nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2015‒08‒07
118 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Dairy Farmer Willingness to Supply Animal Welfare Related Practices By Wolf, Christopher A.; Tonsor, Glynn T.
  2. Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program By Wohlman, Matthew
  3. Supporting Profitability with Climate-Smart Agriculture By Nelson, Gerald
  4. Defining Climate-Smart Agriculture By Steenwerth, Kerri
  5. Outlook for the Cane Refining Industry By Farmer, Paul
  6. Low Price Impacts on Farm Program Payments and Farm Income By Schnitkey, Gary
  7. The Interplay among Consumers, USDA Nutrition Assistance Programs, and Producers in Food and Agricultural Markets By Leibtag, Ephraim
  8. New Partnerships, Markets, & Infrastructure for Water By Cochran, Bobby
  9. Land reforms and feminization of agricultural labor in Sughd province, Tajikistan By Mukhamedova, Nozilakhon; Wegerich, Kai
  10. TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGERIAL GAPS IN THE ADOPTION OF IMPROVED GROUNDNUT VARIETIES IN MALAWI AND UGANDA By Amponsah, Kwabena; Paliwal, Neha
  11. Current and Future Water Scarcity By Brown, Thomas
  12. Roundtable Discussion on Agriculture By Vilsack, Tom; Hogan, Phil
  13. Retail Food Price Outlook By Kuhn, Annemarie
  14. Adaptation of U.S. Agricultural Production to Drought and Climate Change By Woodard, Joshua D.; Chiu Verteramo, Leslie; Miller, Alyssa P.
  15. Genome Sequencing and Its Prospects for Improving Food Safety By White, David
  16. Understanding the role of government on agri-food private standards in developed countries: Preliminary empirical evidence from Canada By Herath, Deepananda; Bonti-Ankomah, Samuel
  17. Demand Spillovers of Food Recalls in Differentiated Product Markets By Rudi, Jeta; Çakir, Metin
  18. Food Safety Through Data Sharing and Socialization By Schroeder, Carl
  19. Tracking Turnips and Other Measures of Food Literacy Education: The Impact of a School-based Intervention on Children’s Attitudes, Knowledge and Food Choices By Kiesel, Kristin; Stott, Amber
  20. Commodity Effects of Food Away From Home By Binkley, James K.; Liu, Yuhang
  21. Impacts of Federal Crop Insurance on Land Use and Environmental Quality By Claassen, Roger; Langpap, Christian; Wu, JunJie
  22. Contract-farming in staple food chains: the case of rice in Benin By Vande Velde, Katrien; Maertens, Miet
  23. Water and Farm Efficiency: Insights from the Frontier Literature By Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Jara-Rojas, Roberto; Lachaud, Michee A.; Moreira L., Victor H.; Scheierling, Susanne M.
  24. Outsourcing Agricultural Production: Evidence from Rice Farmers in Zhejiang Province By Guo, Hongdong; Ji, Chen; Jin, Songqing; Huang, Zuhui
  25. Market News in the Americas By Day, Lloyd
  26. Climate change adaptation through agricultural R&D investments: Implications for food security and the environment By Baldos, Uris Lantz C.; Hertel, Thomas W.; Fuglie, Keith O.
  27. Impacts of the Food Safety Modernization Act on On-Farm Food Safety Practices for Small and Sustainable Produce Growers By Adalja, Aaron; Lichtenberg, Erik
  28. Copula-Based Modeling of Dependence Structure among International Food Grain Markets By Ahmed, Mansur; Goodwin, Barry
  29. LOCAL FOOD SYSTEM INVESTMENT: A PROPOSAL FOR A NOVEL AND TARGETED APPROACH By Boys, Kathryn A.; Donovan, Patricia
  30. Meeting Regulatory Needs with Voluntary Conservation By Hartley, Christopher
  31. Water Scarcity: Who’s the Gorilla in the Room? By Richardson, James
  32. The Impact of Agricultural Subsidies on the Corn Market with Farm Heterogeneity and Endogenous Entry and Exit By Devadoss, Stephen; Gibson, Mark J.; Luckstead, Jeff
  33. Climate-Change Impacts on Agriculture and Food Markets: Combining a Micro-Level Structural Land-Use Model and a Market-Level Equilibrium Model By Kan, Iddo; Kimhi, Ayal; Kaminski, Jonathan
  34. Agricultural Producer Responses to Weather and Surface Water Variability: Implications for Climate Change By Manning, Dale T.; Goemans, Chris; Maas, Alex
  35. Global production of biofuels in the context of food security By Rosiak, Ewa; Łopaciuk, Wiesław; Szajner, Piotr; Grochowska, Renata
  36. Environmental livelihood security in Southeast Asia and Oceania: a water-energy-food-livelihoods nexus approach for spatially assessing change. White paper By Biggs, E. M.; Boruff, B.; Bruce, E.; Duncan, J. M. A.; Haworth, B. J.; Duce, S.; Horsley, J.; Curnow, Jayne; Neef, A.; McNeill, K.; Pauli, N.; Van Ogtrop, F.; Imanari, Y.
  37. Can Land and Food Entitlement Reduce Conflict: Evidence from Violence Prone Eastern DR Congo By Fatema, Naureen; Kibriya, Shahriar
  38. Geographical Indications as a Tool for More Sustainable Food Systems By Vandecandelaere, Emilie
  39. Evaluating the Impact of Proposed Farm Bill Programs with Crop Insurance for Southern Crops By Davis, Todd; Anderson, John A.; Smith, Nathan
  40. Household Income Volatility in U.S. Farm Households By Key, Nigel; Prager, Daniel; Burns, Christopher
  41. Food Safety and the Demand for Leafy Greens By Tselepidakis, Elina
  42. Confronting Energy, Food, and Climate Challenges – Analyzing Tradeoffs in Agriculture and Land Use Change By Cai, Yongxia; Beach, Robert H.
  43. Common Names or Protected Property? A US Perspective on Strengthening GI Protection By Babcock, Bruice A.
  44. Evaluating the Historical Factors Influencing U.S. Agricultural Policy By Farnsworth, Derek; Moss, Charles B.
  45. Are Organic Beverages Substitutes for Non-Organic Counterparts? Household-Level Semi-parametric Censored Demand Systems Approach By Dharmasena, Senarath; Kapilakanchana, Montalee; Capps, Oral. Jr
  46. Structural Consumer Upheaval: How The Meat Sector Can Adapt By Jones, Heather
  47. Price Volatility and Spillovers in Food and Fuel Markets By An, Henry; Qiu, Feng; Rude, James
  48. Impacts of Food Safety Regulations on Trade Flows: An Application to the Almond and Hazelnut Industries By Sisman, Muhammet Y.
  49. Achievements and challenges in the food sector and rural areas during the 10 years after EU enlargement By Anonymous; Wigier, Marek; Bułkowska, Małgorzata
  50. Black Sea countries: Grain production & exports By Sizov, Andrey
  51. Opening New Markets By Hafemeister, Jason
  52. Does the US use Food Safety Regulation as a Disguised Barrier to Trade? Evidence from Canadian Agri-food Commodity Exports. By Rollins, Emily R.
  53. Budget Analysis and Assessment of Investments in Water Smart Agriculture for Smallholders in Uganda and East Africa By Francis, Mwaura; Miriam, Katunze; Tony, Muhumuza; Isaac, Shinyekwa
  54. Water Productivity in Agriculture: Looking for Water in the Agricultural Productivity and Efficiency Literature By Scheierling, Susanne M.; Treguer, David O.; Booker, James F.
  55. Effects of credit and market access on farm gate prices in India By Baylis, Kathy; Mallory, Mindy; Songsermsawas, Tisorn
  56. Antimicrobial Resistance: Challenges for Agriculture and Health “Infectious Disease, Human Health, and Agriculture” By King, Lonnie
  57. Working Together to Thrive By Houston, Kate
  58. Garden space: Mapping trade-offs and the adaptive capacity of home food production By Dewaelheyns, Valerie; Lerouge, Frederik; Rogge, Elke; Vranken, Liesbet
  59. The Impacts of Food Safety Incidents on U.S. Beef Trade: A Gravity Model Approach By Shang, Xia; Glynn, Tonsor
  60. Climate Change in the Andes: Predictions, Perceptions and Adaptation by Rice Farmers By Useche, Pilar; Anglade, Boaz
  61. Fighting Scarcity: Innovation & Comprehensive Strategies to Address Our Water Challenges By Huminston, Glenda
  62. Adapting Community Supported Agriculture to Modern Markets – Where is it Working? By Woods, Timothy; Tropp, Debra
  63. Rice Farmers’ Production Efficiency under Abiotic Stresses: the Case of Bangladesh By Mottaleb, Khandoker; Khanal, Aditya R.; Mishra, Ashok; Mohanty, Samrendu
  64. An Empirical Structural Model of Productivity and the Conservation Reserve Program Participation By Jang, Heesun; Du, Xiaodong
  65. What Explains the Share of Farm Loss Systemic with County Loss? By Lim, Jinsoon; Kim, Sanghyo; Zulauf, Carl
  66. Effects From a Farmer-led Collective Action Water Management Plan on Irrigators in Kansas By Drysdale, Krystal M.; Hendricks, Nathan P.
  67. What Outcome to Expect On Geographical Indications in the TTIP Free Trade Agreement Negotiations with the United States? By Matthews, Alan
  68. Determinants of Water Sales During Droughts: Evidence from Rice Farm-Level Data in California By Chaudhry, Anita M.; Fairbanks, Dean H.K.; Caldwell, Alyssa
  69. Impact of credit constraints on profitability and productivity in U.S. agriculture By Sabasi, Darlington; Kompaniyets, Lyudmyla
  70. U.S. Crop Yields Redux: Weather Effects versus Human Inputs By Trindade, Federico J.
  71. Changing patterns of global agri-food trade and virtual water flows By Schwarz, Jana; Mathijs, Erik; Maertens, Miet
  72. Rail Renaissance: The Changing Dynamics of Freight Transportation By Miller, John
  73. Consumer Demand for Dairy Alternative Beverages in the United States and its Implications to U.S. Dairy Industry By Copeland, Alicia; Dharmasena, Senarath
  74. Land Allocation Dynamics in China among Five Top Staple Crops: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Rice, and Cotton from 1985-2009 By Vorotnikova, Ekaterina; Seale, James
  75. Nonfarm Work and Fertilizer Use Among Smallholder Farmers in Kenya: A Cross-Crop Comparison By Smale, Melinda; Mathenge, Mary K.; Opiyo, Joseph
  76. Dealing With Drought at the Regional Level: The California Crisis By Velasco, Ryan
  77. The Contribution of Biomass to Emissions Mitigation under a Global Climate Policy By Winchester, Niven; Reilly, John M.
