or papaya and orange fruit or orange Fanta contribute more to future health. We find knowledge of nutrition behaviors to be strongly associated with more schooling, older age and being female, while knowledge of mechanisms is associated only with training and employment as a health professional. We then test whether this expanded definition of nutrition knowledge is associated with dietary intake when controlling for other factors, and find only suggestive evidence for significant links interacting with age of respondents. These findings point to the need for knowledge surveys and public health behavior-change campaigns to address the kinds of information that might have the most influence on actual behavior, potentially including the mechanisms involved in food composition, food safety and disease transmission.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275959&r=agr
  45. By: Xie, Chaoping; Grant, Jason; You, Wen
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258567&r=agr
  46. By: Tyner, W.; Zhao, X.; Taheripour, F.
    Abstract: In this study, we compare two of the most important models in the literature of estimating biofuels induced land use change (ILUC) emissions, GTAP-BIO and GLOBIOM. Since GTAP-BIO is publicly accessible while GLOBIOM currently is not, we use biofuel pathways from the results documented in the most recent GLOBIOM report and compare them using GTAP-BIO with the same specifications. Five EU biofuel pathways, including sugar beet ethanol, starchy crop ethanol, rapeseed oil biodiesel, soy oil biodiesel, and palm oil biodiesel, are tested. The results from GTAP-BIO show lower ILUC emissions for each of the five pathways. The gap in ILUC emission values between the two models is larger for vegetable oil biodiesel pathways than for sugar and starch ethanol pathways. Simulation results are compared to the extent GLOBIOM results were available in the documentation. The major drivers of differences in the two models are livestock rebound response, palm related issues (e.g., palm oil yield and peat oxidation factor), and foregone sequestration on abandoned land. The analysis shows that the strong livestock rebound effect, low palm oil yield, and high abandoned land foregone sequestration factor may lead to an overestimation of ILUC emissions in GLOBIOM.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275967&r=agr
  47. By: Van Hoyweghen, K.; Van Den Broeck, G.; Maertens, M.
    Abstract: This paper uses household-level panel data from two survey rounds in Senegal, to estimate the impact of rural off-farm wage employment on household welfare and rural development. Our case-study contains a dynamic off-farm wage employment sector, including agricultural and non-agricultural, casual and yearround employment. We use four welfare indicators, household income, poverty, variability of income, and vulnerability, and two econometric models. Overall, we find that off-farm wage employment increases the welfare of rural households. Our results refute the idea that casual employment is not able to lift the poor and vulnerable out of poverty. In addition, casual and short-term employment decreases the variability of income, which implies an income-smoothing effects for rural households facing downwards shocks and liquidity constraints. We find that when households are casual employed over a longer period of time, they experience a self-employment income growth. This can be due to knowledge spill-over effects, investment effects, or a combination of both. We are carefully positive about the positive impact casual employment can have on rural development. Our results imply that policymakers should take into account agricultural and casual wage employment, as these are accessible for poor households and our results indicate that it can improve their welfare.
    Keywords: Farm Management, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275888&r=agr
  48. By: Xia, Tian; Li, Xianghong
    Keywords: Industrial Organization, Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258423&r=agr
  49. By: Henderson, J. Vernon; Storeygard, Adam; Deichmann, Uwe
    Abstract: This paper documents strong but differentiated links between climate and urbanization in large panels of districts and cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, which has dried substantially in the past fifty years. The key dimension of heterogeneity is whether cities are likely to have manufacturing for export outside their regions, as opposed to being exclusively market towns providing local services to agricultural hinterlands. In regions where cities are likely to be manufacturing centers (25% of our sample), drier conditions increase urbanization and total urban incomes. There, urban migration provides an "escape" from negative agricultural moisture shocks. However, in the remaining market towns (75% of our sample), cities just service agriculture. Reduced farm incomes from negative shocks reduce demand for urban services and derived demand for urban labor. There, drying has little impact on urbanization or total urban incomes. Lack of structural transformation in Africa inhibits a better response to climate change.
