nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2017‒01‒29
sixty-one papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Climate risk and food security in Guatemala By Renato Vargas; Pamela Escobar; Maynor Cabrera; Javier Cabrera; Violeta Hernández; Vivian Guzmán; Martin Cicowiez
  2. Cost Pass Through and Welfare Effects of the Food Safety Modernization Act By Ferrier, Peyton; Zhen, Chen; Bovay, John
  3. Domestic Resource Cost in Philippine Agriculture: Measuring Global Competitiveness of Key Commodities By Briones, Roehlano M.
  4. Trade Impacts of Agricultural Support in the EU By Matthews, Alan; Salvatici, Luca; Scoppola, Margherita
  5. The agricultural roots of industrial development: ‘forward linkages’ in reform era China By Samuel Marden
  6. EU – China food trade perspectives By Kostadinov, Anton
  7. The Local Impacts of Agricultural Subsidies: Evidence from the Canadian Prairies By Bollman, Ray; Ferguson, Shon
  8. Estimating agricultural production in Scania, 1702–1881 : User guide for the Historical Database of Scanian Agriculture and overall results By Olsson, Mats; Svensson, Patrick
  9. Misallocation, Selection and Productivity: A Quantitative Analysis with Panel Data from China By Tasso Adamopoulos; Loren Brandt; Jessica Leight; Diego Restuccia
  10. Take what you can: property rights, contestability and conflict By Thiemo Fetzer; Samuel Marden
  11. Winter is Coming: The Long-Run Effects of Climate Change on Conflict, 1400-1900 By Murat Iyigun; Nathan Nunn; Nancy Qian
  12. Young Food Consumers: How do Children Respond to Point-of-Purchase Interventions? By Cash, Sean B.; McAlister, Anna R.
  13. Electrification and Welfare of Poor Households in Rural India By Aditi Bhattacharyya; Daisy Das; Arkadipta Ghosh
  14. ASSESSING PROVINCIAL-LEVEL DEMAND FOR FOOD QUANTITY AND QUALITY IN CHINA: AN EASI DEMAND SYSTEM APPROACH By Mendis, Sachintha; Hovhannisyan, Vardges
  15. Effects of Imperfect Information on 2014 Farm Bill Program Enrollment By Taylor, Mykel; Wilson, Candice
  16. Russian agricultural-food exports and food security: how two tasks are combined By Rylko, Dmitri
  17. Capturing a Value-Added Niche Market: Articulation of Local Organic Grain By Baker, Brian; Russell, June
  18. The United States WTO Complaint on China’s Agricultural Domestic Support: Preliminary Observations (Paper) By Brink, Lars; Orden, David
  19. Does the farm input subsidy program displace commercial fertilizer sales? Empirical evidence from agro-dealers in Malawi By Kaiyatsa, Stevier
  20. Going Green To Be Seen: The Case of Biodiversity Protection on Farmland By Rupayan Pal; Prasenjit Banerjee; Ada Wossink
  21. Child Age and Gender Differences in Food Security in a Low-Income Inner-City Population By Robert A. Moffitt; David C. Ribar
  22. Vertical coordination in agri-food chains –Implications for Policy and Trade By Dries, Liesbeth
  23. Investigation of Relationship Between World Food Prices and Energy Price: A Panel SUR Approach By Shahnoushi, Naser; Sayed, Saghaian; Hezareh, Reza; Tirgari Seraji, Mohammad
  24. The Potential Benefits of Transboundary Co-operation in Georgia and Azerbaijan: Kura River Basin By Pierre Strosser; Gloria De Paoli; Tatiana Efimova
  25. Recent development in agri-food policy and trade: case of Moldova By Stratan, Alexandru
  26. Does Vertical Integration Increase Efficiency? A Look at Ethanol Plants in the Center-South of Brazil By Sant'Anna, Ana Claudia; Bergtold, Jason; Featherstone, Allen; Caldas, Marcellus; Granco, Gabriel
  27. Land tenure policy and women’s off-farm employment in rural China By Hongqin Chang; Jing Liu; Yanyun Gao
  28. Complexity and the Economics of Climate Change: a Survey and a Look Forward By Tomas Balint; Francesco Lamperti; Mauro Napoletano; Antoine Mandel; Andrea Roventini; Sandro Sapio
  29. Russian Crisis and its Impact on Agriculture and the Food Industry in Latvia By Pilvere, Irina; Nipers, Aleksejs
  30. Framework for assessing the socio-economic impacts of Bt maize cultivation By Jonas Kathage; Manuel Gómez-Barbero; Emilio Rodríguez-Cerezo
  31. Size and Sector Effects in the Performance of Agricultural Cooperatives: The Case of Georgia By Kakulia, Nino; Kochlamazashvili, Irakli; Mamardashvili, Mamardashvili
  32. The Effect of Market Segmentation on Consumer Welfare: The Case of Organic and Conventional Fruits and Vegetables By McFadden, Brandon; Mullally, Conner
  33. The New Frontier: Welfare Effects of Foreign Biofuel Investments in Africa (Case Study: Sierra Leone) By Lakoh, Kepifri; Perrin, Richard K.; Fulginiti, Lilyan
  34. Agricultural policy and trade in Central Asia and the South Caucasus in the context of WTO rules By Brink, Lars
  35. Consumer Preference and Market Simulations of Food and Non-Food GMO Introductions By Berning, Joshua; Campbell, Ben
  36. Optimal Food Waste: Taxes and Government Incentives By Katare, Bhagyashree; Serebrennikov, Dmytro; Wang, H. Holly; Wetzstein, Michael
  37. Transformation of agricultural value chains and collective action in irrigated areas By Djanibekov, Nodir; Amirova, Iroda; Burkitbayeva, Saule
  38. Efecto comercial sobre las exportaciones de las medidas sanitarias y fitosanitarias: el caso de la carne bovina y los productos agrícolas genéticamente modificados (GMO) By Natalia Ferreira-Coímbra; Juan Labraga
  39. The Architecture of Food Safety Control in the European Union and the Eurasian Economic Union By Sedik, David; Ulbricht, Carl; Dzhamankulov, Nuritdin
  40. Endogenous Formation of Agricultural Policies in Federal States: The Case of Russia By Kvartiuk, Vasyl
  41. Working Paper 235 - Social Networks, Agricultural Innovations, and Farm Productivity in Ethiopia By AfDB AfDB
  42. AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COUPONS AND MARKET SHARES OF NATIONAL BRAND AND PRIVATE LABEL FOOD PRODUCTS By Meloyan, Artak; Bakhtavoryan, Rafael
  43. Estimating location values of agricultural land By Georg Helbing; Zhiwei Shen; Martin Odening; Matthias Ritter
  44. Patterns and Processes of Pasture to Crop Conversion in Brazil: Evidence from Mato Grosso State By Avery S. Cohn; Juliana Gil; Thomas Berger; Heitor Pellegrina; Chantal Toledo
  45. Emergent Uncertainty in Regional Integration -Economic impacts of alternative RTA scenarios- By Kenichi Kawasaki
  46. Regional Agricultural Innovation System(RAIS): Transferability of Korean Experiences to Uzbekistan By Kim, Kyung-Ryang
