nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2017‒01‒22
39 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Conjunctive On- and Off-farm Surface Water Investment influence on Crop Mix and Groundwater Use on an Agricultural Landscape By Kovacs, Kent; Durand-Morat, Alvaro
  2. The impact of agricultural activities on urbanization: Evidence and implications for India By Tripathi, Sabyasachi; Rani, Chetana
  3. Agricultural prices during drought in Ethiopia: An updated assessment using national producer data (January 2014 to June 2016) By Bachewe, Fantu Nisrane; Yimer, Feiruz; Minten, Bart
  4. Food (In)security and the Price of Rice Self-Sufficiency By Briones, Roehlano M.
  5. Agricultural Insurance Program: Lessons from Different Country Experiences By Reyes, Celia M.; Mina, Christian D.; Agbon, Adrian D.; Gloria, Reneli Ann B.
  6. Trade Liberalization and Endogenous Quality Choice in Food and Agricultural Trade By Eum, Jihyun; Sheldon, Ian
  7. Opportunities for Strengthening Agriculture Insurance Programs: Philippine Crop Insurance Corporation and LGU Partnerships By Reyes, Celia M.; Mina, Christian D.; Agbon, Adrian D.; Gloria, Reneli Ann B.
  8. Agricultural Production, Welfare and Food Security under Climate Change in Tajikistan By Aliev, Jovidon
  9. Estimation of Vulnerability to Poverty Using a Multilevel Longitudinal Model: Evidence from the Philippines By Mina, Christian D.; Imai, Katsushi S.
  10. Winter is Coming: The Long-Run Effects of Climate Change on Conflict, 1400-1900 By Iyigun, Murat; Nunn, Nathan; Qian, Nancy
  11. An analysis on the Italian agricultural firms: effects of public subsidies By V. Santoni; M. Pulina
  12. Disentangling Innovation in Small Food Firms: The role of External Knowledge, Support, and Collaboration By Wixe, Sofia; Nilsson, Pia; Naldi, Lucia; Westlund, Hans
  13. Risk Effects on Nitrogen Fertilization and Cost-Share Payments under Alternative Tillage and Cover Crop Systems for Cotton By Boyer, Christopher; Harmon, Xavier; Lambert, Dayton; Larson, James; Donald, Tyler
  14. New Science of Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture Implies Higher Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) By Nelson, Gerald C.
  15. Water use efficiency of agroforestry systensin irrigated agriculture By Thevs, Niels; Strenge, Eva; Aliev, Kumar; Baibagysov, Azim; Eraaliev, Maksat; Lang, Petra; Thomas, Frank
  16. Agricultural Policy Post-Brexit: UK and EU Perspectives By Matthews, Alan
  17. European Coexistence Bureau (ECoB) - Best Practice Document for coexistence of genetically modified cotton with conventional and organic farming By Ivelin Iliev Rizov
  18. Evaluation of the Registry Service for Basic Sectors in Agriculture By Reyes, Celia M.; Gloria, Reneli Ann B.
  19. U.S. WTO Complaint on China’s Domestic Support – Wheat, Corn and Rice: Preliminary Observations By Brink, Lars; Orden, David
  20. The Trans-Pacific Partnership and Japan’s Agricultural Trade By Zhu, Manhong
  21. Alleviating Tajikistan’s vulnerability to climate change: An agricultural policy approach By Lerman, Zvi
  22. The Impact of NuVal Shelf Nutrition Labels on Consumption: Evidence from Cold Cereal Purchases By Melo, Grace
  23. Market Analysis in the Agri-food Sector By Grings, Michael
  24. Agricultural Policy and Trade in Central Asia and the South Caucasus in the Context of WTO Rules By Brink, Lars
  25. Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture: Understanding Global Effects on Yield and Welfare By Moore, Frances C.