  78. Scale Heterogeneity, Consequentiality, and Willingness-to-Pay for Public Goods: The Case of Beef Choices By Li, Xiaogu; Jensen, Kimberly L.; Clark, Christopher D.; Lambert, Dayton M.
  79. Willingness to Pay for Eco-labeled Fresh Strawberry: Are All Environmentally Friendly Techniques Equal? By Chen, Xuqi; Gao, Zhifeng; Swisher, Marilyn; House, Lisa A.
  80. Diseases & Pesticides Affecting Bee Health By Rosalind, James
  81. Demand for Differentiated Products: A Case of Shell Eggs By Heng, Yan
  82. Household Whole and Low Fat Milk Consumption in Poland: A Bivariate Two-part Model By Fu, Shengfei; Klepacka, Anna M.; Florkowski, Wojciech J.
  83. Moral Hazard in Prevented Planting and Late Planting By Kim, Taehoo; Kim, Man-Keun
  84. Greek-Style Yogurt as a Protein Alternative in Child Nutrition in the National School Lunch Program in the United States By Dharmasena, Senarath; Murano, Peter
  85. The Value of Market News By Lehman, Dave
  86. Argentina's Agricultural Policies By Ridley, William; Devadoss, Stephen
  87. Anaerobic Digester Production and Cost Functions By Cowley, Cortney; Brorsen, B. Wade
  88. Farm-level economic impacts of EU-CAP greening measures By Louhichi, Kamel; Ciaian, Pavel; Espinosa, Maria; Colen, Liesbeth; Perni, Angel; Gomez y Paloma, Sergio
  89. Elasticity of Demand for Cigarettes in the US: Evidence from Quantile Regression Analysis By Heboyan, Vahe; Hovhannisyan, Vardges
  90. Brazil’s Response to Lower Commodity Prices By Cordonnier, Michael
  91. Analysis of the Structural Changes in Vietnamese Households’ Food Demand: 2010 to 2030 By Hoang, Hoa K.; Meyers, William H.
  92. Mislabelling in Collective Labels: an experimental analysis By Bonroy, Olivier; Garapin, Alexis; Hamilton, Stephen F.; Souza Monteiro, Diogo M.
  93. The Effect of Gender on Productivity Status in U.S. Agriculture By Harris, J. Michael; Williams, Robert P.; Mishra, Ashok K.
  94. Seafood Safety and Marketing: The Case of the Deepwater Horizon Tragedy By Vickner, Steven S.
  95. Is irrigated farm is more efficient than non-irrigated non-tillage farm and non-irrigated conventional farm for a sample of Kansas corn farmer? By Wibowo, Rulianda P.; Featherstone, Allen M.
  96. Adaptive Behavior of U.S. Farms to Climate and Risk By Sung, Jae-hoon; Miranowski, John A.
  97. Do Farmers Really Plant Apples for Their Income and Cherries for Their Retirement? The Effects of Risk, Scope and Scale on Orchard Land Allocation By Zhao, Xin; Brady, Michael P.; Tozer, Peter R.
  98. Determinants and Extant of Crop Diversification Among Smallholder Farmers in Southern Zambia By Sichoongwe, Kiru
  99. Crop Insurance’s Role in Farm Solvency By Kuethe, Todd H.; Paulson, Nicholas; Schnitkey, Gary
  100. Linking apple farmers to markets: Determinants and impacts of marketing contracts in China By Ma, Wanglin; Abdulai, Awudu
  101. Brazil's Agricultural Total Factor Productivity Growth by Farm Size By Helfand, Steven M.; Magalhaes, Marcelo M.; Rada, Nicholas E.
  102. The Balanced Scorecard as a Management Tool for Arable Farming By Paustian, Margit; Wellner, Marie; Theuvsen, Ludwig
  103. Geographical Indications, Upgrading and the Competitiveness of Small-scale Producers: A Case Study of the Makó Onion PDO By Gorton, Matthew; Török, Aron; Tregear, Angela
  104. Why Do Manufacturers of Leading National Brands Produce Private Labels for Food Retailers? By Xia, Tian; Li, Xianghong
  105. Mechanisms of Patent Licensing for Varietal Innovation By Sapkota, Pratikshya; Gallardo, Karina; McCluskey, Jill; Rickard, Bradley
  106. U.S. Ethanol Demand and World Hunger: Is There Any Connection? By Hao, Na; Colson, Greg; Wetzstein, Michael
  107. The Effect of Taxes on Capital Structure in Farm Supply and Marketing Cooperatives By Russell, Levi A.; Briggeman, Brian C.
  108. Consumers’ purchasing trends of GIs products By Mattas, Konstadinos; Tsakiridou, Efthimia; Theodoridou, Glykeria
  109. Feasibility of new agricultural futures contract: a study in the Brazilian rice market By Capitani, Daniel H.D.; Mattos, Fabio
  110. The Industrial Reorganization of US Agriculture as Reflected in Input-Output Accounts By Han, Yicheol; Goetz, Stephan J.
  111. Willingness to Adopt Best Management Practices Among Beef Cattle Producers in Southeastern Tennessee By Medwid, Laura J.; Signore, Alicia M.; Lambert, Dayton M.; Clark, Christopher D.; Vossler, Christian A.; Walker, Forbes R.; Hawkins, Shawn A.
  112. Education Accelerating the Agricultural Transformation: Panel Data Analysis of Rural Mexico By Charlton, Diane; Taylor, J. Edward
  113. A Functional Approach to Test Trending Volatility: Evidence of Trending Volatility in the Price of Mexican Agricultural Products By Guerrero-Escobar, Santiago; Hernandez-Del Valle, Gerardo; Juarez-Torres, Miriam
  114. Price Discovery and Risk Management in the U.S. Distiller’s Grain Markets By Etienne, Xiaoli L.; Hoffman, Linwood A.
  115. A socio economic assessment of yield increasing GM wheat in Germany By Wree, Philipp; Sauer, Johannes
  116. Common Shocks, Uncommon Effects: Food Price Inflation across the EU By Lloyd, Tim; McCorriston, Steve; Morgan, Wyn; Zvogu, Evious
  117. Risk Reducing Effects of the Dairy Security Act on Southern Dairies By Herbst, Brian K.; Anderson, David P.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Richardson, James W.; Mazurkiewicz, Stephanie
  118. How much do Experiential Measures of Food Security Tell us About Nutrition? By Tandon, Sharad

  1. By: Wolf, Christopher A.; Tonsor, Glynn T.
    Keywords: animal welfare, dairy farm, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205635&r=agr
  2. By: Wohlman, Matthew
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205005&r=agr
  3. By: Nelson, Gerald
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205019&r=agr
  4. By: Steenwerth, Kerri
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205031&r=agr
  5. By: Farmer, Paul
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205044&r=agr
  6. By: Schnitkey, Gary
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Farm Management, Political Economy,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205021&r=agr
  7. By: Leibtag, Ephraim
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204993&r=agr
  8. By: Cochran, Bobby
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204985&r=agr
  9. By: Mukhamedova, Nozilakhon; Wegerich, Kai
    Abstract: This report analyzes the influence of agrarian transformations on the feminization of agricultural production in rural Tajikistan. It explores women’s multiple labor relations for meeting basic needs of the household. The evidence shows that households have to depend on more types of agricultural work to secure day-to-day as well as long-term livelihood security. Overall, feminization appears in different types and groupings. The implication is that women in agriculture might not be adequately targeted in policies or integrated within intervention programs.
    Keywords: Land reform Feminization Gender Women Female labor Employment Agriculture sector Farms Households Poverty Income Water user associations Case studies, Farm Management, Food Security and Poverty,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iwmirp:201007&r=agr
  10. By: Amponsah, Kwabena; Paliwal, Neha
    Keywords: Production, Productivity, Technology Adoption, Technical efficiency, Improved groundnut varieties, propensity score matching, Malawi, Uganda, Sub-Saharan Africa, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, International Development, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2015–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206197&r=agr
  11. By: Brown, Thomas
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205007&r=agr
  12. By: Vilsack, Tom; Hogan, Phil
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, Institutional and Behavioral Economics,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:206471&r=agr
  13. By: Kuhn, Annemarie
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204978&r=agr
  14. By: Woodard, Joshua D.; Chiu Verteramo, Leslie; Miller, Alyssa P.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Farm Management, Food Security and Poverty, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205903&r=agr
  15. By: White, David
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205017&r=agr
  16. By: Herath, Deepananda; Bonti-Ankomah, Samuel
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Industrial Organization, Q18 Q13,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205329&r=agr
  17. By: Rudi, Jeta; Çakir, Metin
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–05–26
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205313&r=agr
  18. By: Schroeder, Carl
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205013&r=agr
  19. By: Kiesel, Kristin; Stott, Amber
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206394&r=agr
  20. By: Binkley, James K.; Liu, Yuhang
    Abstract: In this counter-factually analysis, we have shown that the elimination of food away from home would have large effects on the composition of American diet. This implies that the growth of FAFH has changed on the structure of agricultural production and the nature of food demand.
    Keywords: Food Away From home, Change of American Diet, Change of agricultural production, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205052&r=agr
  21. By: Claassen, Roger; Langpap, Christian; Wu, JunJie
    Abstract: This paper integrates economic and physical models to assess how federal crop revenue insurance programs might affect land use, cropping systems, and environmental quality in the U.S. Corn Belt region. The empirical framework includes econometric models that predict land conversion, crop choices, and crop rotations at the parcel-level based on expectation and variance of crop revenues, land quality, climate conditions, and physical characteristics at each site. The predictions are then combined with site-specific environmental production functions to determine the effect of revenue insurance on nitrate runoff and leaching, soil water and wind erosion, and carbon sequestration. Results suggest that crop insurance will have small impacts on conversions of non-cropland to cropland, and somewhat more significant impacts on crop choice. These changes in crop mix have small impacts on agricultural pollution.