    Keywords: Africa; Urbanization; Climate Change
    JEL: O10 O55 Q54 R12
    Date: 2017–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:67654&r=agr
  50. By: Huang, Jiaoyuan; Shah, Farhed A.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258349&r=agr
  51. By: Fiamohe, R.; Agossadou, A.J.; Kinkpe, T.
    Abstract: Consumers in Benin developed strong preference to imported white rice. It is suggested that upgrading local rice value chain will require efforts on post-harvest segments by adding value to the product. Therefore, efforts have been deployed in the recent years to upgrade the value chain. Using experimental auction based on Becker-DegrootMarshack (BDM) mechanism combined with the endow-and-upgrade and a two stage approach, this study assessed: i) consumers’ willingness to upgrade and to pay for different parboiled rice types, ii) the competitiveness of local parboiled rice relative to imported parboiled and iii) the price premium of each improved processing technology. Results show that consumers will accept parboiled rice only if it is high quality rice. Among the local parboiled rice, the one produced with GEM parboiling technology, milled with rubber roll mill and sorted with optical sorter is more competitive than imported rice. Among technologies, optical sorter is the most important in the parboiled rice value chain upgrading. Econometric results revealed that rice attributes and information exchange on the benefit of parboiled rice are the most important to be considered in the value chain upgrading. Results suggest to combine improved processing technologies for an effective value chain upgrading.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275966&r=agr
  52. By: Ulimwengu, J.; Makombe, T.
    Abstract: With increasingly large shares of public expenditures going toward social sectors in agriculture-based economies, the issue becomes how to design a budget allocation scheme that maximizes agricultural productivity-enhancing effects of social expenditures. This study examines the impact of various subtypes of household health spending on agricultural labor productivity using data from 505 households in five Rwandan districts. Our findings confirm that change in agricultural productivity can be driven by change in marginal productivity of inputs induced by households’ health status. The latter are significantly impacted by households’ own social expenditures. This then suggests that there is a way to bundle social expenditures in order to compensate for the shortage of resources allocated to agriculture and therefore to harness their productivity-enhancing potential.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:276000&r=agr
  53. By: Zeng, Di; Umberger, Wendy J.; Rupa, Jesmin Ara
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258470&r=agr
  54. By: Yu, Jisang; Hendricks, Nathan P.
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258336&r=agr
  55. By: Kamiche Zegarra, J.; Bravo-Ureta, B.
    Abstract: This article analyzes how information use affect farm productivity and efficiency. Our hypothesis is that farmers make better decisions when they use information (for example, choosing a high value crop combination or selling the products at higher prices) and that will enhance on productivity and efficiency. We use two techniques to mitigate the possible biases generated by observable and unobservable variables: Propensity Score Matching (PSM) for the first one and the stochastic production function (SPF) approach corrected by sample selection for the second one. We take advantage of the underused Peruvian National Agricultural Survey (ENA) which includes information about 12 877 farmers located in the Andean region. Our results show that farmers who use information are systematically nearer to their frontier than those who do not use information (0.50 vs. 0.47, on average). The analysis by plot size and age suggest that farmers with smaller plots and those who are middle age are more efficient in the users group; however, the relation is not clear among the nonusers of information. Thus, more research is needed about the complementarity of the agricultural inputs and information use. These results can contribute to the design of a cost-effectiveness evaluation of information extension programs.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275870&r=agr
  56. By: Liu, Y.
    Abstract: This paper examines the impact of agricultural cooperatives working as a marketing channel, and the determinant of members’ decision to sell products through agricultural based on household-level data of agricultural cooperatives members from poor rural areas in Sichuan province, in China. Employing different treatment effect estimators, i.e. PSM and IPWRA, we find that selling products through agricultural cooperatives has a positive and statistically significant effect on both farmers’ annual total household income and farm income. It was also found that the effect on farm income (around 180%) is higher than annual total household income (around 20%). Comparing the difference between ATTs and ATEs, we could suggest that the efficiency of agricultural cooperatives can be improved by encouraging non-sellers to sell products through agricultural cooperatives, which is possible to do according to the results of a probit model. Following empirical results obtained using the probit model, we conclude that farm size, farming machine, distance to market, credit constraint, sale condition, motivation to participate in agricultural cooperatives and the knowledge of agricultural cooperatives positively and significant influence the probability of a member selling products through agricultural cooperatives, while the market information ownership shows a negative significant effect on the choice.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Marketing