  26. Trade and Agricultural Disease: Import Restrictions in the Wake of the India – Agricultural Products Dispute By Kamal Saggi; Mark Wu
  27. Quality Labels and Export Performance: Evidence from the French Cheese Industry By Duvaleix-Treguer, Sabine; Emlinger, Charlotte; Gaigne, Carl; Latouche, Karine
  28. Biofuel Substitution and Carbon Dioxide Emission: Implication for Biofuel Mandate By Suh, Dong Hee
  29. Fuel to Food: Evidence of Price Pass-through in Kyrgyzstan By Ilysov, Jarilkasin
  30. Economic contraction and food insecurity in the post-Soviet region By Sedik, David
  31. Potential Economic Effects of the Reduction in Agricultural and Nonagricultural Trade Barriers in the Transatlantic and Investment Partnership By Cororaton, Caesar B.; Orden, David
  32. Rural youth and employment in Ethiopia By Schmidt, Emily; Bekele, Firew
  33. Beef Market Integration and Price Transmission in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Countries By Yoon, Jongyeol; Brown, Scott
  34. LANDLOCKEDNESS –INTERNATIONAL TRADE –FOOD SECURITY:Do landlocked countries suffer from food insecurity? By Zafari, Khurshid; Ismailov, Azamat
  35. Environmental Protection and Economic Growth: An Optimal Pollution Controlling Model By Liu, Liyuan; Peng, Fei
  36. The Organization of Contracting and Quality Control in Dairy Supply Chains in Kyrgyzstan By Saak, Alexander
  37. Climate Change and the U.S. Livestock Market By Darbandi, Elham
  38. Russian import restrictions and their effects on the agricultural sectors of the CCA countries By Bulatov, Dmitry
  39. The local effects of an innovation: Evidence from the French fish market By Gobillon, Laurent; Wolff, François-Charles

  1. By: Kovacs, Kent; Durand-Morat, Alvaro
    Abstract: The use of surface water to replace groundwater for irrigation is often viewed as an effective approach for reducing groundwater overdraft on an agricultural landscape. The expected increase in the aquifer volume in the presence of surface water does not occur unless the off-farm water price is low enough to generate a significant shift away from groundwater. There is a change in the crop pattern toward more irrigation intensive crops, and the net effect can be a rise in groundwater extraction.
    Keywords: Irrigation, Groundwater conservation, Surface water delivery, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q15, Q24, Q25,
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:251960&r=agr
  2. By: Tripathi, Sabyasachi; Rani, Chetana
    Abstract: As a part of the development process, India is currently going through a transformation from agriculture based economy to industry and service lead urbanized economy. However, no formal quantitative research has been done on this phenomenon. In this perspective, based on Matsuyama’s (1992) theoretical framework and using panel data model, the impact of agricultural activities on urbanization in India is analyzed in this paper. For the analysis 15 major agricultural states of India are considered for the period of 1981 to 2015 by sourcing data from mainly Census of India and Ministry of agriculture, government of India. The empirical estimations reveal that the higher share of agriculture in GDP, amount of cultivated land area, and rural male employment in agriculture have had a negative effect on urbanization in India. On the other hand, higher consumption of fertilizer, state government expenditure on agriculture, production of major crops (wheat, maize, jowar, and bajra), rural female employment in agriculture, and rural literacy rate have had a positive impact on urbanization. The results also show that the effect of agriculture productivity is positive on urbanization for a less trade open economy like India. Finally, it is suggested that there is need of higher agricultural development in order to achieve a higher level of urbanization in India. For this purpose use of technology in agriculture sector along with higher level rural education is required. Finally, we need to have balanced rural and urban policy for a smooth rural- urban transformation in India.