    Keywords: Crop Insurance, Revenue Insurance, Crop Choice, Environmental Quality, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Risk and Uncertainty, Q18, Q28,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205340&r=agr
  22. By: Vande Velde, Katrien; Maertens, Miet
    Abstract: Supply chain upgrading in domestic and staple food chains in developing countries is important for a more efficient supply to growing urban markets. Little research is done on institutional innovations, such as contract-farming, in these chains. Research on the impact of smallholder contract-farming largely focuses on export-oriented high-value commodities. In this paper, we assess the welfare implications of smallholder contract-farming in the rice sector in Benin, using farm-household survey data and applying propensity score matching and difference-in-difference estimation. We find that contract-farming is associated with higher rice incomes, higher yields, higher input use, increased commercialization and higher farm-gate prices.
    Keywords: contract-farming, vertical coordination, staple food chains, rice, Benin, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Security and Poverty, Q13, O12, D13, L32,
    Date: 2014–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:kucawp:189419&r=agr
  23. By: Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Jara-Rojas, Roberto; Lachaud, Michee A.; Moreira L., Victor H.; Scheierling, Susanne M.
    Keywords: Irrigation Water Use, Technical Efficiency, Agriculture, Meta-­‐Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Productivity Analysis, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Q25, Q12, D24,
    Date: 2015–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206076&r=agr
  24. By: Guo, Hongdong; Ji, Chen; Jin, Songqing; Huang, Zuhui
    Abstract: China has recorded positive grain production growth rates for the past eleven consecutive years. This is a remarkable achievement given that China’s rapid industrialization and urbanization has led to a vast reduction of arable land and agricultural labor to non-agricultural sectors. While there are many factors contributing to this happy outcome of China’s grain production, one contributing factor that has begun to receive increasing attention is the emergence of agricultural outsourcing, a new rural institution that has emerged in recent years. This study aims to contribute to the limited but growing literature on agricultural outsourcing in China. Specifically, this study analyzes factors affecting farmers’ decisions to outsource any or some production tasks using data from rice farmers in Zhejiang province. Results from a logistic model show that farm size, prices, and government subsidy encourage farmers to outsource while ownership of agricultural machines and land fragmentation have negative effects on farmers decisions to outsource any task. Results also showed that determinants of outsourcing decisions vary with the production tasks that farmers outsourced.
    Keywords: Determinants, agricultural outsourcing, rice farmers, Zhejiang Province, China, Crop Production/Industries, Production Economics, D24, O12, O13,
    Date: 2015–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206079&r=agr
  25. By: Day, Lloyd
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205003&r=agr
  26. By: Baldos, Uris Lantz C.; Hertel, Thomas W.; Fuglie, Keith O.
    Keywords: Climate Change Mitigation, Climate Change Adaptation, Total Factor Productivity Growth, Agricultural R&D Investments, Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Production Economics,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205747&r=agr
  27. By: Adalja, Aaron; Lichtenberg, Erik
    Abstract: We use data from a national survey of fruit and vegetable growers to examine the current prevalence and cost burden of food safety practices required in the proposed Produce Rule implementing the Food Safety Modernization Act. In particular, we analyze the influence of farm size and farming practices on the probability of adopting food safety measures that would be required by the Produce Rule; and we analyze how the costs of using those food safety practices vary by farm size and farm practices. Majorities of our respondents currently employ most of the food safety practices that would be required under the proposed Produce Rule, but a large number of growers will nonetheless face significant changes to meet the Rule’s requirements. We do not find any effect of farm size on the probability of using food safety measures, but we find that food safety costs significant economies of scale. Sustainable farming practices are negatively correlated with the probability of testing and conducting field inspections, and they are associated with increased costs for testing and sampling, harvest container sanitation, and written records relative to conventional growers. While our estimates indicate that small and sustainable growers would face more significant changes and more burdensome costs to comply with the proposed Produce Rule, in our sample most of them would ultimately be exempt from the rule either based on farm size or the Tester-Hagan exemption.
    Keywords: food safety, Food Safety Modernization Act, Produce Rule, compliance cost, regulatory burden, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, I18, Q18, Q13,
    Date: 2015–05–26
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205322&r=agr
  28. By: Ahmed, Mansur; Goodwin, Barry
    Keywords: Dependence Structure, Commodity Prices, Copulas, Price Boom, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Q11 Q17 Q18,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206059&r=agr
  29. By: Boys, Kathryn A.; Donovan, Patricia
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2014–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162590&r=agr
  30. By: Hartley, Christopher
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204989&r=agr
  31. By: Richardson, James
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204999&r=agr
  32. By: Devadoss, Stephen; Gibson, Mark J.; Luckstead, Jeff
    Keywords: Agricultural subsidies, Heterogeneous firms, Entry and exit, Agricultural and Food Policy, Industrial Organization, Production Economics,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205889&r=agr
  33. By: Kan, Iddo; Kimhi, Ayal; Kaminski, Jonathan
    Abstract: This paper develops a structural micro-econometric model of farmland allocation that is linked to a market-level equilibrium model. The farmland-allocation model accounts for the presence of corner solutions in land allocation decisions, which enables using micro-level data for the estimation, and thereby allows treating prices as exogenous. Under partial equilibrium in the markets of vegetative products, the integrated model is then used to simulate the impacts of climate change on production, prices, agricultural profits and consumer surplus, while making explicit the production responses of the micro units used for estimating the land allocation model. We apply the model to Israeli data, and evaluate the combined effects of climate-change and implementation of a less trade-distorting agricultural support policy; specifically, the removal of import tariffs. We obtain negative impacts of climate change on farm profits and consumer’s surplus. Also, trade liberalization increases the overall welfare loss. We show that this conclusion is reversed if the link between the micro- and market-level models fails to capture heterogeneous production responses, thereby yielding an erroneous policy recommendation with respect to trade liberalization.
    Keywords: climate change, adaptation, agricultural land use, structural analysis, agricultural support policies, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Q15, Q18, Q11,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205128&r=agr
  34. By: Manning, Dale T.; Goemans, Chris; Maas, Alex
    Abstract: Climate change is predicted to bring increased temperatures and changes in water availability across the United States. Understanding the responsiveness of irrigated agriculture to changes in available water, both supplemental, and natural, is critical to evaluating the potential impacts of climage change as well as measuring the benefit of new water supply development. Despite representing only half the value of total agricultural sales in the US, previous literature has mostly focused on dryland agriculture, in large part because of the endogeneity of water applied. We develop a two-stage theoretical model of producer irrigation decisions and test the predictions from the model with a unique dataset that includes an exogenous shock to agricultural water supplies. We separately identify the impact of expected water supply on planting decisions and how realizations affect harvesting decisions and crop yields. As water supplies decrease, farmers respond by planting fewer acres and concentrating the application of water. Climate change simulations suggest that behavioral responses and the use of irrigation water can partially offset the impacts of higher temperatures in Colorado.
    Keywords: Climate Change, Irrigated Agriculture, Crop water optimization, Crop Production/Industries, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205784&r=agr
  35. By: Rosiak, Ewa; Łopaciuk, Wiesław; Szajner, Piotr; Grochowska, Renata
    Abstract: The main objective of the study is the issue of global production of biofuels in the context of food security. Production of biofuels and food security – competition and correlations. Raw materials for production of biofuels as compared to conditions on global markets. Global market of biofuels. Impact of production of biofuels on cereal market. Impact of production of biofuels on oilseed market.
    Keywords: food security, biofuels, cereal market, oilseed market, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepr:206005&r=agr
  36. By: Biggs, E. M.; Boruff, B.; Bruce, E.; Duncan, J. M. A.; Haworth, B. J.; Duce, S.; Horsley, J.; Curnow, Jayne; Neef, A.; McNeill, K.; Pauli, N.; Van Ogtrop, F.; Imanari, Y.
    Keywords: Environmental sustainability Environmental management Ecological factors Biodiversity Living standards Water security Energy conservation Food security Climate change Temperature Precipitation Cyclones Agriculture Farmland Demography Urbanization Sociocultural environment Gender Community management Institutions Political aspects Remote sensing Natural disasters Monitoring Sustainable development, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iwmirp:201005&r=agr
  37. By: Fatema, Naureen; Kibriya, Shahriar
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, International Development,
    Date: 2015–05–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205354&r=agr
  38. By: Vandecandelaere, Emilie
    Keywords: TTIP, GIs, Local Development, Rural Dvelopment, Sustainability, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Industrial Organization, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, International Development, Political Economy, Public Economics,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:206452&r=agr
  39. By: Davis, Todd; Anderson, John A.; Smith, Nathan
    Abstract: A five-year stochastic model of proposed House and Senate farm bill programs interacting with crop insurance was used to simulate distributions of per acre net revenue for Arkansas rice, Texas cotton, and Georgia peanuts. Certainty equivalents were used to analyze the effect of risk aversion on preferred risk management strategies.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Risk Management, Agricultural Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162409&r=agr
  40. By: Key, Nigel; Prager, Daniel; Burns, Christopher
    Abstract: Farm households are subject to several sources of income instability, including yield and production fluctuations, disasters such as droughts or disease, input and output price changes, and varying levels of off-farm income. This paper assesses the income variability of households operating family farms in the continental United States. We find that income volatility varies between farm household subgroups, such as farm size, commodity specialization, and geographic location and that volatility has decreased between 1998 and 2010. Regression analysis shows that households operating crop farms, larger farms, and more highly leveraged farms have higher levels of volatility. Finally, we decompose the sources of income variance and analyze the role of federal agricultural program payments in reducing volatility.