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275898&r=agr
  57. By: Wang, Haoluan; Swallow, Brent M.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258537&r=agr
  58. By: Kalibwani, R.
    Abstract: This paper provides insight into the relationship between technical efficiency of maize farming and household wealth indicators in Uganda. The study uses national panel data in 2005/06 and 2009/10, and a stochastic frontier production function model is specified for the maize farming households. Up to 2,295 households were found to have grown maize in 2005/06, and 2,343 households in 2009/10 from the data sets. The results show that up to 86% of the maize farming households attained on average low mean efficiency scores below 0.5. While inorganic fertilizer was found to be important in contributing to maize productivity and therefore technical efficiency, the number of households using it between the two time periods was found to reduce albeit not significantly. The number using organic fertilizer though, significantly increased (1%). Household wealth is found to be significantly (1% level) associated with a reduction in technical efficiency. The study recommends interventions targeted at poor rural households to improve maize output markets so as to competitively reward household investment in production, and subsequently generate household wealth. This would make maize production attractive to the producers, motivating them to make necessary investment in inorganic fertilizer and other purchased inputs.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275889&r=agr
  59. By: Yi, Jing; Richardson, James W.; Bryant, Henry L.; Worqlul, Abeyou W.
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258512&r=agr
  60. By: Houser, Dwight M.; Karali, Berna
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Demand and Price Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258500&r=agr
  61. By: Abolhasani, L.; Tajabadi, M.; Shahnoushi Forushahi, N.
    Abstract: Contrary to the traditional supply policies, the integrated water resources management concentrates mainly on demand policies in which water tariffs are the most effective tools in achieving economic efficiency through management of water consumption. It is therefore important for policy makers and water managers to understand price elasticity for water demand presenting how changes in water tariffs affect water consumption. In this study, we reviewed 21 empirical case studies in Iran, including journal articles, master thesis and PhD dissertations, from which 65 estimates of price elasticity for residual water demand were collected. Using t-tests, the collected estimates of price elasticity found to be statistically different. Applying the meta-analysis approach that is focused on the two main objectives of publication bias and publication heterogeneity, it is attempted to explain the heterogeneity in the reported studies. Publication bias was tested using different techniques of meta-analysis. Using meta regression, impacts of theoretical specification, model specification, data characteristics and population the heterogeneity across the reported elasticity estimates are examined. Inclusion of income, use of time-series datasets, natural logarithm function of demand and application of stone greay theory are all found to affect the estimate of the price elasticity. The population density and use of OLS technique to estimate the demand parameters do not significantly influence the estimate of the price elasticity.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275890&r=agr
  62. By: Vollmer, Teresa; Von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan
    Abstract: To know about the pricing process in agricultural spot and futures markets is important for every market participant. However, literature for the European market is rare. In this article we analyse price discovery in the European wheat market and focus especially on time periods with price turmoil. We find that price discovery is subject to structural changes over time and that the pattern of dominance in the pricing process alternates between the spot and futures market. Results suggest that neither price turmoil nor a change in the liquidity of the futures market is solely responsible for these structural changes.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261135&r=agr
  63. By: Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Devadoss, Stephen
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258436&r=agr
  64. By: Owoo, Nkechi S.; Upton, Joanna; Bageant, Elizabeth
    Keywords: International Development, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258469&r=agr
  65. By: MacLachlan, Matthew; Ramos, Sean; Hungerford, Ashley; Edwards, Seanicaa
    Abstract: Natural disasters can cause income losses for livestock producers by diminishing grazing capacity of land, driving disease, or directly causing livestock losses. Under the Agricultural Act of 2014, three disaster assistance programs for livestock administered by the Farm Service Agency became permanent, and their eligibility requirements were generally relaxed. These disaster programs include the Livestock Forage Disaster Program, the Livestock Indemnity Program, and the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program. Existing legislation—the Animal Health Protection Act—also authorized indemnity payment programs during the control of infectious disease outbreaks. This report examines how these programs work and which States and counties have farms that have received program payments. The report describes regional differences in payment delivery and shows how outlays vary greatly by year and program. Regional differences in production and natural disasters has led to differences in program payments across States and counties.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uersib:276251&r=agr