    Keywords: Agriculture activity, Urbanization, India
    JEL: O13 Q10 R10
    Date: 2017–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:76213&r=agr
  3. By: Bachewe, Fantu Nisrane; Yimer, Feiruz; Minten, Bart
    Abstract: Expanding and extending an earlier assessment (ESSP Working Paper 88, April 2016), we analyze the evolution of crop and livestock producer prices and wages of unskilled laborers in Ethiopia between January 2014 and June 2016 to evaluate the effect of El Niño triggered droughts – which started in 2015 – that massively impacted parts of the country. The analyses reveal no evidence of widespread adverse price effects of the drought in cereal and labor markets. Real prices of major cereals were lower in the middle of 2016 compared to two years earlier, especially for maize, sorghum, and wheat – the crops that are the major source of calories in areas that were most hit by the drought. The decline in the cost of cereals in the food basket in June 2016 compared to two years earlier was estimated at 12.6 percent at the national level. Moreover, this decline in cereal costs was highest in areas most affected by the drought, possibly indicating the effect of major cereal imports and food aid directed to these areas. Considering crop and livestock prices jointly, the analysis reveals that livestock-cereal terms of trade improved. This is mainly because, although livestock prices declined during this period – as is usually seen in droughts, this decline was less than the decline in prices of cereals in such areas. The fluctuating behavior of cereal prices since January 2015 strikingly contrasts with the El Niño triggered major drought during 1997/98 in Ethiopia. During that period, cereal production declined by 25 percent compared to the year before, with significant increases in real price of cereals, ranging between 15 and 45 percent. In contrast, in 2016 real cereal prices declined, which appears consistent with the relatively larger cereal imports and lower impacts of the drought on national cereal production in 2015/16.
    Keywords: ETHIOPIA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, prices; droughts; livestock; crops; wages; labor; commodities; pulses; tubers; cereals; El Niño
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:esspwp:97&r=agr
  4. By: Briones, Roehlano M.
    Abstract: The commonly touted solution to achieve food security has always been articulated as achieving self-sufficiency in rice. Since the 1960s, various government regimes have articulated strategies and executed actions to achieve this much-vaunted goal. It has been over half a century, but we have yet to realize this dream. At this point, looking at the hard facts and the numbers, the picture it paints is not pretty. Achieving rice self-sufficiency comes with a price, and let us take a sober look at what it really costs.
    Keywords: Philippines, food security, agriculture, rice production, rice, rice self-sufficiency, farming
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2016-50&r=agr
  5. By: Reyes, Celia M.; Mina, Christian D.; Agbon, Adrian D.; Gloria, Reneli Ann B.
    Abstract: While agricultural insurance has long been considered a risk management tool for farmers in both developing and developed economies, policy directions toward sustainability vary across countries. Reviewing the literature provides a comprehensive view of relevant issues, such as objectives of the program, credit access by farmers, program costs, and premium subsidies provided by the national and local governments. This paper provides insights on how agricultural insurance programs from selected developed and developing economies were implemented. Learning from different country experiences, agricultural insurance is important yet costly to implement. Private insurance companies complement with the government-run insurance company to improve coverage rates. Targeting eligible beneficiaries is crucial in the success of a highly subsidized agricultural insurance, especially in developing economies.
    Keywords: Philippines, crop insurance, agricultural insurance, developed economies, developing economies
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2017-02&r=agr
  6. By: Eum, Jihyun; Sheldon, Ian
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252435&r=agr
  7. By: Reyes, Celia M.; Mina, Christian D.; Agbon, Adrian D.; Gloria, Reneli Ann B.
    Abstract: Providing agricultural insurance to farmers and fisherfolk in the Philippines has been implemented for nearly three decades. While it is agreed that agricultural insurance is crucial in assisting farmers, fisherfolk, and governments in lessening the negative financial impact of natural events, issues of providing premium subsidies and being tied to credit in the Philippines remain to be important policy issues. This paper reviews available information about partnerships between local government units (LGUs) and the Philippine Crop Insurance Corporation. The aim is to look at these innovations that may promote and enhance agricultural insurance in the Philippines. Providing for full premium subsidies and as a form of loan to the farmers was implemented by the LGUs reviewed in this paper. Further study is needed to determine which scheme works best in terms of increasing coverage over the long term and ensuring financial viability.