    Keywords: Income Volatility, Farm Households, Agricultural Programs, Family Farms, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Risk and Uncertainty, Q12, Q18,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205407&r=agr
  41. By: Tselepidakis, Elina
    Keywords: food safety, leafy greens, demand, food product recalls, risk perception, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205583&r=agr
  42. By: Cai, Yongxia; Beach, Robert H.
    Abstract: Maintaining and improving future food and energy security poses key challenges globally, especially in the face of climate change and climate mitigation. a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model -- the Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy model focusing on agriculture and land use (ADAGE-ALU), is used to examine how the global economy, especially energy, agriculture and land use, responds when facing these challenges. Despite continued increases in land productivity and energy efficiency in future decades, the effects of population and economic growth would dominate, leading to global increases in agricultural production, but also rising food and energy prices as well as continually growing GHG emissions in the BAU scenario. Comparing the climate change scenario with the BAU scenario, there are substantial reductions in global crop production and significant further increases in food prices, but little change in fossil fuel and biofuel production and energy prices, and only mild increases in CO2 emissions due to land-use changes. Relative to the BAU case, the implementation of a carbon tax on emissions other than those from land use change leads to the expansion of global biofuel production and a shift in the mix of crops produced towards those used as biofuels feedstocks, raises food prices, and reduces oil consumption and price slightly. Meanwhile, GHG emissions are slightly reduced as a result of lower oil consumption. In the REDD scenario, some cropland is afforested to store carbon, leading to a moderate rise in food and energy prices and significant GHG emission reductions. When climate change, REDD scenarios are implemented together, we see even higher reductions in global crop production and larger food price increases, along with greater reduction in GHG emissions compared with the CC scenario.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205717&r=agr
  43. By: Babcock, Bruice A.
    Keywords: TTIP, GIs, IPRs, Trade, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, International Relations/Trade, Political Economy,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:206446&r=agr
  44. By: Farnsworth, Derek; Moss, Charles B.
    Keywords: Agricultural policy, economic history, Agricultural and Food Policy, Political Economy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205895&r=agr
  45. By: Dharmasena, Senarath; Kapilakanchana, Montalee; Capps, Oral. Jr
    Keywords: organic and non-organic nonalcoholic beverages, censored demand, QUAIDS, semi-parametric methods, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, D11, D12,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205116&r=agr
  46. By: Jones, Heather
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205023&r=agr
  47. By: An, Henry; Qiu, Feng; Rude, James
    Keywords: Biofuels, renewable fuel standard, multivariate GARCH, price volatility spillover, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q16, Q18, Q42,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205672&r=agr
  48. By: Sisman, Muhammet Y.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206227&r=agr
  49. By: Anonymous; Wigier, Marek; Bułkowska, Małgorzata
    Abstract: The purpose of the study is to analyze the achievements and challenges facing the food sector and rural areas in selected European countries in ten years after the EU enlargement.
    Keywords: food sector, agricultural subsidies, sugar market, agri-food trade, rural development, human capital, rural areas, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepr:206064&r=agr
  50. By: Sizov, Andrey
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204980&r=agr
  51. By: Hafemeister, Jason
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, Political Economy,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204997&r=agr
  52. By: Rollins, Emily R.
    Abstract: This study asks the question: is the US using food safety regulations illegitimately, that is as a non-tariff barrier to trade rather than to manage food safety risks, specifically in the context of agri-food imports from Canada? Data on US import refusals of three categories of fruits, vegetables and nuts, cereal products, and seafood are used as a proxy for stringency and enforcement of US food safety regulations, with a negative binomial generalized linear model being employed to determine the significance of range of food safety risk and other less legitimate drivers of US food safety regulations. Key variables used to capture political influence on US food safety regulations are lobbying contributions, changes in import prices, and the occurrence of countervailing investigations. While US border rejections for these commodities are largely explained by food safety risks, there is evidence of political influence, with qualitative and quantitative difference across the commodities.
    Keywords: Food safety regulation, non-tariff barriers, protectionism, import refusals, agricultural trade, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Political Economy,
    Date: 2015–05–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205758&r=agr
  53. By: Francis, Mwaura; Miriam, Katunze; Tony, Muhumuza; Isaac, Shinyekwa
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural Finance, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Farm Management, Financial Economics, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2014–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eprcop:189410&r=agr
  54. By: Scheierling, Susanne M.; Treguer, David O.; Booker, James F.
    Abstract: Expectations are that the agricultural sector will have to expand the use of water for irrigation to meet rising food demand, given population and income growth. At the same time, the competition for water resources is growing in many regions. Increasing water productivity in agriculture is widely seen as a critical response to help address these challenges. Yet much of the public debate is vague on the meaning of agricultural water productivity—often emphasizing “more crop per drop” as if water were the only input that mattered—, and approaches for assessing and increasing water productivity are seldom addressed systematically. This paper discusses conceptual issues that should be kept in mind when assessing agricultural water productivity, and presents findings from what may be the first survey of the agricultural productivity and efficiency literature with regard to the explicit inclusion of water aspects in productivity and efficiency measurements. The survey includes studies applying single-factor productivity measures, total factor productivity indices, frontier models, and deductive models. A key finding is that most studies either incorporate field- and basin-level aspects but focus only on a single input (water), or they apply a multi-factor approach but do not tackle the basin-level aspects. It seems that no study on agricultural water productivity has yet presented an approach that accounts for multiple inputs and basin-level issues. However, deductive methods provide the flexibility to overcome some of the limitations of the other methods.
    Keywords: Agricultural water productivity, irrigation efficiency, single-factor productivity, total factor productivity, frontier models, deductive methods, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Productivity Analysis, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q15, Q25, D24,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205677&r=agr
  55. By: Baylis, Kathy; Mallory, Mindy; Songsermsawas, Tisorn
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, International Development,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205434&r=agr
  56. By: King, Lonnie
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205035&r=agr
  57. By: Houston, Kate
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205001&r=agr
  58. By: Dewaelheyns, Valerie; Lerouge, Frederik; Rogge, Elke; Vranken, Liesbet
    Abstract: The current attention for food production outside the traditional agricultural area concentrates on urban and community supported agriculture, but largely bypasses domestic gardens. Nonetheless, these multifunctional spaces offer interesting perspectives for food production. We developed a theoretical model to capture, quantify and interrelate the most relevant variables and constraints of potential food production in domestic gardens. As such, insight is gained in the food production potential in domestic gardens. Also the influence of utility on the household's decision on how much space and time to devote to food production was incorporated. The model development was fostered by quantitative and qualitative data collection for the case study Flanders. These data allowed to gain insights in the current food production and potential for food production in Flemish domestic gardens. The resulting model does not claim to be finalized, and future research could collect all necessary data to run the model. It does allow to explore the spatial and temporal constraints of individual domestic gardens for food production. This contributes to a better understanding of the adaptive capacity for food production of small-scale multifunctional spaces.
    Keywords: Multifunctional land use, domestic gardens, food production, economic modeling, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2014–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:kucawp:187602&r=agr
  59. By: Shang, Xia; Glynn, Tonsor
    Keywords: Beef Trade, Gravity Model, Food Safety, FSIS Recall, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162483&r=agr
  60. By: Useche, Pilar; Anglade, Boaz
    Abstract: Rice farmers in Peru are one of the world’s social groups that are more highly and heterogeneously exposed to climate change. While aggregate climate predictions provide important guidance for impact mitigation policy, actual climate perceptions and coping behavior observations provide a unique view into the heterogeneity of households’ exposure to climate risks and related livelihood stresses. In this study we show how farmer perceptions provide a nuanced picture of climate change in Northern Peru and analyze the different coping actions of agricultural households as they respond to diverse climatic stress factors. We examine the complexity of adaptation strategies by evaluating the complementarity/substitutability between different coping actions. For example, we find that households adopting new rice varieties as a coping strategy use this option as a substitute to getting credit, reducing the rice area or diversifying the crop. We also find that non-agricultural strategies such as migrating, mortgaging the land and pawning assets are high complements of asking for credit, reducing area or diversifying the crop, and relying on the help of family and friends.
    Keywords: Climate Change, Coping Strategies, Perceptions, Peru, Andes, Multivariate Probit, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205444&r=agr
  61. By: Huminston, Glenda
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204995&r=agr
  62. By: Woods, Timothy; Tropp, Debra
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–05–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205885&r=agr
  63. By: Mottaleb, Khandoker; Khanal, Aditya R.; Mishra, Ashok; Mohanty, Samrendu
    Abstract: More than half of the total extremely poor people in the world live in the major rice producing areas of Asia and Africa; rice is their staple. Enhancement of technical efficiency in producing rice in major rice producing countries of Asia and Africa can have tremendous positive impact on income of farm household, alleviate poverty and improve the livelihoods of millions in these countries. Using Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) data from Bangladesh and stochastic frontier production function estimation approach, we examine the technical efficiency of the rice farmers in Bangladesh. Further, we determine the factors that affect the level of efficiency at the farm level. Results indicate that while drought leads to a significant loss in rice production, floods is a major source of technical inefficiency in rice farming in Bangladesh. We also found that the extent of basic infrastructure can also affect rice production efficiency. Policies are suggested based on the empirical findings.
    Keywords: rice, efficiency, stochastic production function, farm household, drought, submergence, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty, Production Economics, Q12, D24,
    Date: 2014–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162543&r=agr
  64. By: Jang, Heesun; Du, Xiaodong
    Abstract: The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which provides financial incentives for landowners to idle erodible and marginal farmland, has contributed to a number of environmental benefits that otherwise would have not been achieved. However in the last few years CRP faced a number of new challenges as record-high crop prices significantly affected landowners’ interests to participate in the program. Despite an extensive literature on CRP, we lack evidence on how landowners react to changes in agricultural market conditions and CRP payment rates and hence how it affects the program enrollment and cost. In this paper, we attempt to investigate landowners’ incentives for CRP participation focusing on the linkage between farmers’ CRP payment bids and unobserved agricultural productivity. We develop and estimate an empirical structural model to examine the manner in which agricultural productivity, market conditions, and CRP payment affect landowners’ land use decisions. A novel identification strategy is employed to control for endogeneity and self-selection. The parameter estimates are used to simulate how changes in agricultural prices and CRP payment influence the program enrollment and cost.