  66. By: Mei, Jiayou; Zhang, Wendong; Hayes, Dermot J.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258461&r=agr
  67. By: Paudel, Jayash; Crago, Christine L.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258464&r=agr
  68. By: Ji, Xinde; Cobourn, Kelly M.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Agribusiness, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258377&r=agr
  69. By: Namonje-Kapembwa, Thelma; Chapoto, Antony
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Production Economics, International Development
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258515&r=agr
  70. By: Dogbe, Wisdom; Gil, Jose Maria
    Abstract: Spain is likely to miss it Kyoto target in 2020 if it does not shift emphasis from labor taxes towards environmental taxes. Compared to supply-side measures, demand-side measures have proven to be more efficient in reducing GHG emissions. We assess demand-side Pigovian/CO2-eq tax on food CO2-eq reduction, welfare and diet quality in Spain based on different social costs and discount rates. Elasticities for simulations are calculated from a complete EASI demand system. Results show CO2-eq reduction are proportional to taxes. Though, taxes affect diet quality positively, it lowers household welfare indicating a trade-off between emissions goals and household´s welfare.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261416&r=agr
  71. By: Miyamoto, Bruno C. B.; Gori-Maia, Alexandre; Ruiz Garcia, Junior
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Productivity Analysis, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258353&r=agr
  72. By: Heo, Seong-Yoon; Lee, Kyei-Im; Zulauf, Carl R.; Noh, Seung-Chul; Kim, Sang-Hyo
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258503&r=agr
  73. By: Wang, Haigui; Zhuo, Ni; Ye, Chunhui
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258455&r=agr
  74. By: Kosenius, A.-K.; Ollikainen, M.
    Abstract: This paper examines the motivations of participants in a large-scale pilot project that develops a new agrienvironmental measure, gypsum treatment of arable fields, to reduce phosphorus loads to the Baltic Sea. We build a general model of crop production that allows for three motivations: profit maximization, utility from agricultural innovation, and stewardship towards the nature. They all are present in the sample, proved by farmer survey and confirmatory factor analysis. Strong profit motivation relates to large gypsumtreated area and perceived easiness of gypsum as a water protection measure, and strong environmental motivation to environmentally friendly cultivation technologies.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:276048&r=agr
  75. By: van Kooten, G. Cornelis
    Abstract: In this study, the price of carbon offset credits is used for incentivizing a reduction in the release of CO2 emissions and an increase in sequestration of CO2 through forestry activities. A forest management model representative of the southern interior of British Columbia is described. The objective is to maximize net discounted returns to commercial timber operations plus the benefits of managing carbon fluxes. The model tracks carbon in living trees, organic matter, and post-harvest carbon pools. The decision about which forestry activities generate carbon offset credits and how many is essentially a political and not a scientific one.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261275&r=agr
  76. By: Doidge, Mary; Feng, Hongli; Hennessy, David A.
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258457&r=agr
  77. By: Mei, Yingdan; Gao, Li; Zhang, Wendong
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Production Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258535&r=agr
  78. By: Fan, Linlin
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, Industrial Organization
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258404&r=agr
  79. By: Nerhagen, Lena (CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI)); Forsstedt, Sara (The Swedish Transport Agency); Edvardsson, Karin (The Swedish Transport Agency)
    Abstract: To achieve effective regulation, the OECD and the European Commission recommend the use of regulatory impact assessment (RIA). The full RIA process has however not been implemented in Sweden. There is for example a lack of established practices at the national level for the analysis of risk in regulatory work. Instead, soft law in the form of management by objective systems is guiding transport and environmental policy. These systems were introduced in the end of the 1990s following the international discussion on the precautionary principle. According to findings in other countries, policy making based on the precautionary principle may result in unexpected and unwanted consequences and therefore, based on a literature review and an assessment of current practices in transport regulation in Sweden, we suggest the use of an initial screening of hazards in regulatory work. We also apply the proposed method to four transport related case studies to illustrate how an initial assessment can provide the basis for an informed discussion on what hazards to counteract with regulation and on what grounds.