    Keywords: Philippines, farmers, subsidy, Philippine Crop Insurance Corporation, agricultural insurance, local government units (LGUs), fisherfolk, local government units, financial impact
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2017-01&r=agr
  8. By: Aliev, Jovidon
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250089&r=agr
  9. By: Mina, Christian D.; Imai, Katsushi S.
    Abstract: Using the panel data for the Philippines in 2003-2009, the paper estimates a three-level random coefficient model to measure household vulnerability and to decompose it into idiosyncratic and covariate components. It corrects heterogeneity bias using Bell and Jones's (2015) "within-between" formulation. A majority of the poor and 18 percent of the nonpoor are found to be vulnerable to unobservable shocks, while both groups of households are more susceptible to idiosyncratic shocks than to covariate shocks. Adequate safety nets should be provided for vulnerable households that lack access to infrastructure, or are larger in size with more dependents and less-educated household heads.
    Keywords: Philippines, poverty, vulnerability, multilevel model, panel data
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2016-10_(revised)&r=agr
  10. By: Iyigun, Murat; Nunn, Nathan; Qian, Nancy
    Abstract: This paper investigates the long-run effects of climate change on conflict by examining cooling from 1400-1900 CE, a period that includes most of the Little Ice Age. We construct a geo-referenced and digitized database of conflicts in Europe, North Africa, and the Near East from 1400-1900, which we merge with historical temperature data. We first show that during this time, cooling is associated with increased conflict. Then, turning to the dynamics of cooling, we allow the effects of cooling over a fifty-year period to depend on the extent of cooling during the preceding fifty-year period. We find that the effect of cooling on conflict is significantly larger if the same location experienced cooling during the preceding period. We interpret this as evidence that the adverse effect of climate change intensifies with its duration.
    Keywords: Development; economic history; Environment; political economy
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11760&r=agr
  11. By: V. Santoni; M. Pulina
    Abstract: Public subsidies to the agricultural sector are aimed to promote growth and sustainability. Considering the importance of the agricultural sector in Italy, especially in Sardinia, the impact of public subsidies on the agricultural production is assessed over the span time 2007-2013, that is the time period in which the effects exerted by the Fischler's reform can be detected. A Cobb Douglas growth model is employed to test such an impact at a micro level. While public intervention is likely to reduce the uncertainty of farm incomes, the findings reveal that decoupled public payments have a negative effect on the sector.
    Keywords: decoupled payments; public subsidies; panel data
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cns:cnscwp:201611&r=agr
  12. By: Wixe, Sofia (Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE), Jönköping International Business School, Sweden); Nilsson, Pia (Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE), Jönköping International Business School, Swede); Naldi, Lucia (Centre for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO ), Jönköping International Business School, Sweden); Westlund, Hans (Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE), Jönköping International Business School, & KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)
    Abstract: This paper applies unique survey data on innovation and external interaction of small food producers in Sweden. The overall purpose is to test if firms that are more engaged in external interaction are more innovative. To disentangle innovativeness beyond new goods and services, innovation is measured as new processes, new markets, new suppliers, new ways of organization, and new distributors. Findings point to a positive relationship between firm innovation and external interaction, both in terms of collaboration, external knowledge and support from regional actors. In particular, collaboration regarding transports and sales is shown to enhance most types of innovation. Product and process innovation benefit from external knowledge from extra-regional firms as well as regional support from the largest firm. Findings suggest that current innovation policies can improve their efficiency by increasing their flexibility to enable tailor-made innovation policies at the local level.