  47. Features of Negotiations on Access to the EU Market for Agrifood Products By Piatnytskyi, Valeriy
  48. U.S. Demand for Fresh Fruit Imports By Mnatsakanyan, Hovhannes; Lopez, Jose; Bakhtavoryan, Rafael
  49. Enhancement of the economic mechanism of regulation of the food market By Alimzhanova, Diliana
  50. IMPACT OF MILK PROCESSING PLANTS TO THEMILKPRODUCTION IN LIVESTOCK MARKET OF UZBEKISTAN By Abruev, Akmal
  51. Food Waste in Rural Households By Florkowski, Wojciech J.; Us, Anna; Klepacka, Anna M.
  52. Along the Giant’s Footprints: Bama China By Wang, H. Holly; Li, Yi'an
  53. Challenges for Land Use Functions in Central Asia By Hamidov, Ahmad
  54. World trade:agriculture vs. manufacturing By Volchkova, Natalya
  55. Trade liberalization and child mortality: a synthetic control method By Alessandro Olper; Daniele Curzi; Jo Swinnen
  56. An Optimal Combination of Proportional and Stop-Loss Reinsurance Contracts From Insurer's and Reinsurer's Viewpoints By Amir T. Payandeh-Najafabadi; Ali Panahi-Bazaz
  57. An Assessment of the Sectoral and Institutional Implementation of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan By Domingo, Sonny N.
  58. Working Paper 237 - Decomposing Sources of Productivity Change in Small-Scale Farming in Ethiopia By AfDB AfDB
  59. FARMERS’ WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR SOIL TESTING SERVICE IN NORTHERN HAITI By Senakpon, Kokoye
  60. WATER RESOURCES AND FOOD PRODUCTION IN AGRICULTURE By Tadjiev, Abdusame; Murtazaev, Olim
  61. Price Transmission on Wheat Flour Market in Georgia By Katsia, Ia; Mamardashvili, Phatima

  1. By: Renato Vargas; Pamela Escobar; Maynor Cabrera; Javier Cabrera; Violeta Hernández; Vivian Guzmán; Martin Cicowiez
    Abstract: In this study, we used a Computable General Equilibrium model of the Guatemalan economy to conduct simulations for a) a reduction in productivity due to climate change; and b) the effects of drought in agriculture. The reduction in productivity due to climate change would mean an important drop in the value added of agriculture and animal production, as well as a slight drop in industrial food production and the service industry. Under this scenario we should expect a fall in real GDP of 1.2%. The reduction of productivity could mean a reduced fiscal space, and a reduction in government expenditure because of lower tax revenues. More importantly, due to higher prices and lower income of households, this scenario could mean that consumption of agricultural goods for each type of household would be reduced in a relevant manner with great impacts on the food security aspect of access. One of the findings in the effects of drought in agriculture is a decrease of the value added of 23%. As expected, this situation would negatively affect the wages paid to unskilled workers, but also urban non-poor households would see a reduction of their disposable income due to higher food prices. One of the most interesting results is that the demand for land would fall by 38%. This is because as water would become scarcer, there would be fewer incentives to engage in agricultural activities. However, due to the importance of agricultural production for ensuring food security, these results show that a proper water allocation system is needed.
    Keywords: Regional Economics Measurement, Computable General Equilibrium, Spatial Analysis, Natural Resource, Agricultural Employment, Farm Household, Farm Input Markets
    JEL: R15 R22 Q12
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:lvl:mpiacr:2017-01&r=agr
  2. By: Ferrier, Peyton; Zhen, Chen; Bovay, John
    Abstract: The Produce Rules of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) marked the first instance of the FDA directly regulating food safety activities at the farm-level. Since most fruits and vegetables were covered, the law’s comprehensive ‘across-the-board’ implementation potentially created offsetting cross-price effects on the demand side since most producers would be bearing the implementation costs simultaneously. However, the fixed costs nature of some other regulations costs, the different distribution of farm sizes across commodities and the potential for some commodities to be exempted suggest that the effects would vary across commodities. We present an Equilibrium Displacement Model (EDM) to consider the effect of FSMA costs on prices and consumer and producer welfare. To parameterize the model, we use National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) data to calculate the cost of implementing FSMA rules for 18 fruits and 21 vegetables, IRI storescan data to estimate demand elasticities, Agricultural Marketing Service data to calculate data wholesale costs shares, and supply elasticities from extant sources While varying across commodities, the average cost of implementing FSMA is 2.79 percent of farm revenue for fruits and 1.52 percent of farm revenue for vegetables, that farm prices increase by 1.68 percent (fruit) and 0.44 percent (vegetables), and that consumer prices increase by 0.70 percent (fruit) and 0.12 percent (vegetables). If there is no corresponding demand effect or cost saving at the farm level associated with the implementation of these regulations, farm welfare, as a percentage of revenue, falls by 1.11 percent (fruit) and 0.96 percent (vegetables). Also, we found that weak substitution patterns between commodities at the retail level caused off-setting cross-price effects to be weak.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea16:252861&r=agr