    Keywords: precautionary principle; risk assessment; hazards; regulatory impact assessment
    JEL: R40
    Date: 2018–09–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:ctswps:2018_014&r=agr
  80. By: Erickson, Kenneth W.; Featherstone, Allen M.; Subedi, Dipak; Nehring, Richard F.; Harris, James Michael
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258488&r=agr
  81. By: Ning, Xin; Grant, Jason; Peterson, Everett B.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Demand and Price Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258244&r=agr
  82. By: Naseem, Anwar; Oehmke, James F.; Anderson, Jock; Mbaye, Samba; Pray, Carl; Nagarajan, Latha; Moss, Charles B.; Post, Lori
    Keywords: International Development, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258549&r=agr
  83. By: Khanal, Aditya R.; Mishra, Ashok K.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258510&r=agr
  84. By: Jiang, Linli; Zhang, Junbiao; Wang, Holly H.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258460&r=agr
  85. By: Kim, Jongwoo; Mason, Nicole M.
    Keywords: International Development, Production Economics, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258262&r=agr
  86. By: Brown, Jason P.; Wojan, Timothy R.; Lambert, Dayton M.
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258354&r=agr
  87. By: Wrenn, Douglas H.; Klaiber, Allen; Newburn, David
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258578&r=agr
  88. By: Dong, Diansheng; Stewart, Hayden; McLaughlin, Patrick W.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258195&r=agr
  89. By: Cleary, Rebecca; Goetz, Stephan J.; Thilmany McFadden, Dawn D.; Ge, Houtian
    Keywords: Marketing, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258538&r=agr
  90. By: Nguyen, Hong - Ron; Ngo, Quang - Thanh; Nguyen, Ngoc - Danh
    Abstract: The current study uses a unique balanced panel of 3,922 households between 2008 and 2010 to examine the extent to which rice production in Vietnam is affected by natural disasters and how coping strategies lessen the negative effects of natural disaster, using a fixed effects model that controls for time invariant farm heterogeneity. With regard to natural disaster, we find evidence of the negative inter-temporal occurrence and negative inter-temporal severity effects, and the negative current occurrence one as well. With regard to coping strategies, we find various evidence of current, inter-temporal coping-occurrence and coping severity effects, depending on kinds of coping strategies.
    Keywords: Current and inter-temporal occurrence effects, current and inter-temporal severity effects, current and intertemporal coping-occurrence effects, current and inter-temporal coping-severity effects, natural disaster, rice production, Vietnam.
    JEL: C23 Q12 Q54
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:88701&r=agr
  91. By: Yu, Yang; Jaenicke, Edward C.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258355&r=agr
  92. By: Siami-Namini, Sima; Hudson, Michael D.; Trindade, A. Alexandre
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258325&r=agr
  93. By: Obembe, Oladipo S.
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Risk and Uncertainty, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258326&r=agr
  94. By: Yu, Ling; You, Wen; Hill, Jennie
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258499&r=agr
  95. By: Dzanku, F.M.; Osei, R.D.
    Abstract: We carried out a randomized controlled experiment in the Sikasso Region of Mali to test the hypotheses that (a) pre– and post-harvest training lowers the probability of crop losses and reduces household food insecurity; (b) post-training reminders have an even greater impact on reducing crop losses and lowering food insecurity; and (c) post-training reminders during specific times when such information needs to be applied reduced the probability of crop losses and lowers food insecurity over and above what could be achieved through training only. Aside post-harvest losses for which we could not reject the null hypothesis that post-training reminders have no impact, we easily reject the null that farmers who received only faceto- face training and those who received post-training reminders have identical outcomes. The null hypothesis that farmers who received only training are not different (with respect to our outcomes of interest) from those who received neither training nor reminders could not be rejected, except in the case of timely harvesting. These results suggest that going beyond training to providing timely reminders through voice messages could boost adoption and improve household welfare. Besides, the reminders intervention is relatively inexpensive, compared with traditional extension approaches.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275924&r=agr
  96. By: Wahl, Thomas I.; Bai, Junfei; Seale, James L.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258381&r=agr
  97. By: Kovacs, Kent; Lee, Ji Yong; Nayga, Rodolfo M.; Henry, Christopher; Tsiboe, Francis; Krutz, Larry
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural Finance, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258518&r=agr