    Keywords: Innovation; collaboration; food industry; rural regions
    JEL: L25 L66 O31 R12
    Date: 2017–01–16
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0446&r=agr
  13. By: Boyer, Christopher; Harmon, Xavier; Lambert, Dayton; Larson, James; Donald, Tyler
    Keywords: Cotton, Cover crops, Tillage, Risk, Farm Management, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252482&r=agr
  14. By: Nelson, Gerald C.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252438&r=agr
  15. By: Thevs, Niels; Strenge, Eva; Aliev, Kumar; Baibagysov, Azim; Eraaliev, Maksat; Lang, Petra; Thomas, Frank
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2016–11–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:249994&r=agr
  16. By: Matthews, Alan
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252431&r=agr
  17. By: Ivelin Iliev Rizov (European Commission – JRC)
    Abstract: The Technical Working Group (TWG) for Cotton is the third one of the European Coexistence Bureau (ECoB) and is established for elaboration of the coexistence issues between genetically modified (GM) cotton cultivation and non-GM cotton and honey production in the EU. The present technical report analysed the possible sources for potential cross-pollination with GM cotton and adventitious admixture of GM cotton material such as seeds and pollen and presents consensually agreed by TWG for Cotton best practices for coexistence. The terms of reference for this review are presented in Section 1. The scope of the Best Practice Document is coexistence in cotton production in the EU. It includes the coexistence between GM cotton cultivation and honey production but excludes coexistence in seed production. The ECoB TWG for Cotton held two meetings in October 2014 and April 2015 and examined the state-of-the-art from scientific literature, research projects and empirical evidence provided by existing studies for segregation in cotton production looking at the factors determining the cross-pollination rates in cotton as well as other sources of admixture of GM material in conventional cotton harvests and EU-produced honey. The review of this information (coming from a total of 194 references) is presented in a structured manner in Sections 5 and 6 of this document. Finally, the TWG for Cotton reviewed the up todate approaches for the detection and identification of traces of GM cotton material in non-GM cotton harvests and honey (Section 7). The TWG for Cotton of the ECoB, based on the analysis of the evidence summarised in this document submitted proposals for best management practices, which form the ground the agreed consensus recommendations presented in Section 8, complemented by ex-ante view about their economic impact (Section 9).
    Keywords: inovation, biotechnology, coexistence, genetically modified organism (GMOs), cotton, best agricultural practices, agronomy, policy support, standatization, compititivness
    Date: 2016–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc101485&r=agr
  18. By: Reyes, Celia M.; Gloria, Reneli Ann B.
    Abstract: There are many and varied government programs that target the agriculture and fisheries sector, especially the poor. For more efficient and streamlined program targeting, the Aquino administration has initiated the creation of the Registry Service for Basic Sectors in Agriculture (RSBSA), a list of farmers, farm workers, and fisherfolk in the 75 provinces of the country excluding the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao and the National Capital Region. This is currently used by the Department of Budget and Management to target beneficiaries of various government agencies implementing agricultural support programs, and as a basis for issuing allocated budgets for these programs. This paper finds that there are legitimate agricultural producers that are excluded from the list, leakages, difficulty of the registry to be linked with other government databases, and unclear operational definition of farmer. But despite its shortcomings, the authors find that the RSBSA is useful as a targeting tool; the list just needs to be validated and regularly updated.
    Keywords: Philippines, agricultural insurance, Registry Service for Basic Sectors in Agriculture (RSBSA), program beneficiary targeting, Department of Budget and Management, agricultural credit
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2017-03&r=agr
  19. By: Brink, Lars; Orden, David
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252422&r=agr
  20. By: Zhu, Manhong
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252430&r=agr
  21. By: Lerman, Zvi
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250093&r=agr
  22. By: Melo, Grace
    Keywords: Shelf nutrition labels, NuVal, Two-part Model, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Marketing, Q18, D12,
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:252421&r=agr
  23. By: Grings, Michael
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250090&r=agr
  24. By: Brink, Lars
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252423&r=agr
  25. By: Moore, Frances C.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252437&r=agr
  26. By: Kamal Saggi; Mark Wu
    Abstract: Trade in agricultural products raises sensitivities, particularly when imports originate from a trading partner experiencing an outbreak of some type of agricultural disease. In this article, we explain why despite the negative externalities associated with diseased imports, an importing country is generally not permitted to ban such imports outright under WTO law. Rather, it is allowed to do so only under fairly specific circumstances. We also highlight how the recent India – Agricultural Products ruling contributes to the jurisprudence of two issues concerning the SPS Agreement: the interpretation of international standards, and the relationship between the risk assessment and scientific evidence requirements.