  3. By: Briones, Roehlano M.
    Abstract: A well-known indicator of comparative advantage is domestic resource cost (DRC). This study provides updated estimates of DRC for major agricultural commodities in the Philippines toward evaluating competitiveness and comparative advantage as a policy guide. This study covers paddy rice, yellow maize, white maize, sugarcane, mango, coconut, milkfish, cardava banana, pineapple, hogs, and broilers. Results show that financial DRC ratio for all of the subject commodities are below unity, indicating that each activity is profitable from the private viewpoint. However, for some products, economic DRC ratio is much higher than financial DRC ratio; the distortion is mostly attributed to output price distortions. Economic DRC ratio is above unity, which means that the Philippines is not globally competitive in producing rice, hogs, and broilers. Sensitivity analysis is conducted for the main import-competing products, namely, rice, yellow maize, sugarcane, broilers, and hog; the sensitivity results confirm the robustness of the findings. The competitiveness analysis places the current policy framework into question. Comparative costs of rice, broilers, and hogs are currently at high levels. It is unrealistic to expect market and technology conditions to change drastically enough to make these products competitive (except perhaps for hogs). Given the large penalty of protection to consumers, and the fiscal burden of production support, it is appropriate to scale back on self-sufficiency targets for these uncompetitive products. For yellow maize and sugarcane, market conditions and technology have evolved to the point where these sectors are now globally competitive. Again, liberalization is highly appropriate, especially on the export side. There should also be greater emphasis on processing and logistics in order for the supply chain to maximize benefit from the farmers’ comparative advantage. Public goods for competitive crops, such as public research and development centers (which are historically underfunded or missing altogether), extension systems, and infrastructure, remain promising opportunities for government investment.
    Keywords: Philippines, agriculture, competitiveness, comparative advantage, domestic resource cost, DRC, agricultural commodities, paddy rice, yellow maize, white maize, sugarcane, mango, coconut, milkfish, cardava banana, pineapple, hogs, broilers
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phd:pjdevt:pjd_2014-2015_vol__41-42_nos__1-2g&r=agr
  4. By: Matthews, Alan; Salvatici, Luca; Scoppola, Margherita
    Abstract: This paper aims at providing an overview of the most relevant trade issues raised by the current agricultural domestic and trade policies of the European Union (EU) and at drawing policy implications for the future of the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) and for international trade negotiations. The focus of the paper is the period after the 2003 CAP reform which largely decoupled EU direct payments. The paper assesses the trade impacts of the EU policies by: a) analysing the evolution of the policy instruments and of the financial resources under Pillars 1 and 2 of the CAP; b) reviewing the theoretical literature and the empirical tools and evidence on the production and trade impacts of direct payments, market management measures and rural development policies; c) analysing the evolution of the bound, applied and preferential agricultural tariffs and of the tariff rate quotas applied by the EU; d) reviewing the theoretical literature and the empirical tools and evidence on the degree of agricultural protection provided to the EU agricultural sector by the EU multilateral and preferential tariffs, tariff rate quotas and non-tariff measures; and e) discussing the policy implications with a focus on the debate about the future of the CAP.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatrcp:252767&r=agr
  5. By: Samuel Marden (Department of Economics, University of Sussex)
    Abstract: A classic literature argues that improvements in agricultural productivity result in higher non-agricultural output, particularly at low levels of development. The proposed mechanisms for these ‘forward linkages’ centre on increases in the supply of factors—usually labour or capital—or demand externalities in product markets. Regardless of the mechanism, empirical evidence for substantial linkages from agriculture is limited. In this paper, I show that improvements in agricultural productivity were an important factor in the growth of the non-agricultural sector in early reform-era China. I obtain plausibly exogenous variation in agricultural productivity growth by exploiting the fact that reforms between 1978 and 1984 were more beneficial to farmers endowed with land suited to cash crops. Then, using a newly digitised panel of economic data for 561 counties, I trace the growth of agricultural and non-agricultural output over forty years. Over the 15 or 25 year periods following the reforms, I estimate elasticities of county level non-agricultural output with respect to agricultural output of 1.2 or 0.8. Several pieces of additional evidence indicate that the linkages identified were primarily due to higher agricultural surpluses increasing the supply of capital to local non-state firms.
    JEL: O11 O13 O43 P32
    Date: 2016–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sus:susewp:09116&r=agr
  6. By: Kostadinov, Anton
    Abstract: China’s striving to ensure food security for its large population, and that problem I well known. In about one fifth of global population is living in China, in the same time should relay only 1/15 from rural land and 8% of fresh water. China’s population grows not only as a numbers, but also it is urbanizing in a large scale, the disposable incomes are also growing. It all means that food consuming pattern in China is also changing, and food consumption in the country will grow in both dimension – as a quantity and as a quality. EU – China trade relations are complicated and protectionism could be seen in both sides. EU have large trade deficits with China. The most member states have also large deficits, but not Germany and Finland. EU member states have very different positions about trade relations with China. In the food sector EU experiences overproduction, closed markets in Russian Federation, and internal market tensions. Furthermore, EU has placed a strong emphasis on speeding up Free trade agreements with so dynamic Asian countries, including China, but there are no plausible results yet.
    Keywords: China,EU food trade,food security
    JEL: F15 F42
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:esconf:149572&r=agr
  7. By: Bollman, Ray (Rural Development Institute); Ferguson, Shon (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))
    Abstract: We estimate the impact of the removal of a railway transportation subsidy on the local economies of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, exploiting the large regional variation in these one-time freight rate increases. We find that higher freight rates – and hence lower farm gate prices – resulted in significantly lower farm revenues, farm asset values and farm numbers. Local employment in non-agricultural sectors systematically declined in areas that were hardest hit by the subsidy removal. The results suggest that the subsidy removal had detrimental spillover effects on local non-agricultural economy that are much larger than standard input-output models would predict.
    Keywords: Agricultural Trade Liberalization; Export Subsidy; Market Access; Spillovers
    JEL: F14 O13 Q16 Q17 Q18
    Date: 2016–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:1129&r=agr
  8. By: Olsson, Mats (Department of Economic History, Lund University); Svensson, Patrick (Department of Economic History, Lund University)
    Abstract: The Historical Database of Scanian Agriculture (HDSA) is a micro-level database over farm production in the most southern Swedish region of Scania (Skåne) based on flexible tithes. It contains over 85,000 farm level observations of both vegetable and animal production for the period 1702 to 1881. Moreover, this information is supplemented by information on the farmer, the farm, on enclosures, natural conditions, and distances from the farmstead to towns. The database is an open source and this paper provides information on the sources behind the data, the composition of the sample, and the way the database can be used to estimate production. The second part of the paper performs an overall analysis of the agricultural revolution in the area, showing the development over time of the vegetable and animal production, their respective significance, and an estimation of production per capita 1702 to 1865.