  98. By: Chebil, A.; Frija, A.; Bennouna, B.
    Abstract: In this paper, we assess the effects of water shortage on the competitiveness of major traded commodities in Tunisia. Based on a sample of 170 wheat farms and 51 orange farms, located in the main producing regions of the country, stochastic production frontier functions were used to estimate changes in marginal water value under different levels of water availability. These values are then used as opportunity costs and utilized in the calculation of Domestic Resource Cost (DRC) coefficients. Empirical results show that Tunisia has a comparative advantage (DRC<1) in the production of orange. However, Tunisia exhibited a DRC greater than one for wheat. Results of sensitivity analysis demonstrate the degree of deterioration of competitiveness in wheat and orange production under reduced water availability. At 50% decreases in water availability, DRC ratio increases from 1.24 to 8.27 for wheat, and from 0.91 to 1.13 for orange. However, improvement of irrigation water efficiency leads to a relative increase in the DRC for both commodities. Therefore, further efforts to optimize management practices of irrigation water at field and farm levels are needed. This could be achieved through better irrigation scheduling and deficit irrigation strategy.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development
    Date: 2018–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae18:275874&r=agr
  99. By: Feng, Hongli; Wang, Tong; Hennessy, David A.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Farm Management
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258571&r=agr
  100. By: Canales Medina, Elizabeth; Bergtold, Jason S.; Williams, Jeffery R.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agribusiness, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258558&r=agr
  101. By: Britwum, Kofi; Yiannaka, Amalia
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258532&r=agr
  102. By: Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob; Lunduka, Rodney W.; Kanyamuka, Joseph Samuel; Jumbe, Charles; Kaiyatsa, Stevier; Chamberlin, Jordan
    Keywords: International Development, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258391&r=agr
  103. By: Chen, Lijun; Parcell, Joe L.
    Keywords: Marketing, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258472&r=agr
  104. By: Valtiala, Juho P.; Rezitis, Anthony N.
    Abstract: This study examined whether processors and retailers have market power in the Finnish dairy chain. Both the dairy processing and the retail sector are highly concentrated in Finland, and market imperfections in the chain are not well known. The results indicate that the retailers have market power over the consumers in the retail market but the processing market is competitive. According to the results, the retailers employ full mark-up in the retail market. It is emphasised that market power in the Finnish dairy chain should be further studied with different approaches to gain more evidence for market power.
    Keywords: Industrial Organization
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261419&r=agr
  105. By: Boaitey, Albert; Goddard, Ellen
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258231&r=agr
  106. By: Kerssenbrock, Patricia; Hartmann, Monika; Hirsch, Stefan
    Keywords: Industrial Organization, Agribusiness, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258385&r=agr
  107. By: Eusébio, Gabriela Dos Santos; Gori-Maia, Alexandre; Silveira, Rodrigo Lanna F.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258551&r=agr
  108. By: Radostina Popova (University of Forestry)
    Abstract: The paper attempts to characterize the performance and problems in Forest Industry in Republic of Bulgaria. It contains general characteristic like technological and economic characteristics of the Forest Industry in Bulgaria, technological operations and wood processes, trends of the furniture in EU as a main final product in the Forest Industry. It presents the largest enterprises and the biggest foreign suppliers also and countries for export and import. The paper also presents the performance of the Forest industry enterprises in Bulgaria in strategical management areas like quality, ICT, financing, marketing, internet, internationalization and innovations.The methods applied include statistical analyses of production, value added and employee, expert assessments as well as generalization survey's results from a focus group of managers of Forest industry SMEs, provided in 2016. Some recommendations are drawn in areas of strategic management (technologies and information, innovation cooperation) and in areas of production and operations management.
    Keywords: Forest Industry; Wood processes; Woodworking; Furniture manufacturing; Strategic management; Production management; Innovation cooperation.