    Keywords: WTO, agricultural trade, bird flu, avian influenza, SPS Agreement
    JEL: F13
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rsc:rsceui:2016/64&r=agr
  27. By: Duvaleix-Treguer, Sabine; Emlinger, Charlotte; Gaigne, Carl; Latouche, Karine
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Marketing,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252436&r=agr
  28. By: Suh, Dong Hee
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea17:251888&r=agr
  29. By: Ilysov, Jarilkasin
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250086&r=agr
  30. By: Sedik, David
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, International Development,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250072&r=agr
  31. By: Cororaton, Caesar B.; Orden, David
    Keywords: Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), Regional trade, United States, European Union 28, Global computable general equilibrium (CGE) model, Tariffs, Non-tariff measures (NTM), Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, C68, D58, F15,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252425&r=agr
  32. By: Schmidt, Emily; Bekele, Firew
    Abstract: This paper examines labor diversification in Ethiopia, focusing on youth, and explores current conditions that youth face in both the agricultural and non-farm labor markets. Using data from the Ethiopia Socioeconomic Survey (ESS) and the National Labor Force Survey (NLFS), we explore current trends in labor diversification, along with youth non-farm engagement in rural and small towns. We find that youth (ages 25 to 34 years) have a greater probability of working in non-farm enterprises compared to mature individuals (age 35-64). However, wage labor opportunities remain scant in rural Ethiopia. The majority of individuals working in non-farm employment are engaged in small-scale trade activities.
    Keywords: ETHIOPIA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, youth, employment, economic development, off farm employment
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:esspwp:98&r=agr
  33. By: Yoon, Jongyeol; Brown, Scott
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252428&r=agr
  34. By: Zafari, Khurshid; Ismailov, Azamat
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250075&r=agr
  35. By: Liu, Liyuan; Peng, Fei
    Abstract: Environmental protection against pollution has become a common issue faced by the whole world. In the case of the international cooperation on controlling the environmental pollution, the developing and developed countries have different understanding on the principle of “common but differentiated responsibilities”. This paper has set up an optimal pollution controlling model for the developing and developed countries to incorporate environmental protection and economic growth. Based on a dynamic differential game, we find that the increasing environmental expenditure of developed countries in the initial stage of the economic growth path of the developing country can stimulate more international cooperation on pollution controlling. The developing and developed countries can control the environment pollution without significant loss of social welfare.
    Keywords: Environment pollution; Economic growth; Game theory
    JEL: C71 O44 Q52 Q56
    Date: 2015–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:76261&r=agr
  36. By: Saak, Alexander
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250087&r=agr
  37. By: Darbandi, Elham
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2016–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iats16:252429&r=agr
  38. By: Bulatov, Dmitry
    Abstract: The selected paper presented at the IAMO Samarkand Conference
    Keywords: International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2016–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iamc16:250068&r=agr
  39. By: Gobillon, Laurent; Wolff, François-Charles
    Abstract: In this paper, we investigate the effect on quality, quantity and prices of an innovative fishing gear introduced for a subsample of vessels on a single wholesale fish market in France. Estimations are conducted using transaction data over the 2009-2011 period during which the innovation was introduced. Using a difference-in-differences approach around the discontinuity, we find that for the treated the innovation has a large effect on quality (29.2 percentage points) and prices (23.2 percentage points). A shift in caught fish species is observed and new targeted species are fished very intensively. We also quantify the treatment effect on the treated market from aggregate market data using factor models and a synthetic control approach. We find a sizable effect of the innovation on market quality which is consistent with non-treated vessels adapting their fishing practices to remain competitive. The innovation has no effect on market quantities and prices.
    Keywords: difference in differences; discontinuity; factor models; fish; innovation; product prices; product quality; synthetic controls
    JEL: L11 Q22
    Date: 2017–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11757&r=agr

This nep-agr issue is ©2017 by Angelo Zago. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.