    Keywords: agriculture; production; database; micro level; Sweden; 18th Century; 19th century
    JEL: N53 Q12 Y10
    Date: 2017–01–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:luekhi:0151&r=agr
  9. By: Tasso Adamopoulos; Loren Brandt; Jessica Leight; Diego Restuccia
    Abstract: We use household-level panel data from China and a quantitative framework to document the extent and consequences of factor misallocation in agriculture. We find that there are substantial frictions in both the land and capital markets linked to land institutions in rural China that disproportionately constrain the more productive farmers. These frictions reduce aggregate agricultural productivity in China by affecting two key margins: (1) the allocation of resources across farmers (misallocation) and (2) the allocation of workers across sectors, in particular the type of farmers who operate in agriculture (selection). We show that selection can substantially amplify the static misallocation effect of distortionary policies by affecting occupational choices that worsen the distribution of productive units in agriculture.
    JEL: O11 O14 O4
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23039&r=agr
  10. By: Thiemo Fetzer (Department of Economics, University of Warwick); Samuel Marden (Department of Economics, University of Sussex)
    Abstract: Weak property rights are strongly associated with underdevelopment, low state capacity and civil conflict. In economic models of conflict, outbreaks of violence require two things: the prize must be both valuable and contestable. This paper exploits spatial and temporal variation in contestability of land title to explore the relation between (in)secure property rights and conflict in the Brazilian Amazon. Our estimates suggest that, at the local level, assignment of secure property rights eliminates substantively all land related conflict, even without changes in enforcement. Changes in land use are also consistent with reductions in land related conflict.
    Keywords: property rights, land titling, conflict, deforestation
    JEL: O12 Q15 D74 Q23
    Date: 2016–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sus:susewp:09216&r=agr
  11. By: Murat Iyigun; Nathan Nunn; Nancy Qian
    Abstract: We investigate the long-run effects of cooling on conflict. We construct a geo-referenced and digitized database of conflicts in Europe, North Africa, and the Near East from 1400-1900, which we merge with historical temperature data. We show that cooling is associated with increased conflict. When we allow the effects of cooling over a fifty-year period to depend on the extent of cooling during the preceding period, the effect of cooling on conflict is larger in locations that experienced earlier cooling. We interpret this as evidence that the adverse effects of climate change intensify with its duration.
    JEL: N43 N53 O13 P16 Q34
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23033&r=agr
  12. By: Cash, Sean B.; McAlister, Anna R.
    Abstract: We seek to examine how “adult-facing” food price interventions (such as junk food taxes) and warning labels may influence kids who are buying their own snacks. This work, conducted through a series of both laboratory and field experiments, also looks at the cognitive correlates of children’s market behavior. A proper understanding of the development and functioning of children as autonomous consumers has important implications for the role of labelling policies for good nutritional choices on children and the economy.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:assa17:252700&r=agr
  13. By: Aditi Bhattacharyya (Department of Economics and International Business, Sam Houston State University); Daisy Das (Cotton College State University, Guwahati, Assam, India); Arkadipta Ghosh (Mathematica Policy Research Inc)
    Abstract: We examine the impact of electrification on the welfare of poor households in rural India. We use two rounds of survey data (2004-2005 and 2011-2012) from the National Sample Survey Organization, and examine household welfare as captured by monthly and annual expenditures on multiple categories of goods and services among the poorest households. Using inverse propensity score weighting and difference-in-differences estimation in two separate analyses for households across all states and in eight backward states, we find significant evidence for improved welfare from electrification. This includes higher monthly expenditures in total as well as on food, fuel, entertainment, nonfood, education, and durable goods across all states. We also find evidence for higher expenditures in selected categories of goods like fuel, entertainment, nonfood, and education items after electrification in backward states. Additionally, we find that the poorest rural households in backward states experienced reduced medical expenditures after electrification.
    Keywords: Rural electrification, household welfare, poor households
    JEL: O13 I30
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:shs:wpaper:1702&r=agr
  14. By: Mendis, Sachintha; Hovhannisyan, Vardges
    Abstract: Food consumers in China have undergone significant changes in their food consumption patterns and have become more dependent on animal products for protein, while substituting fine grains for coarse grains. Considerable research effort has been devoted to this topic. A majority of these studies rely on the AIDS model, which has linear Engel and ignores unobserved consumer heterogeneity. We study food demand in China using the Exact Affine Stone Index (EASI) system. The EASI model not only shares all of the desirable properties of the AIDS model but also provides additional benefits. Specifically, it is not subject to the rank three limitation of Gorman (1981) and allows the Engel curves to take arbitrary shapes. Further, the EASI accounts for unobserved consumer heterogeneity. This is especially important in welfare studies conducted on consumer-level since much of the demand variation is left unexplained. Previous studies focus on changes in quantities, however we reveal that quality is also very important. Further, results confirm the prevalence of unobserved heterogeneity in consumer food preferences across provinces in China. By enhancing the findings of previous studies, this study elicits more realistic food preferences in China for agricultural policy, trade, and foreign direct investment decisions.
    Keywords: Demand for food quality, EASI demand model, food demand in China, Demand and Price Analysis, D11, D12,
    Date: 2017–01–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252797&r=agr
  15. By: Taylor, Mykel; Wilson, Candice
    Abstract: ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 2014 Farm Bill required Kansas wheat producers to make a series of enrollment decisions that were both complicated and based on incomplete information. With this bill, producers were required to complete a one-time enrollment in one of three programs (ARC-CO, PLC, or ARC-IC) to serve as a safety net for poor crop prices and/or yields over the subsequent five-year life of the legislation. Analyzing the effects of incomplete information on producers’ decisions provides an opportunity to identify challenges associated with program selection under the 2014 Farm Bill and suggest changes for future farm support legislation. METHODS: Kansas county-level enrollment data for wheat base acres obtained from USDA-FSA are used to model aggregate producer sign-up decisions as a function of estimated 2014 payments, county-level yield variability, prior farm program enrollment, and extension programming efforts at the county and state level. This OLS model is subsequently replicated using individual producer data from surveys conducted during fifteen extension meetings held across Kansas. The model based on individual data is a regression of stated preferences for the three programs as a function of farm size, farmer demographics, risk preferences, and knowledge of the Farm Bill. RESULTS: Comparisons of model results from the aggregated enrollment data and the individual survey data offer greater insights into the factors affecting producer decisions. Specifically, aggregate enrollment decisions are primarily explained by expected payments for the first year of the program. For counties with a positive expected payment for 2014 under the ARC-CO program, enrollment in that program was higher. However, when the regression is repeated using individual data, other factors affect the enrollment decision such as the number of years a producer has been farming, the size of the farm, their membership in commodity associations, and their preferences for risk protection. CONCLUSIONS: The 2014 Farm Bill required producers to select participation in a single support program for the five-year life of the legislation. This decision had to be made without knowing exactly how crop prices and yields would behave in the future. It is important to understand how producers made their decisions based on incomplete information to inform future legislative efforts for an effective farm safety net. This research expands that understanding by analyzing both aggregate and individual data to determine the factors that influence program choice.