    JEL: L68 L73 M11
    Date: 2018–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sek:iacpro:7208885&r=agr
  109. By: Gooch, Elizabeth; Gale, Fred
    Abstract: Chinese companies are increasing their investments in foreign agricultural and food assets. Their broad aims are to gain profits for Chinese investors while achieving national food security and projecting China’s influence abroad. While the United States is the largest supplier of China’s agricultural imports, it has not been a major target of Chinese agricultural investment. Chinese investors tend to enter less-developed countries where there are few competitors, potential to raise productivity using Chinese technology, and potential to diversify suppliers of Chinese imports. A few companies with access to financing from Chinese banks are pursuing mergers, acquisitions, and partnerships with companies in more developed markets. These investments reflect changes in China’s demand for food and its need for upgrades in technology and management, but most ventures have modest impacts on agricultural trade.
    Keywords: Financial Economics
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uersib:276237&r=agr
  110. By: Sheng, Di; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.; Menard, Jamey; Lambert, Lixia He; Hughes, David W.; Clark, Christopher D.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258194&r=agr
  111. By: Fan, Yubing; Massey, Raymond E.; Park, Seong C.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Land Economics/Use, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258561&r=agr
  112. By: Fan, Yubing; McCann, Laura M.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Productivity Analysis, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258458&r=agr
  113. By: Cai, Xiaowei; Volpe, Richard J.; Schroeter, Christiane; Mancino, Lisa
    Keywords: Industrial Organization, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258471&r=agr
  114. By: Jovanovic, Nina; Katare, Bhagyashree; Lim, Kar Ho
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258331&r=agr
  115. By: DeLay, Nathan D.; Chouinard, Hayley H.; Walters, Cory G.; Wandschneider, Philip R.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Industrial Organization
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258357&r=agr
  116. By: Liesivaara, Petri; Myyrä, Sami
    Abstract: Insurance premium subsidies and disaster relief payments are government actions that can help to smooth farmers’ incomes between years. In the EU crop insurance based on public-private partnership is promoted. We present an analysis based on farmers’ stated preferences with split data approach of crop insurance and disaster relief provided by the government. Results reveal that farmers’ willingness to pay for crop insurance is conditional on the prospect for government disaster relief.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261178&r=agr
  117. By: Jones Ritten, Chian A.; Ehmke, Mariah D.; Thunstrom, Linda; Beiermann, Jenny; Mcleod, Donald
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Marketing, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258448&r=agr
  118. By: Saghaian, Sayed H.; Nemati, Mehdi; Walters, Cory G.; Chen, Bo
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Marketing, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258240&r=agr
  119. By: Alhassan, Mustapha; Gustafson, Christopher R.; Schoengold, Karina
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258432&r=agr
  120. By: Guimaraes, Jonathan S.; Cruz, Jose Cesar
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Marketing, Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258480&r=agr
  121. By: Kwon, Jisoo; Kim, Hyeon-Woong; Yoo, Do-il
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Demand and Price Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258222&r=agr
  122. By: Bairagi, Subir K.; Mishra, Ashok K.; Giri, Anil
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258484&r=agr
  123. By: Maligalig, Rio L.; Demont, Matty; Umberger, Wendy J.; Peralta, Alexandra
    Keywords: Farm Management, Agricultural and Food Policy, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258459&r=agr
  124. By: Bozzola, Martina; DiFalco, Salvatore; Finger, Robert
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258365&r=agr
  125. By: Baffoe-Bonnie, Anthony; Kostandini, Gentian
    Keywords: Production Economics, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258230&r=agr
  126. By: Bawa, Siraj G.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258485&r=agr
  127. By: Martin L. Weitzman; Bjart Holtsmark (Statistics Norway)
    Abstract: Linkage of cap-and-trade systems is typically advocated by economists on a general analogy with the beneficial linking of free-trade areas and on the specific grounds that linkage will ensure cost effectiveness among the linked jurisdictions. An appropriate and widely accepted specification for the damages of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions within a relatively short (say 5-10 year) period is that marginal damages for each jurisdiction are constant (although they can differ among jurisdictions). With this defensible assumption, the analysis is significantly clarified and yields simple closedform expressions for all CO2 permit prices. Some implications for linked and unlinked voluntary CO2 cap-and-trade systems are derived and discussed.