    Keywords: Control function, Land allocation, payment premium, self-selection, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Industrial Organization, Land Economics/Use, Productivity Analysis, O13, Q15, Q24,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205727&r=agr
  65. By: Lim, Jinsoon; Kim, Sanghyo; Zulauf, Carl
    Keywords: Systemic Loss, Farm Loss, County Loss, Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205804&r=agr
  66. By: Drysdale, Krystal M.; Hendricks, Nathan P.
    Abstract: Depleting groundwater in regions of Kansas over the High Plains Aquifer have become areas of critical concern. Irrigators in Sheridan County, Kansas voted to impose restrictions on themselves by forming a Local Enhanced Management Area (LEMA) in an effort to self-regulate their water use. We estimate the short term production decision changes due to the collective action water use restriction whereby a difference-in-differences model and fixed effects regression. We compare differences between restricted irrigators to those located within five miles of the LEMA water restriction boundary. Our estimates indicate that the management plan was successful at reducing groundwater use and we find the greatest response to the water restriction policy at the intensive margin. This implies irrigators primarily responded by reducing the number of applied inches of water per acre; however, we also find that irrigators subject to the water use restriction responded by shrinking the total number of irrigated acres. In general, we find irrigators adjusted water use primarily by reducing irrigation intensity on corn or soybean, the main crops for this region, rather than switching to different crops.
    Keywords: irrigators, collective action, groundwater management, aquifer management, water policy, difference-in-differences, fixed effects, sustainable water policy, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015–05–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205521&r=agr
  67. By: Matthews, Alan
    Keywords: TTIP, IPRs, GIs, Trade, Protection, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, International Relations/Trade, Political Economy, Public Economics,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:206448&r=agr
  68. By: Chaudhry, Anita M.; Fairbanks, Dean H.K.; Caldwell, Alyssa
    Abstract: We estimate the effect of drought and opportunity to sell water to state-managed Drought Water Banks, on land fallowing patterns of rice farmers in three private surface water irrigation districts in Northern California. The analysis is based on 30 years (1984-2013) of spatial data derived from satellite data on fallowing decisions matched to highly detailed ownership data at the farm parcel level. We find that drought episodes, and the presence of a Drought Water Bank increase fallowed area and the likelihood to fallow. We examine the effect of each Drought Water Bank separately, finding significant differences among them. We also find that some water sale restrictions imposed by local or state authorities have significantly affected land fallowing. These findings have ramifications for water management in future California droughts.
    Keywords: Agricultural land use, water markets, droughts, California, spatial data, Environmental Economics and Policy, Q1, Q2,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205446&r=agr
  69. By: Sabasi, Darlington; Kompaniyets, Lyudmyla
    Abstract: This study examines industry-level impacts of possible credit constraints on farm profitability and productivity. We theoretically show that binding credit-constraints negatively affects profits as they inhibit acquisition of the optimal scale and mix of inputs for profit maximization. However, the impact of credit constraints on productivity is ambiguous and depends on the farm’s production region (IRS or DRS). Empirically, current debt-to-asset ratio has a positive effect on TFP and a negative effect on profit.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2015–05–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205689&r=agr
  70. By: Trindade, Federico J.
    Abstract: It is estimated that world population will increase by 30 percent to reach more than 9 billion people by 2050. Given expected higher income, per capita consumption of protein will induce an increase in cereal production of at least 70% over current levels; quantity attainable without incorporating new land if the yield growth rates increase at least 1.3% per year (Fulginiti and Perrin, 2010). The dramatic increase in world crop production observed in the second half of the nineteenth century was the result from increasing yields through the use of chemicals, fertilizers, pesticides and water from irrigation systems (Tilman et al., 2002). During the last years it was observed by several authors a decrease in global yields growth rates for the major crops (corn, wheat, rice and soybeans) when comparing the period 1990-2010 with 1960-1990 (Alston et al. 2010, Fuglie 2010, World Bank Development Report 2007). If this observed decline in agricultural productivity growth continues, average global yields growth rate for the main crops could fall below 1.3% increase per year, lower than the needed amount to reach the production goal of 2050. Thus, the food production increases needed to satisfy future demand will put greater stress on existing cropland and natural resources, if the prices rise there will be also greater pressure to convert natural ecosystems to cropland. Climate change, a final source of concern, is likely to aggravate the situation. Considering different scenarios of future trends in climate, several authors have found that the impact that climate change will have over agriculture production will most likely be negative (Schlenker and Roberts, 2009). Schlenker and Roberts consider the effect of weather on aggregate farm yields. They regressed corn, wheat and cotton yields in counties east of the 100º meridian on weather variables during the years 1950-2005 and found that there is an increasing positive relation between temperatures and crop yield up to 29-32ºC (depending on the crop.) Temperatures above these thresholds are found to reduce yields significantly. Their regressions included precipitation, time trend, soils, and county effects for location-specific unobserved factors. There are two important omissions in this study. First, they only consider rain-fed counties, those east of the 100º meridian, while production increases have been directly related to irrigation developments mostly west of the 100º. Second, their study controls for natural characteristics like precipitation but does not allow for purchased inputs. These inputs have had a pivotal role on increased yields and are under the control of the farmer. It is important then to understand the degree of substitution and the contribution of these versus other inputs to the time trends they estimated. An important step towards understanding the evolution of agricultural production under different climate scenarios is to carefully estimate the effect that different temperatures and precipitation have on agricultural productivity considering also inputs under farmers’ control and the farmers’ profit maximizing behavior. Another issue of importance, given the developments of the last 60 years, is the study of rain-fed as well as irrigated agriculture. These are the objectives of our analysis; we do not know of any other study with these objectives that considers this set of variables and assumptions. This research develops a county level biomass production function for an 800-mile climatic gradient from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River (41o N latitude). A panel data set that includes 101 counties for the 1960-2008 period is developed. The quantity of biomass produced per hectare (from all crops) is hypothesized to result from the use of traditional inputs under farmers’ control such as land, fertilizer, chemicals, and percent of irrigated land and from environmental variables such as soil organic matter, precipitation and temperatures. Indexes are constructed for all variables at the county level. Given interest on climate effects, particular emphasis is placed in the development of county precipitation and different intervals of degree-days indexes. A semi transcendental logarithmic production specification is jointly estimated with share equations for purchased inputs using a seemingly unrelated estimation approach. Additionally, to avoid simultaneity issues, price indexes are used as instruments for fertilizer and chemicals used. Out results are able to quantify the critical effects that high temperatures have on agricultural productivity in the region, after controlling for irrigation, other managed inputs, soil characteristics, precipitation, and technological change. Confirming Schlenker and Roberts (2009) results, we find a negative and increasing (nonlinear) effect of temperatures over 30ºC on crop yields; a full day of temperatures between 30ºC and 35ºC decreases expected yield by 1.0%, a day of temperatures over 35ºC decreases yields by 27.1%. Our results provide additional information than the findings of Schlenker and Roberts. The inclusion of irrigated land seems to diminish greatly the negative effect of higher temperatures; converting rain fed crops to irrigated crop will produce a sharp decrease in the negative impact of the higher temperature interval. Results also show that the semi-arid areas like western Nebraska and eastern Colorado and Wyoming, for example, compensate the lack of precipitation with high values of irrigation. Finally, the contribution of fertilizer and chemicals to yield changes is significant. Technological change has been fertilizer and chemicals using.
    Keywords: Climate impact, agricultural productivity, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205271&r=agr
  71. By: Schwarz, Jana; Mathijs, Erik; Maertens, Miet
    Abstract: International agri-food trade has expanded rapidly during the past decades and changed considerably in structure with important implications especially for developing economies. One of the main environmental concerns regarding international trade is about the exploitation and redistribution of water resources. In this paper we use the virtual water approach for analyzing the relation between global agri-food trade, its structure and virtual water flows in the period of 1986 to 2011. Specifically, for five world regions we calculate growth rates of interregional trade values and virtual water volumes, the contribution of different product groups to trade and the economic water efficiency of imports and exports. Our findings show that over time trade values have generally increased more rapidly than virtual water volumes. In Africa and South America virtual water exports have roughly quadrupled since 1986. In all regions staples and industrial products account for the largest share in virtual water trade. The recent shift towards high-value exports is beneficial for developing countries from a regional water efficiency perspective due to high trade values and low associated virtual water volumes. Water efficiency of trade has increased in all regions since 2000 and export water efficiency is especially high in Europe.
    Keywords: virtual water trade, food trade, international trade, environmental impact, economic development, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, F18, F64, Q17, Q27, Q56,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:kucawp:200308&r=agr
  72. By: Miller, John
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205027&r=agr
  73. By: Copeland, Alicia; Dharmasena, Senarath
    Abstract: Production and consumption of dairy alternative beverages in the United States has been on the rise as per capita consumption of fluid milk continues to fall. Almond milk and soymilk are the fastest growing categories in the U.S. dairy alternative marketplace. Using household-level purchase data from 2011 Nielsen Homescan panel and tobit econometric procedure, the conditional and unconditional own-price, cross-price and income elasticities for soymilk and almond milk will be estimated. Income, age, employment status, education level, race, ethnicity, region and presence of children are significant drivers affecting the demand for dairy alternative beverages, such as almond milk and soy milk. This paper investigates the growth of the dairy alternative beverage market in the United States and its implications for dairy farmer welfare.