    Keywords: Farm policy, Farm bill, commodity programs, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252805&r=agr
  16. By: Rylko, Dmitri
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249909&r=agr
  17. By: Baker, Brian; Russell, June
    Abstract: Submitted for the Invited Case Study session of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association 2016 Annual Meeting Boston, MA
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea16:252706&r=agr
  18. By: Brink, Lars; Orden, David
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics,
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:253002&r=agr
  19. By: Kaiyatsa, Stevier
    Abstract: A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF REQUIREMENTS FOR AWARD OF THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS, LILONGWE UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES, BUNDA CAMPUS. Major Advisor: Dr. Charles B.L. Jumbe
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:thesms:252977&r=agr
  20. By: Rupayan Pal; Prasenjit Banerjee; Ada Wossink
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:man:sespap:1701&r=agr
  21. By: Robert A. Moffitt (Department of Economics, Johns Hopkins University); David C. Ribar (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne; ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course; and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA))
    Abstract: A long literature in economics concerns itself with differential allocations of resources to different children within the family unit. In a study of approximately 1,500 very disadvantaged families with children in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio from 1999 to 2005, significant differences in levels of food allocation, as measured by an indicator of food “insecurity,†are found across children of different ages and genders. Using answers to unique survey questions for a specific child in the family, food insecurity levels are found to be much higher among older boys and girls than among younger ones, and to be sometimes higher among older boys than among older girls. Differential allocations are strongly correlated with the dietary and nutritional needs of the child. However, the differences in allocation appear only in the poorest families with the lowest levels of money income and family resources in general, and most differences disappear in significance or are greatly reduced in magnitude when resources rise to only modest levels. Differences in food insecurity across different types of children therefore appear to be a problem primarily only among the worst-off families.
    Keywords: Food insecurity, children, gender, intrafamily allocation, Three-City Study
    JEL: D13 I1 I3 J1
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2017n04&r=agr
  22. By: Dries, Liesbeth
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–11–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250099&r=agr
  23. By: Shahnoushi, Naser; Sayed, Saghaian; Hezareh, Reza; Tirgari Seraji, Mohammad
    Abstract: Although food prices are at or near a historical low in major world markets, there is increasing concern about food security. The high food prices experienced over recent years have led to the widespread view that food price volatility has increased. In this study, factors affecting food prices are investigated for subgroups of foods such as cereals, meats, beverages, and vegetable oils, using Seemingly Unrelated Regression panel data approach with monthly world food prices from January 1994 to July 2016. Estimation results show crude oil and gasoline prices have a positive significant impact on food price subgroups such as cereals and meats. With the rise in Di-Ammonium Phosphate and Triple Superphosphate prices, the cereals, beverages, and vegetable oil prices increased. Potassium chloride fertilizer price has a positive significant effect on cereals, but in most cases, the meats and beverages’ subgroups were not affected by fertilizer prices. Also, the exchange rate had a negative significant effect on all food price subgroups.
    Keywords: Food Prices, Panel SUR, Food Security, Exchange Rates., Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2017–01–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252782&r=agr
  24. By: Pierre Strosser (ACTeon); Gloria De Paoli (ACTeon); Tatiana Efimova (OECD)
    Abstract: This study was one of the first attempts to evaluate and quantify the benefits of transboundary co-operation between Georgia and Azerbaijan. A specific framework for inventorying these benefits, taking into account all the different dimensions of transboundary water management, was built and applied to the major transboundary water bodies. Though a thorough assessment of the costs and benefits of transboundary co-operation in the two selected cases was not possible due to the lack of some quantitative and economic data, the assessment results highlighted the importance of promoting the integration of economic thinking in transboundary water management. The present and future prospects for transboundary co-operation on water management are still very positive: the two countries are working on a Transboundary Agreement, which will provide the necessary regulatory framework for co-operation and, most importantly, will set up a Joint Commission on Sustainable Use and Protection of the Kura River Basin. The outcomes of this study allowed for the identification of priorities for future work on transboundary co-operation between Georgia and Azerbaijan, and namely, support to developing guidelines on mechanisms to update databases, but also on new tools and systems.
    Keywords: benefits of water cooperation, economic instruments, river basin, trans-boundary water management, water policy
    JEL: D78 Q15 Q25 Q28
    Date: 2017–01–24
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:oec:envaaa:114-en&r=agr
  25. By: Stratan, Alexandru
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249972&r=agr
  26. By: Sant'Anna, Ana Claudia; Bergtold, Jason; Featherstone, Allen; Caldas, Marcellus; Granco, Gabriel
    Abstract: Brazil is one of the world’s leading ethanol, sugar and sugarcane producer. Sugarcane is produced by farmers (40%) and ethanol plants (60%). Sugarcane production is limited to a certain radius of the mill to minimize transportation costs and avoid sugarcane quality losses. The distance and harvest timeline limitations aligned with the desire to guarantee sugarcane supply or to create barrier of entry to competing firms make vertical integration, a common practice for mills in Brazil. This study estimates the impact of upstream vertical integration on output-oriented technical efficiency using an output-oriented DEA analysis and a tobit censured model. Inputs considered in the model are the amount of crushed sugarcane and the land used, while the quantities of ethanol and sugar produced are the outputs. The sample consists of 154 mills located in the Center-South area of Brazil. The tobit censured model controlled for the percentage of crushed sugarcane produced on lands owned or rented by mills, the type of mill (i.e. mixed mill or one that produces only sugar or only ethanol), if the mill was in the of Sao Paulo, if it was in the Center-West region and its daily sugarcane crushing capacity. An increase in the percentage of the vertical integration decreases output-oriented technical efficiency by 0.0001 at a 10% level of statistical significance. The continued existence of vertical integration, aligned with the results from this study, implies that mills are adopting this strategy for reasons other than gains in efficiency. Mills may be willing to forgo marginal gains in efficiency, from procuring sugarcane from independent producers, to avoid transaction costs. The Brazilian government may be able to reduce vertical integration by subsidizing sugarcane producers, applying contract enforcement measures and, providing farmers with adequate infrastructure (e.g. paved roads). These measures could increase the number of sugarcane suppliers and eliminate barriers to entry created by mills.