    Keywords: linkage; cap and trade; pollution; climate change
    JEL: Q50 Q51 Q52 Q54 Q58
    Date: 2018–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ssb:dispap:883&r=agr
  128. By: Lai, John; Widmar, Nicole; Wolf, Christopher A.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258340&r=agr
  129. By: Alia, Didier Y.; Zheng, Yuqing; Kusunose, Yoko; Reed, Michael R.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258368&r=agr
  130. By: Zhang, Chao; Sun, Yiduo; Hu, Ruifa
    Keywords: Production Economics, Health Economics and Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258214&r=agr
  131. By: Enjolras, Geoffroy; Aubert, Magali
    Abstract: This article focuses on factors which incite farmers to sell their production at the retail level, a marketing channel that is currently enjoying renewed interest. Based on data from the Farm Accountancy Data Network 2006-2014, we establish the contrasting profiles of farms that sell their production directly to consumers: they are smaller, permanent-labor-intensive and propose an increase range of produces compared to other kinds of farms. While we highlight sectorial differences, the common point of these farms is to use fewer pesticides, which is consistent with the quality signal sent to consumers. Implications in terms of public policy are suggested.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261432&r=agr
  132. By: Cho, Clare; Volpe, Richard J.
    Keywords: Industrial Organization, Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258517&r=agr
  133. By: Ifft, Jennifer; Jodlowski, Margaret
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2018–04–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:scc018:276148&r=agr
  134. By: Taylor, Mykel R.; Tonsor, Glynn T.; Wilson, Candice
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258190&r=agr
  135. By: Richard, Jessica; Tyler, Mark; Burdine, Kenneth
    Abstract: Richard (2017) found evidence revealing MPP impact differences due to milk and feed market differences across the dairy production regions. The Margin Protection Program is likely to be reformed in the 2018 Farm Bill in order to address producer’s concerns. There are many approaches to analyze potential new policies. This paper will document recent proposals and develop an additional approach to reforming the federal dairy safety net. The cases of New Mexico and Wisconsin will be examined for how a shift in the range of margins protected by MPP might affect risk reduction.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Livestock Production/Industries, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2017–07–31
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:260835&r=agr
  136. By: Cobourn, Kelly M.; Ji, Xinde; Mooney, Sian; Crescenti, Neil
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258271&r=agr
  137. By: Ha, Kim; Atallah, Shadi S.; Bazzani, Claudia; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258330&r=agr
  138. By: Kang, Moon Jeong; Siry, Jacek; Colson, Gregory J.; Ferreira, Susana
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258475&r=agr
  139. By: Lee, Gi-Eu; Rollins, Kimberly S.; Singletary, Loretta
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2017–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258225&r=agr
  140. By: Cain, Stephen; Dharmasena, Senarath; Martin, Daniel
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Productivity Analysis, Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258421&r=agr
  141. By: Wang, Yanghao; Cakir, Metin
    Keywords: Industrial Organization, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258360&r=agr
  142. By: Belasco, Eric
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2018–04–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:scc018:276147&r=agr
  143. By: Snyder, Jason E.; Tschirley, David L.; Reardon, Thomas A.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, International Development, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258410&r=agr
  144. By: Dusoruth, Vaneesha; Peterson, Hikaru Hanawa
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258473&r=agr
  145. By: Bittmann, Thomas; Loy, Jens-Peter; Anders, Sven
    Abstract: The objective of this paper is to model and estimate the effect of product differentiation on retail pass-through of cost shocks. We use a model with common and idiosyncratic costs and apply it to Canadian market prices for ready to eat soups. We measure product differentiation with a distance vector adding a spatial dimension to the approach. We find that more differentiated products show higher prices, lower cost pass-through of common price shocks, higher cost pass-through of idiosyncratic cost shocks, and a more sluggish price adjustment.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2017–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae17:261145&r=agr
  146. By: Stevens, Andrew W.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–07–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea17:258440&r=agr

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