    Keywords: Almond milk, soymilk, tobit model, Nielsen Homescan data, household level demand, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, D11, D12, P46,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205334&r=agr
  74. By: Vorotnikova, Ekaterina; Seale, James
    Abstract: The objective of this study is to investigate the dynamics of land allocation in China among the five top staple crops, corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, and cotton for the years 1988-2010. Specifically, for this timeframe we investigate how each crop’s relative price change affects the land share allocation of other staple crops. The study estimates the measure of sensitivity of crops’ acreages to their own and other crops price changes in pair-wise crop specific combinations. Background Currently 20% of the world’s population lives in China (Population Reference Bureau 2012). However, the nation’s arable farmland is only 7.8% that of the world’s (FAO 2012). Despite population growth and rising food demand in the past 30 years, total cultivable land in China has not expanded significantly (Ghatak and Seale 2001). In addition, there is a trend of decreased crop-specific growth rates in grains (Zhang 2003). In the meantime, some crops, for example, corn, have been expanding their land share in the same time period. There is a reason to believe that the expansion of land share for some crops may be happening at the expense of land share allocated to other crops. It is important to examine which crops and with what magnitude compete for the already scarce cultivable land in China. The dynamics of competition for scarce cultivatable land among different crops directly influence stability of prices in Chinese and world markets, availability of future crop supply, and grain trade. Data and Methods The unique dataset that only recently became available spans 24 years after the enactment of 1978-79 agricultural policies makes it possible to perform a meaningful econometric analysis. The study is possible because policy changes of 1978-1979 have allowed Chinese agriculture to move away from the government-driven commune system to a more market oriented one (Lin 1992). These changes allowed prices to adjust upwardly (Zhang 2003) and made the study of the behavior of farmers in response to market oriented conditions possible. Data used in this study span from the year 1985 to 2010 and are obtained from the China agricultural and economic database (ERS-USDA). The data set includes the national level prices in Yuan, quantities in kilograms, and acreage in hectares for each of the five crops. Based on the acreage data, land shares are also calculated. The modeling for the Chinese agricultural industry, specifically, for the top staple crops, is performed on a nationwide scale. To find the effects of relative price changes on land allocation amongst these crops in China, we use Rotterdam and Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) parameterizations of the differential model. The analysis applies the differential framework to a problem of land allocation driven by crops’ price changes from a production point of view utilizing a maximization set up. This study is distinct because the differential model allows us to establish a production model without controlling for technological changes occurring during the investigated period. Overall, the methodology allows us to assess crop-specific effects of relative price changes on farm land allocation amongst the top five strategic staple crops in China in the post agricultural reform period. Results Simple analysis indicates that since 1980, while total land expanded only by 3%, the land dedicated to the cultivation of wheat, rice, and cotton has decreased by 17%, 13%, and 6%, respectively. Land allocated to corn and soybeans has increased by 54% and 26%, respectively. In 2002, for the first time in Chinese history land acreage allocated to corn surpasses that of wheat, and more surprisingly in 2008 land acreage under corn has surpassed even that of rice. This is a significant shift given that in China historically rice consistently took up the largest acreage of cultivable land. The results of the differential model indicate that for an additional 1% increase in total land, corn, wheat, and soybeans acreages expanded by 2.04%, 1.17%, 0.91%, respectively, while that of rice actually contracts by 1.44%. These results are significant at the 1% level. The following crops compete for already existing arable land: rice and cotton as well as soybeans and cotton. Soybean and wheat as well as wheat and cotton behave as compliments. Discussion The findings in this study have significance for consumers, producers, and policy makers because the dynamics of competition for land among these staple crops directly influences stability of world prices, availability of future grain supplies, and grain trade. The results offer an interesting suggestive picture as to how grains’ trade may look like for China going forward.
    Keywords: agricultural land allocation in China, differential model, Rotterdam, price responsiveness, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2014–02–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162539&r=agr
  75. By: Smale, Melinda; Mathenge, Mary K.; Opiyo, Joseph
    Abstract: We use panel data from a sample of smallholder farmers in Kenya to test how the effects of nonfarm earnings on demand for fertilizer vary across different crops, namely: a major food staple (maize), an emerging cash crop (vegetables), and a traditional export crop (tea). We find that, holding other factors constant, nonfarm earnings from either business or salaried work detract from fertilizer application rates on maize and vegetables. While nonfarm salaried earnings appear to have no effect, business income positively affects fertilizer use and application rates on tea. Results suggest competition for household resources between farm and nonfarm sectors among growers of Kenya’s main staple and emerging cash crops, but possible complementarity among tea growers, who farm a traditional perennial export crop with longer planning horizons.
    Keywords: nonfarm income, fertilizer, maize, cash crops, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development,
    Date: 2015–08–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:egtewp:206441&r=agr
  76. By: Velasco, Ryan
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Political Economy, Production Economics,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205063&r=agr
  77. By: Winchester, Niven; Reilly, John M.
    Abstract: What will large-scale global bioenergy production look like? We investigate this question by developing a detailed representation of bioenergy in a global economy-wide model. We develop a scenario with a global carbon dioxide price, applied to all anthropogenic emissions except those from land-use change, that rises from $15 per metric ton in 2015 to $59 in 2050. This creates market conditions favorable to biomass energy, resulting in global non-traditional bioenergy production of ~150 exajoules (EJ) in 2050. By comparison, in 2010 global energy production was primarily from coal (139 EJ), oil (175 EJ) and gas (108 EJ). With this policy, 2050 emissions are 16% less in our Base Policy case than our Reference case, although extending the scope of the carbon price to include emissions from land-use change would reduce 2050 emissions by 57% relative to the same baseline. Our results from various policy scenarios show that lignocellulosic (LC) ethanol may become the major form of bioenergy, if its production costs fall by amounts predicted in a recent survey and ethanol blending constraints disappear by 2030; however, if its costs remain higher than expected or the ethanol blend wall continues to bind, bioelectricity and bioheat may prevail. Higher LC ethanol costs may also result in expanded production of first-generation biofuels (ethanol from sugarcane and corn) so that they remain in the fuel mix through 2050. Deforestation occurs if emissions from landuse change are not priced, although the availability of biomass residues and improvements in crop yields and conversion efficiencies mitigate pressure on land markets. As regions are linked via international agricultural markets, irrespective of the location of bioenergy production, natural forest decreases are largest in regions with the lowest political constraints to deforestation. The combination of carbon price and bioenergy production increases food prices by 2.6%–4.7%, with bioenergy accounting for 1.3%–2.6%.
    Keywords: Bioenergy, climate policy, land-use change, greenhouse gas emissions, Environmental Economics and Policy, Q24, Q42, Q54,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205106&r=agr
  78. By: Li, Xiaogu; Jensen, Kimberly L.; Clark, Christopher D.; Lambert, Dayton M.
    Abstract: Consumers in the United States spend a large portion of their household food expenditure on beef, as some of them are willing to pay premium for beef products presented with high quality attributes, both taste and non-taste related. This study examines U.S. beef consumer preferences and willingness to pay for non-taste, "extrinsic" attributes that exhibit public benefits, and how they are affected by individual taste and scale heterogeneity. Effects of consumers' beliefs in the consequential effects of their beef choices are also investigated. Results may further understanding of U.S. consumers' perception and acceptance of extrinsic attributes in beef products and public issues such as food safety, climate change and animal welfare.
    Keywords: beef, extrinsic attributes, public goods, scale heterogeneity, consequentiality, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Q13, Q18, Q56,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:204908&r=agr
  79. By: Chen, Xuqi; Gao, Zhifeng; Swisher, Marilyn; House, Lisa A.
    Abstract: Concerns about environmental degeneration due to excessive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides have grown as farmers have increased reliance on these chemicals to maintain or increase crop yields. Although there are a variety of governmental programs that encourage farmers to adopt practices using less fertilizers and pesticides, many growers continue using conventional production methods in part because the economic benefits of using more environmentally sensitive techniques remains unproven or elusive for farmers. Exploring consumer willingness to pay (WTP) for fresh produce carrying labels describing various environmental benefits is one important aspect in assessing the potential that growers will adopt environmentally sound production techniques. Given that sustainable production practices may have different environmental benefits, differentiating consumer WTP for specific benefits may provide critical information for developing more effective labels and help growers more appropriately label products produced with environmental friendly techniques.
    Keywords: Willingness to pay, Eco-label, Fresh produce, Environmentally friendly, Agribusiness, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Marketing,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205655&r=agr
  80. By: Rosalind, James
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205061&r=agr
  81. By: Heng, Yan
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162488&r=agr
  82. By: Fu, Shengfei; Klepacka, Anna M.; Florkowski, Wojciech J.
    Abstract: Milk products are a preeminent food category in Poland, providing both employment and dietary benefit. This paper investigates factors affecting household milk consumption in Poland, paying attention to the effect of outmigration. Bivariate two-part model analyzes actual milk spending and allows the dependence of whole and low-fat milk consumption decisions.
    Keywords: diary product, milk consumption, whole milk, low fat milk, Polish household, Poland, depopulation, outmigration, nutrition, dietary welfare, bivariate two-part model, Heckman selection model, heterogeneity, heteroskedasticity, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162448&r=agr
  83. By: Kim, Taehoo; Kim, Man-Keun
    Abstract: This study examines the existence of moral hazard inherent in the choices of prevented planting (PP) and late planting (LP). The PP provision is defined as the “failure to plant an insured crop by the final planting date due to adverse events” such as excess moisture or drought. If the farmer decides not to plant the crop, (after appraised by an agency) the farmer receives a PP indemnity. LP is an option for the farmer to plant the crop and still maintain the crop insurance when the farmer fails to plant crop by the final planting date. However, by choosing LP option, the farmer has to lower the insurance coverage level depending on the LP date due to potential yield loss. Crop insurance may alter farmers’ decision choices in production in making the selection of PP or LP. In other words, crop insurance can increase the likelihood of PP claims even though farmers can choose LP. In particular, this paper seeks to find evidence that the farmer with higher insurance coverage would tend to choose PP statistically more often. In this case moral hazard would then be observed.
    Keywords: Crop Insurance, Moral hazard, Prevented Planting, Late Planting, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty, D81, G22, Q12, Q14,
    Date: 2015–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205117&r=agr
  84. By: Dharmasena, Senarath; Murano, Peter
    Keywords: Greek-style yogurt, national school lunch program, choice architecture, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, D03, C93,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205114&r=agr
  85. By: Lehman, Dave
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, Political Economy, Public Economics,
    Date: 2015–02–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:204991&r=agr
  86. By: Ridley, William; Devadoss, Stephen
    Keywords: Argentina, soybeans, soymeal, soyoil, cattle, beef, export tariffs, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, D58, F13, F14, Q17,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205421&r=agr
  87. By: Cowley, Cortney; Brorsen, B. Wade
    Abstract: The USDA recently included anaerobic digesters as one of 10 building blocks in a plan to reduce net carbon dioxide emissions by over 120 million metric tons by 2025. If 500 new anaerobic digesters are to be deployed on farms over the next 10 years, then a better and broader understanding of anaerobic digester economic feasibility is needed. This study uses econometric methods to estimate production and cost functions for anaerobic digesters based on a nationwide survey and then determines net present value (NPV) using the estimated functions. Farm size, digester inputs, and digester design parameters and construction materials could have a significant effect on the productivity and profitability of an anaerobic digester. Economies of size were evident for plug flow and complete mix anaerobic digesters, which were more economically feasible on dairy farms than on swine operations. On dairy farms, economic feasibility could be achieved with co-product marketing, but swine farms required government support to achieve positive NPVs.