    Keywords: Sugarcane expansion, two-stage data envelopment analysis, transaction costs, Agribusiness, Industrial Organization, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252777&r=agr
  27. By: Hongqin Chang; Jing Liu; Yanyun Gao
    Abstract: Using the data from three waves (1995, 2002 and 2008) of the Chinese Household Income Project (CHIP), which covers nine provinces in China, this paper investigates the impact of land tenure security on farmers’ labor market outcomes in rural China, especially for women’ s labor market behavior. To identify the effect of land tenure security, this paper used difference-in-differences strategy to control for time invariant heterogeneity, and a number of observed time-varying economic characteristics for its validity. The paper finds that in response to more security land rights, both women and men increase their probability of wage employment participation and individual income.
    Keywords: Land Tenure, off-farm, rural China
    JEL: O15 J61 Q15 R23
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:lvl:pmmacr:2017-03&r=agr
  28. By: Tomas Balint (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - Paris 1 (UP1)); Francesco Lamperti (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - Paris 1 (UP1)); Mauro Napoletano (Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques); Antoine Mandel (Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics); Andrea Roventini (Laboratory of Economics and Management (Pisa) (LEM)); Sandro Sapio (Università degli Studi di Napoli Parthenope)
    Abstract: We provide a survey of the micro and macro economics of climate change from a complexity science perspective and we discuss the challenges ahead for this line of research. We identify four areas of the literature where complex system models have already produced valuable insights: (i) coalition formation and climate negotiations, (ii) macroeconomic impacts of climate-related events, (iii) energy markets and (iv) diffusion of climate-friendly technologies. On each of these issues, accounting for heterogeneity, interactions and disequilibrium dynamics provides a complementary and novel perspective to the one of standard equilibrium models. Furthermore, it highlights the potential economic benefits of mitigation and adaptation policies and the risk of under-estimating systemic climate change-related risks.
    Keywords: Climate change; Climate policy; Climate economics; Complex systems; Agent-based models; Socio-economics networks
    JEL: C63 Q40 Q50 Q54
    Date: 2016–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/5qr7f0k4sk8rbq4do5u6v70rm0&r=agr
  29. By: Pilvere, Irina; Nipers, Aleksejs
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249951&r=agr
  30. By: Jonas Kathage (European Commission - JRC); Manuel Gómez-Barbero (European Commission - JRC); Emilio Rodríguez-Cerezo (European Commission - JRC)
    Abstract: Bt maize is the only genetically modified (GM) crop grown in the EU for commercial purposes and so far adopted mainly in Spain. Its cultivation can have a number of socio-economic consequences for farmers, upstream and downstream industries, as well as consumers. The European GMO Socio-Economics Bureau (ESEB) has compiled topics, indicators, methodological guidelines and potential data sources to carry out analyses of these socio-economic effects. This document provides a framework applicable to EU Member States currently growing Bt maize and those potentially cultivating it in the future. Over 30 topics and 100 indicators, which range from farm adoption rates to consumer surplus, have been identified by the ESEB Technical Working Group, which is composed of representatives of Member States and assisted by the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre. Evidence of impacts in the EU already exists for some topics both ex post and ex ante, but for most topics it is very limited. Methodologies have been developed by the scientific community for many of the topics and indicators, from simple partial budget analysis to complex aggregated models. It is concluded that while methodologies are available for many of the topics and indicators, the main constraint is a lack of data.
    Keywords: European Union, farm survey, genetically modified crops, genetic engineering, impact assessment, socio-economic analysis, welfare analysis
    JEL: Q11 Q12 Q13 Q15
    Date: 2016–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc103197&r=agr
  31. By: Kakulia, Nino; Kochlamazashvili, Irakli; Mamardashvili, Mamardashvili
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249974&r=agr
  32. By: McFadden, Brandon; Mullally, Conner
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis,
    Date: 2017–01–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252778&r=agr
  33. By: Lakoh, Kepifri; Perrin, Richard K.; Fulginiti, Lilyan
    Abstract: This research analyzes the market and welfare effects of foreign biofuel investments into Sierra Leone. A log-linear comparative static displacement model is used to carry out the analysis. A 30% demand shock was introduced into the equilibrium system to represent an increase in biofuel demand as a result of increased foreign biofuel investments. Results revealed large welfare enhancing gains for consumers of inedible biofuels but resulted in welfare losses in the staples and edible biofuel consumer markets. Producers (farmers) generally reported welfare gains by virtue of owning factor inputs (land and other). Equilibrium quantities of inedible biofuels, edible biofuels and food increased by about 8.8%, decreased by 0.22% and increased by 0.6% respectively. Prices for both inputs and outputs increased while quantities of inputs also increased.
    Keywords: Biofuels, Comparative Static, General Equilibrium, Log-linear, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, International Development, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2016–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaae16:252534&r=agr
  34. By: Brink, Lars
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250095&r=agr
  35. By: Berning, Joshua; Campbell, Ben
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2017–01–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252733&r=agr
  36. By: Katare, Bhagyashree; Serebrennikov, Dmytro; Wang, H. Holly; Wetzstein, Michael
    Abstract: In 2010, 21% of the total U.S. food available for consumption was wasted at the household level. In response to this waste, a number of counties and U.S. localities have instituted policies (disposal taxes) directed toward reducing this waste. However, currently, there is no federal food-waste disposal tax. The aim of this paper is to establish a theoretical foundation for household food waste, and based on this theory, determine an optimal food-waste (disposal) tax along with government incentives. The theory unravels the interrelation between social food insecurity and external environmental costs, not generally considered by households when they waste food. An optimal disposal tax and government incentives involve Pigovian mechanisms and government benefits. For a zero level of food waste, the optimal disposal taxes and government incentives approach infinity.
    Keywords: Externalities, Food insecurity, Food waste, Social welfare, Sustainability, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, D11, D62, H21, H23, I18, I31, Q51,
    Date: 2016–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea16:252703&r=agr
  37. By: Djanibekov, Nodir; Amirova, Iroda; Burkitbayeva, Saule
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2016–11–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249977&r=agr
  38. By: Natalia Ferreira-Coímbra (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República); Juan Labraga (Universidad ORT Uruguay)
    Abstract: This article uses a gravity model estimated by Poisson PML to quantify the trade impact of certain sanitary and phytosanitary standards applied to bovine meat and agricultural products. In the case of bovine meat, we study the impact of the Foot-and-Mouse-Disease status (FMD), the status of Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and the European Union´s decision to ban meat produced with animals treated with growth promotants over Mercosur´s exports. We found a negative and significant association between FMD and exports. In addition and counterintuitively, given that MERCOSUR´s countries have never produced meat with animals treated with growth promotants, we found a negative and significant impact of this new standard. However, when the impact is measured only for the boneless meat, proxy of high-quality meat, we found a positive impact. The second case deals with the impact on exports of the measures taken by the European Union referred to agricultural genetically modified products (GMO), in particular the impact on Argentine , Brazilian and Mexican exports of corn , cotton and canola . We found that the Community measures on cotton and canola have a negative association with exports, while those taken on maize have a positive association with the exports. In the case of national measures, we find a negative association with the exports of Argentina and a positive association with Brazil´s exports.
    Keywords: gravity model, Poisson regression, agri-food trade
    JEL: F14 Q17 C23
    Date: 2015–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ude:wpaper:1215&r=agr
  39. By: Sedik, David; Ulbricht, Carl; Dzhamankulov, Nuritdin
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249910&r=agr
  40. By: Kvartiuk, Vasyl
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249958&r=agr
  41. By: AfDB AfDB
    Date: 2016–05–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:adb:adbwps:2330&r=agr
  42. By: Meloyan, Artak; Bakhtavoryan, Rafael
    Abstract: No other form of promotional tools can substitute coupons in promotional campaigns. Due to their unique dual impact (price discount and informational stimulant) on consumption, coupons are widely used by different manufacturers and stores. However, to the best of our knowledge, no prior research has been done regarding the analysis of the impact of coupons on market shares of national brand and private label food products. To fill this void, the goal of this study was to examine the relationship between coupons and market shares in the context of national brand and private label food products by estimating the Almost Ideal Demand System model and using the Nielsen Homescan panel data on household purchases of ready-to-eat cereal, yogurt, and spaghetti sauce from January of 2012 through December of 2014. Estimation results revealed a significant relationship between coupon values and market shares of the food product brands considered. However, the effects of coupon values on the market shares were varied for national brands and private labels. In particular, with the exception of other brands of yogurt, for national brands, market share elasticities with respect to coupon values were positive, suggesting that market share of national brands increased with an increase in coupon values. For private label of cereal and spaghetti sauce, market share elasticities with respect to coupon values were negative, indicating that an increase in coupon values led to a decline in their market shares.
    Keywords: coupons, market shares, brands, demand system, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, D12,
    Date: 2017–01–16
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252683&r=agr
  43. By: Georg Helbing; Zhiwei Shen; Martin Odening; Matthias Ritter
    Abstract: “Bodenrichtwerte” reflect the average location value of land plots within a specific area. They constitute an important source of information that contributes to price transparency on land markets. In Germany, “Bodenrichtwerte” are provided by publicly appointed expert groups (Gutachterausschüsse). Using empirical data from Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania between 2013 and 2015, this article examines the relation between “Bodenrichtwerten” and statistically determined location values. It turns out that “Bodenrichtwerte” tend to underestimate location values of arable land by 11.5 percent on average. This underestimation can be traced back to the pronounced increase of land prices in the observation period. As an alternative to the expert-based determination of location values, we suggest a nonparametric smoothing procedure that rests on the Propagation-Separation Approach. The application of this data-driven procedure achieves an accuracy comparable to that of official “Bodenrichtwerte” at the one-year ahead prediction of location values without the requirement of expert knowledge.
    Keywords: land value; adaptive weight smoothing; agricultural land markets; propagation-separation approach; PSA
    JEL: C14 Q15 R39
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hum:wpaper:sfb649dp2017-002&r=agr
  44. By: Avery S. Cohn; Juliana Gil; Thomas Berger; Heitor Pellegrina; Chantal Toledo
    Abstract: This paper studies patterns and processes of pasture to crop conversion in Mato Grosso state, Brazil, using satellite imagery, statistical analysis, focus groups and expert interviews.
    Keywords: Land use change, Agricultural intensification, Mixed methods, Land sparing, Amazon, Cerrado
    JEL: F Z
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:mpr:mprres:8ce99775615f42b98ff43f530631ef5d&r=agr
  45. By: Kenichi Kawasaki (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)
    Abstract: Recently a number of large-scale uncertainties have emerged as threats to the development of regional integration. Most notably, the UK has decided to leave the EU, and the new US president has stated that he would withdraw the US from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). This paper presents a quantitative comparison of the economic impacts of a number of alternative regional trade agreement (RTA) scenarios. The impacts were estimated using a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model of global trade. It is estimated that the US would no longer gain and might even lose, if it withdraws from TPP. The benefits of the bilateral Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with Japan would be smaller than those of TPP. Higher tariffs on US imports from China and Mexico would lead to significant deterioration of the economic welfare of not only China and Mexico but also the US. Furthermore, China fs benefits from the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) might be relatively limited depending on the levels of the agreement and weighed against the adverse impacts of the possible US tariffs. The UK economy would suffer as a result of BREXIT, but the cost of BREXIT could be smaller than the possible benefits of joining TPP. All in all, it has been shown that income gains resulting from non-tariff measure (NTM) reductions are much larger than those arising from tariff removals. Global best efforts are required to achieve higher level RTAs and the resulting larger economic benefits.