    Keywords: anaerobic digestion, production function, cost function, dairy, swine, animal feeding operations, economies of size, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, D24, Q16, Q42,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205667&r=agr
  88. By: Louhichi, Kamel; Ciaian, Pavel; Espinosa, Maria; Colen, Liesbeth; Perni, Angel; Gomez y Paloma, Sergio
    Abstract: This paper presents the first EU-wide individual farm-level model (IFM-CAP) intending to assess the impacts of CAP towards 2020 on farm economic and environmental performances across Europe. IFM-CAP is a static positive programming model applied to each EU-FADN individual farm -around 60500 farms- to guarantee the highest representativeness of the EU agricultural sector and to capture the full heterogeneity across EU farms in terms of policy representation and impacts. The model is used to assess the effects of the crop diversification measure, given that it is one of the most challenging aspects of the EU greening policy in terms of modelling and because of the farm-specificity of its implementation and impact. Results show that most non-compliant farms (80 %) chose to reduce their level of non-compliance following the introduction of the diversification measure owing to the sizable subsidy reduction imposed in case of non-compliance. However, the overall impact on farm income is rather limited: farm income decreases by less than 1 % at EU level, and only 5 % of the farm population will be negatively affected. Nevertheless, for a small number of farms, the income effect could be more substantial (more than –10 %).
    Keywords: Common Agricultural Policy, Greening, Crop Diversification, Farm-level Model, Positive Programming Model, EU, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, C55, Q12, Q18,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205309&r=agr
  89. By: Heboyan, Vahe; Hovhannisyan, Vardges
    Keywords: Elasticity of demand for cigarettes, quantile regression, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, D11, I12,
    Date: 2015–05–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206465&r=agr
  90. By: Cordonnier, Michael
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2015–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:205037&r=agr
  91. By: Hoang, Hoa K.; Meyers, William H.
    Abstract: Studies have shown that income distribution effects and urbanization are crucial for providing more precise long-term food demand projections, especially in rapid-growing economies like Vietnam. Using a fitted QUAIDS model, this study projects at-home food demand of Vietnamese households to 2020 and 2030, taking into account alternative growth rates in food expenditures, food prices and urbanization. Food consumed in a household is divided into 7 major groups including rice, pork, meat and fish, vegetables and fruits, sugar, drinks, and miscellaneous food. Results showed that the responsiveness of demand for foods varies across income classes and between urban and rural areas, most notably in the case of rice. Projections under alternative scenarios also showed that the budget shares of rice decline significantly while those for meat and fish, drinks and most remarkably, miscellaneous food group, increase at higher levels of food expenditures. Interestingly, the effect of urbanization is more remarkable for rice while it is quite modest for the remaining food groups.
    Keywords: QUAIDS, demand analysis, food consumption, household analysis, Vietnam, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205692&r=agr
  92. By: Bonroy, Olivier; Garapin, Alexis; Hamilton, Stephen F.; Souza Monteiro, Diogo M.
    Keywords: label, public policy, collective action game, experimental economics, agricultural economics., Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Industrial Organization, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Risk and Uncertainty, C72, C92, Q18,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205482&r=agr
  93. By: Harris, J. Michael; Williams, Robert P.; Mishra, Ashok K.
    Abstract: The role of gender in agriculture has gained considerable attention among policymakers and researchers. According to the 2013 Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) women served as the principal operator on almost 11 percent of U.S. farms and as a second or third operator on more than 40 percent of farms. Given the importance of women operators in productive agriculture the objective of this report will be to assess the impact of gender on net farm income, total farm output, farming efficiency, production costs, and total household income in the United States. We apply the average treatment approach (ATE) to analyze the impact of operator gender on the income and performance of U.S. farms.
    Keywords: impact of gender, net farm income, total farm output, farming efficiency, production costs, total household income, Average treatment effect (ATE), Agribusiness, Agricultural Finance, Financial Economics, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205780&r=agr
  94. By: Vickner, Steven S.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:206717&r=agr
  95. By: Wibowo, Rulianda P.; Featherstone, Allen M.
    Abstract: The corn farmer has benefited from high corn price. However, the corn price plunged from its high price in 2012 to as low as $ 4.46 per bushel in 2013. The drop in corn price and intense competition from the global grain markets make farms that are non-efficient struggle economically. Pure technical, overall technical, and scale efficiency were measured to analyze the competitiveness of a sample of Kansas corn farmers. The average of pure technical, overall technical, and scale efficiency for irrigated farm, non-irrigated conventional farm and non-irrigated non-tillage farm are below 70%. Farmers increased their efficiency during drought in 2012 and lower corn price. Government payments and insurance expenditure were found to be negatively correlated with efficiency. Farmers should focus on utilizing land and labor more efficiently rather than expanding their size.
    Keywords: Nonparametric efficiency, irrigated corn, non-irrigated corn, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Production Economics,
    Date: 2015–07–26
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205679&r=agr
  96. By: Sung, Jae-hoon; Miranowski, John A.
    Abstract: We analyze the eects of climate conditions and crop insurance on farm-level land allocation decisions among corn, soybeans, winter wheat, and hay in 10 Midwest states. Based on ARMS data, we estimate farmers' land allocation equations that control for market conditions, climate and soil variables, and insurance. A multivariate sample selection model is used for estimation. We nd that: 1) benecial heat has positive eects on corn and soybean acreage but negative eects on winter wheat acreage, 2) excessive heat has negative eects on corn and winter wheat acreage but have positive eects on soybean acreage, 3) an increase in precipitation by 1% increases corn acreage by 0.6% but decrease soybean and winter wheat acreage by 1.0% and 1.6%, 4) soybean acreage is more sensitive to summer drought, and 5) crop insurance alters farmers land allocation.
    Keywords: Cropping pattern, climate change, crop insurance, ARMS., Land Economics/Use, Q54, Q18, Q15, Q12.,
    Date: 2015–07–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205787&r=agr
  97. By: Zhao, Xin; Brady, Michael P.; Tozer, Peter R.
    Abstract: Most fruit growers in Central Washington that produce apples or cherries typically grow both. This is interesting given that important sources of complementarities which generate economies of scope, such as crop rotations, that motivate crop diversification throughout agriculture are not present. An alternative explanation is risk mitigation because apple and cherry yields and prices are somewhat uncorrelated. In this paper we attempt to evaluate the relative importance of economies of scope versus risk in motivating orchard crop diversification while accounting for economies of scale. To date, the literature on perennial crop supply response has not considered diversification and thus may be missing an important factor that determines farm level land allocation decisions which influence aggregate supply response.
    Keywords: Acreage, Crop Diversification, Economies of Scope, Orchard Crop, Risk, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Risk and Uncertainty, Q12, Q15,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205663&r=agr
  98. By: Sichoongwe, Kiru
    Abstract: Agriculture is an important sector of Zambia’s economy, serving as the main source of income for the rural population. Its production is mainly dependent on rain-fed hoe cultivation and maize remains an important staple food crop. In order to improve food security, generate income and minimize risks associated with heavy dependence on maize, the government of Zambia has been promoting crop diversification. This study was carried out with the objectives of : i) to determine the extent of crop diversification, ii) to compare the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of diversifiers and non-diversifiers, and iii) to identify the major determinants that influence farmer’s decisions to diversify in crop production. The Crop diversification index (CDI) was used to measure the extent of diversification while the Tobit model was used to analyze the determinants of diversification. Bivariate statistical analysis and mean comparisons were used to compare socio-economic characteristics of diversifiers against their non-diversifying counterparts. The extent of crop diversification among the smallholder farmers was relatively low since the majority of the diversifiers had a lower CDI value; 42.35% had a CDI greater than zero but less than or equal to 0.49; 5.87% had a CDI equal to 0.5 and 20.78% had a CDI greater than 0.5. On the other hand, the non-diversifiers constituted 31% of the total sample. The size of landholding, quantities of fertilizer, distance to the market, tillage time and tillage (using a plough) were found to significantly determine crop diversification.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Production Economics,
    Date: 2014–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:cmpart:198521&r=agr
  99. By: Kuethe, Todd H.; Paulson, Nicholas; Schnitkey, Gary
    Abstract: By design, crop insurance is well suited to cover temporary or short-term adverse financial conditions for America’s farms. Farmers purchase crop insurance annually to cover losses as a result of either adverse growing conditions or price declines. This study examines the degree to which crop insurance may support farmers’ ability to meet long-term financial obligations. We explore the link between crop insurance coverage and farm solvency using a panel of farm records from 1995 – 2014.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015–05–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205662&r=agr
  100. By: Ma, Wanglin; Abdulai, Awudu
    Abstract: This study investigates the determinants of marketing contract choices and the related impact on farm net returns of apple farmers in China. We employ a two-stage selection correction approach (BFG) for the multinomial logit model. On the basis of the BFG estimation, we also use an endogenous switching regression model and a propensity score matching technique to estimate the causal effects of marketing contract choices on net returns. The empirical results reveal that written contracts increase apple Farmers’ net returns,while oral contracts exert an opposite impact.