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ngi:dpaper:16-28&r=agr
  46. By: Kim, Kyung-Ryang
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: International Development, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession,
    Date: 2016–11–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250057&r=agr
  47. By: Piatnytskyi, Valeriy
    Keywords: International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249908&r=agr
  48. By: Mnatsakanyan, Hovhannes; Lopez, Jose; Bakhtavoryan, Rafael
    Abstract: Over the last three decades, U.S. imports of fresh fruits have been constantly increasing at an annual average growth rate of 7% (USITC, 2016). Fresh fruits make up 9% of the total U.S. food imports (UN Database, 2016) with the top seven fruits accounting for 82% of the value of the U.S. fresh fruit imports and Canada and Mexico (NAFTA countries) as the most important trade partners (USITC, 2016). This study analyzes the main U.S. markets and supply sources of the top imported fresh fruits and estimates a Source-Differentiated Almost Ideal Demand System model (SDAIDS) using time-series data, with North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) countries and the rest of the world (ROW) as import sources. Our results suggest that source of origin is an intrinsic quality attribute for most of the fresh fruits analyzed. More specifically, the study found that most uncompensated own-price elasticities are inelastic, most cross-price elasticities are positives indicating that the fruits imported from given sources are net substitutes, and that statistically significant expenditure elasticities are positive implying that the quantity imported of all the fresh fruit analyzed increases as real expenditure for those fruits rises. The results of this study will be useful to policy-makers in regulating the international market of fresh fruits, setting optimal import taxes and price floors, and predicting likely scenarios of imports from Canada and Mexico.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis,
    Date: 2017–01–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252760&r=agr
  49. By: Alimzhanova, Diliana
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249949&r=agr
  50. By: Abruev, Akmal
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2016–11–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250063&r=agr
  51. By: Florkowski, Wojciech J.; Us, Anna; Klepacka, Anna M.
    Abstract: The paper examines food waste volume generated by a sample of rural households accounting for four different categories of food waste. Food waste does occur and some of it is unavoidable leading to the question how to manage it. This study identifies factors responsible for the volume of food waste by category, but also identifies factors influencing the decision to collect food waste in household for the purpose of local biogas production. Tobit technique is applied to identify factors, demographic and socio-economic characteristics of consumers and their households that influence the percentage of wasted food by type. A separate decision equation identifies supporting or limiting factors influencing the decision to sort food waste for biogas production. Education, gender, age, household size, and employment status have been identified as relevant characteristics determining the volume of wasted food and the decision to support using food waste for biogas generation.
    Keywords: Survey, food waste, rural household, Poland, biogas, Tobit, Consumer/Household Economics, Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q10, Q16, Q42,
    Date: 2017–01–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252812&r=agr
  52. By: Wang, H. Holly; Li, Yi'an
    Abstract: When McDonald’s entered Chinese market in 1989, Bama Company, a key supplier of McDonald’s deserts, followed to explore this potential high-volume bakery goods kingdom in Asia. Having been influenced by western culture since the economic reform in the 1980s, Chinese people, especially the young generation, love to enrich their daily diet with western food. Along with American fast food booming in China, bakery products, such as cakes, cookies, and other deserts are also well accepted by consumers. This case introduces how Bama grows its international market by following its giant client. While maintaining its long term partnership with McDonald’s, Bama also develops other clients in the fast food chain in this unfamiliar yet exciting world. Bama China further seeks more expansion and explores larger growth in the Asian-Pacific region to develop bakery markets. This case study discusses several options for the future of Bama China.
    Keywords: Chinese bakery industry, B2B, fast food, dessert, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development,
    Date: 2016–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea16:252707&r=agr
  53. By: Hamidov, Ahmad
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249973&r=agr
  54. By: Volchkova, Natalya
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250097&r=agr
  55. By: Alessandro Olper; Daniele Curzi; Jo Swinnen
    Abstract: We study the causal effect of trade liberalization on child mortality by exploiting 41 policy reform experiments in the 1960-2010 period. The Synthetic Control Method for comparative case studies allows to compare at the country level the trajectory of post-reform health outcomes of treated countries (those which experienced trade liberalization) with the trajectory of a combination of similar but untreated countries. In contrast with previous findings, we find that the effect of trade liberalization on health outcomes displays a huge heterogeneity, both in the direction and the magnitude of the estimated effect. Among the 41 investigated cases, 19 displayed a significant reduction in child mortality after trade liberalization. In 19 cases there was no significant effect, while in three cases we found a significant worsening in child mortality after trade liberalization. Trade reforms in democracies, in middle income countries and which reduced taxation in agriculture reduce child mortality more.
    Keywords: Trade liberalization, Child Mortality, Synthetic Control Method
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ete:ceswps:567787&r=agr
  56. By: Amir T. Payandeh-Najafabadi; Ali Panahi-Bazaz
    Abstract: A reinsurance contract should address the conflicting interests of the insurer and reinsurer. Most of existing optimal reinsurance contracts only considers the interests of one party. This article combines the proportional and stop-loss reinsurance contracts and introduces a new reinsurance contract called proportional-stop-loss reinsurance. Using the balanced loss function, unknown parameters of the proportional-stop-loss reinsurance have been estimated such that the expected surplus for both the insurer and reinsurer are maximized. Several characteristics for the new reinsurance are provided.
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:1701.05450&r=agr
  57. By: Domingo, Sonny N.
    Abstract: This study examines the grounding and sectoral translation of the National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Plan (NDRRMP), focusing on the thematic areas of disaster prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Republic Act 10121, also known as the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010, provided for the crafting and implementation of the NDRRMP, outlining the activities aimed at managing risks and strengthening institutional arrangements and capacity at the national and subnational levels. The NDRRMP supposedly outlines the way toward mainstreaming of DRRM and climate change adaptation in policy formulation, development planning, budgeting, and governance with its four priority pillars. Notwithstanding evident weaknesses in grounding and institutional translation, policy support and departmental creativity exhibited by the theme leaders attest to the competence of local executive servants. It was evident that disaster risk management, as espoused, had influenced development processes and institutional initiatives within five years from the NDRRMP’s launching. Ultimately, strengthening of RA 10121 through appropriate translation and more apt institutional arrangements will ensure the realization of the full potential of the law.
    Keywords: Philippines, disaster risk reduction and management, climate change adaptation, National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan (NDRRMP), disaster risk management policy, Republic Act 10121, Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2016-49&r=agr
  58. By: AfDB AfDB
    Date: 2016–06–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:adb:adbwps:2332&r=agr
  59. By: Senakpon, Kokoye
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2017–01–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252804&r=agr
  60. By: Tadjiev, Abdusame; Murtazaev, Olim
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–11–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249993&r=agr
  61. By: Katsia, Ia; Mamardashvili, Phatima
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis,
    Date: 2016–11–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249990&r=agr

This nep-agr issue is ©2017 by Angelo Zago. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
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