    Keywords: Marketing Contracts, Multinomial Logit, Selectivity Correction, China, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Marketing, C52, Q13,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:202719&r=agr
  101. By: Helfand, Steven M.; Magalhaes, Marcelo M.; Rada, Nicholas E.
    Abstract: The role of farm size has recently come to the forefront of agricultural development debates. Agricultural development policy often focuses on small farms given evidence of their role in poverty reduction and of higher yields. Yet policy has also focused on large farms due to their share of output, efficiency gains from vertical and horizontal integration, and potential employment generation. Brazil offers an interesting case study because of its wide spectrum of farm sizes and the country’s dual agricultural policy focus towards large commercial “agribusiness” enterprises, led by the Ministry of Agriculture, and “family farms,” led by the Ministry of Agrarian Development. Our purpose is to examine the role that farm size may have in Brazil’s agricultural total factor productivity (TFP) growth, which has accelerated at one of the world’s fastest rates over the last twenty years. The data are drawn from the agricultural censuses of 1985, 1995/96, and 2006, aggregated at the municipality level into five farm-size classes. The findings of this study point to heavy technical efficiency losses across all size classes, creating a substantial drag on national agricultural TFP growth. Moreover, because farms in the middle of the size distribution achieved the slowest technical change and TFP growth – bookended by faster growth in the smallest and largest farm-size classes – we identify an unexpected and unexplored source of inefficiency, namely medium-sized farms.
    Keywords: agriculture, Brazil, efficiency change, farm size, technical change, total factor productivity (TFP), Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:204875&r=agr
  102. By: Paustian, Margit; Wellner, Marie; Theuvsen, Ludwig
    Abstract: Management requirements for crop farming are high and will rise in the future. Arable farms are challenged by volatile markets, growing administrative burdens, increasing operating costs and growing competition for land. Management skills have become much more important for farmers in recent years and this trend will continue in the future. There are numerous instruments like accounting software or crop field cards integrated in daily management practice, but there is a deficiency of a fully integrated management system to give an overview of all areas of the farming business. This gap can be closed by the management tool Balanced Scorecard (BSC) that provides an overview of all production and management activities on a farm. Therefore, with the aim to trans-fer the BSC concept to crop farming, German farmers and agricultural advisors were surveyed to get insights into the success factors and key performance indicators in the four BSC perspectives they consider most rele-vant for the operational success of arable farms. By the use of a cluster analysis, three different farm types were identified according to their visions and strategies. For the three farm types the key performance indica-tors that the respondents considered most relevant for farm performance were figured out. Implementation of the BSC to crop farming can result in a big benefit for management practice. The BSC focuses vision and long-term strategy with the main goal to ensure consistency of the farm and increase farm performance.
    Keywords: Balanced Scorecard, performance measurement, cluster analysis, crop farming, Agribusiness,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iefi15:206237&r=agr
  103. By: Gorton, Matthew; Török, Aron; Tregear, Angela
    Keywords: TTIP, GIs, IPRs, Trade, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Industrial Organization, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, International Relations/Trade, Political Economy, Public Economics,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:206454&r=agr
  104. By: Xia, Tian; Li, Xianghong
    Keywords: food retailing, manufacturers, national brands, private labels, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Industrial Organization,
    Date: 2015–05–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205873&r=agr
  105. By: Sapkota, Pratikshya; Gallardo, Karina; McCluskey, Jill; Rickard, Bradley
    Keywords: Patent Licensing, Apple, Commercialization, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205420&r=agr
  106. By: Hao, Na; Colson, Greg; Wetzstein, Michael
    Abstract: U.S. ethanol expansion objectives are to improve both energy security and the environmental. However, this expansion has raised issues concerning its detrimental impacts on the price volatility of developing countries’ agricultural commodities. These concerns are addressed by empirically investigating the relations among U.S. ethanol and corn markets with developing countries’ corn prices. Results indicate that U.S. ethanol demand impacts on developing countries’ corn prices vary by country. Further, results reveal that the transmission effects of U.S. ethanol shocks are systematically stronger for countries with higher food import dependency and U.S. food aid.
    Keywords: Ethanol, Food security, Panel structural vector autoregression, World hunger, Food aid, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Security and Poverty, International Relations/Trade, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205580&r=agr
  107. By: Russell, Levi A.; Briggeman, Brian C.
    Keywords: agricultural finance, cooperatives, capital structure, Agribusiness, Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty, Q13, Q14,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162477&r=agr
  108. By: Mattas, Konstadinos; Tsakiridou, Efthimia; Theodoridou, Glykeria
    Keywords: GIs, Consumer Behaviour, TTIP, IPRs, Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:206462&r=agr
  109. By: Capitani, Daniel H.D.; Mattos, Fabio
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205565&r=agr
  110. By: Han, Yicheol; Goetz, Stephan J.
    Abstract: Agriculture has for the most part successfully met the food and material needs of people and industries. Generally, industries develop in rapid bursts that follow from economic innovations, instead of developing at a gradual and continuous pace. The development of agriculture is also closely linked to technological innovations and conditions elsewhere in the economy. However, few if any previous studies have examined how agriculture has reorganized in terms of industry input-output relationships. In this poster, We examine when and how agriculture has undergone changes within the US, through a comparative analysis of agricultural activities as reflected in input output tables over time.
    Keywords: Input-output accounts, Agriculture, Reorganization, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205537&r=agr
  111. By: Medwid, Laura J.; Signore, Alicia M.; Lambert, Dayton M.; Clark, Christopher D.; Vossler, Christian A.; Walker, Forbes R.; Hawkins, Shawn A.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205051&r=agr
  112. By: Charlton, Diane; Taylor, J. Edward
    Abstract: Economic theory shows that education is critical to economic development and to labor sector choice, yet there is little research to indicate the role school access plays in the agricultural transformation, the stage of development when the labor force shifts from primarily agriculture to non-agriculture. This paper identifies the impact of secondary school access on the probability of working in agriculture using 31 years of household panel data nationally representative of rural Mexico. The findings show that local secondary school access reduces the probability of working in agriculture at age 20 by 6.2 percentage points and the impacts grow as individuals age. The theoretical model shows that instrumenting for education using changes in school supply leads to inflated coefficient estimates when there are heterogeneous returns to education across labor sectors. This is consistent with the empirical literature, which typically finds greater returns to education using instrumental variables compared to OLS. Nevertheless, estimating the reduced form impacts of school supply on labor decisions has important implications for policy makers. The findings in this paper show that increased rural education is a significant contributor to the agricultural transformation, which leads to higher incomes in both the farm and non-farm sectors.
    Keywords: agricultural transformation, education, development, Mexico, farm labor supply, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Labor and Human Capital,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205781&r=agr
  113. By: Guerrero-Escobar, Santiago; Hernandez-Del Valle, Gerardo; Juarez-Torres, Miriam
    Abstract: In this paper we extend the traditional ARCH(1) model by including a functional trend term in the conditional volatility of a time series. We derive the main properties of the model and apply it to all agricultural commodities in the Mexican CPI basket for three different time periods that implied changes in price regulations an behavior: pre-NAFTA (1987-1993), post-NAFTA (1994-2005)and commodity supercycle (2006-2014). The proposed model seems to adequately fit the volatility process and also outperforms, in the short run, the ARCH(1) and GARCH(1,1) models, some of the most popular approaches used in the literature to analyze price volatility. Our results show that, consistent with anecdotal evidence, price volatility trends of fruits and vegetables increased from the period 1987-1993 to 1994-2005, whereas they decreased for livestock products. From 1994-2005 to 2006-2014, fruits and vegetable trends decreased, whereas they increased for livestock products. Additionally, we identify some agricultural products that, due to their increasing price volatility trends, may present a risk for food inflation in the short run.
    Keywords: increasing volatility, trend, ARCH model, agricultural and livestock prices in Mexico, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Q31 C22,
    Date: 2015–07–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205738&r=agr
  114. By: Etienne, Xiaoli L.; Hoffman, Linwood A.
    Abstract: In this paper, we evaluate the spatial nature of the price discovery process in regional distiller’s grain markets in the US and the price relationships among distiller’s grains, corn, and soybean meals since the beginning of the biofuel boom. We use multivariate and pairwise cointegration analyses to examine spatial integrations among regions and to investigate whether a stable long-term price relationship exists in the market. Error correction models are estimated to determine the speed of price adjustment to the long-run spatial equilibrium in the distiller’s grain market. Furthermore, Directed Acyclic Graphs are used to determine the contemporaneous causal patterns of prices observed at different regions. We also conduct cointegration analyses to investigate the long-run relationships between corn, soybean meal, and distiller’s grain prices. Overall, results suggest that with a few exceptions, the distiller’s grain market in the US market is well-integrated for the ten locations considered. It also appears that while there appears to be no long-run relationship between corn, soybean meal, and distiller’s grain prices prior to 2007, a much stronger link between them has been established since then, in parallel with the expansion of ethanol production and the maturity of DDGS markets.
    Keywords: distiller’s grain, DDGS, spatial price relationship, corn, soybean meal, biofuel, cointegration analyses, market integration, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing, Risk and Uncertainty, Q11, Q14, O13, C5, C00,
    Date: 2015–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:205125&r=agr
  115. By: Wree, Philipp; Sauer, Johannes
    Abstract: High Yield Genetically Modified Wheat (HOSUT) HOSUT lines are an innovation in wheat breeding based on genetic modification (GM) with an incremental yield potential of ca. 28 % compared to conventional wheat varieties. We apply the real option concept of Maximum Incremental Social Tolerable Irreversible Costs (MISTICs) to do an ex-ante assessment of the socioeconomic potential of HOSUT lines for Germany. We analyze the cost and benefits to farmer and society within two scenarios. Our results indicate that not authorizing HOSUT lines is correct if German society values the possible total irreversible costs of this technology to be € 10.44 and € 12.15 per citizen or more, depending on the scenario.
    Keywords: Real option, wheat, yield increasing, uncertainty, irreversibility, social costs, GMO, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Food Security and Poverty, Land Economics/Use, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:204846&r=agr
  116. By: Lloyd, Tim; McCorriston, Steve; Morgan, Wyn; Zvogu, Evious
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204301&r=agr
  117. By: Herbst, Brian K.; Anderson, David P.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Richardson, James W.; Mazurkiewicz, Stephanie
    Abstract: Dairymen have been searching for alternative methods to protect their margins against risk. The Dairy Security Act proposes to provide margin protection for dairies for the Farm Bill. This study showed the DSA provides protection but it is not consistent across all regions and sizes of dairies.
    Keywords: Dairy, Margin, Farm Bill, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea14:162537&r=agr
  118. By: Tandon, Sharad
    Keywords: World Food Price Crisis, India, Food Security, Food Security and Poverty, International Development, D12, I25, J24, O12, O53,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea15:204911&r=agr

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