nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2015‒05‒22
sixty papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Cautious or misguided? Vietnam’s rice policies By Vanzetti, David; Pham, Dung
  2. How to assess agricultural water productivity?: looking for water in the agricultural productivity and efficiency literature By Scheierling, S. M.
  3. Loss in Forest Resource Values Due to Agricultural Land Conversion in Brazil By Ronaldo Serôa da Motta; Peter Herman May
  4. Heterogeneous Economic and Behavioural Drivers of the Farm Afforestation Decision By Ryan, Mary; O'Donoghue, Cathal; Upton, Vincent; Handgraaf, Michael
  5. Demand for Diverse Diets: Evidence from Nigeria By Akerele, Dare; Odeiyi, Kehinde
  6. Regulatory Capture and Support for and Opposition to Controversial Food System Policy Issues: An Exploratory Analysis By Kolodinsky, Jane; Reynolds, Travis; Baker, Daniel; Watts, Richard
  7. Promoting productive gendered spaces for adapting to climatic stress: two case studies from rural Bangladesh By International Water Management Institute (IWMI).
  8. Potato food waste in Swiss households - quantity, driving factors and waste behavior of consumers By Willersinn, Christian; Mack, Gabriele; Siegrist, Michael; Mouron, Patrik
  9. You always take the weather with you: The role of climate in determining agricultural land prices By Allan, Corey; Kerr, Suzi
  10. The value of ethical concern - Willingness to pay for animal welfare, local origin and organic production By Hasselbach, Johanna Lena; Rungie, Cam; Roosen, Jutta
  11. Women\u2019s vulnerability to climatic and non-climatic change in the eastern Gangetic Plains By International Water Management Institute (IWMI).
  12. Plant genetic engineering, climate change and food security By Ortiz, R.
  13. The treatment of don't know responses in the consumers' perceptions: a survey in the agri-food sector By Iannario, Maria; Manisera, Marica; Zuccolotto, Paola
  14. Impacts of a second generation biofuel policy on regional economy and carbon emission reduction: the case of Jatropha diodiesel in China By Wang, Zanxin
  15. A Cost-benefit Analysis of Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon By Lykke E. Andersen
  16. Attitudes towards honey among Italian consumers: a choice experiment approach By Cosmina, Marta; Gallenti, Gianluigi; Marangon, Francesco; Troiano, Stefania
  17. Who Disagrees with Scientists? Public beliefs about the Safety of Genetically Modified Food and Human Involvement in Global Warming By McFadden, Brandon R.; Lusk, Jayson L.
  18. Patterns in Local Circular Food Chain Models, Nordic Hungary By Miklós, Ilona
  19. Perceived Consumer Value towards new farmed fish species: A psychographic segmentation in top-five EU markets By Anonymous
  20. Managing water and fertilizer for sustainable agricultural intensification By Drechsel, Pay; Heffer, P.; Magen, H.; Mikkelsen, R.; Wichelns, D.
  21. How Much Do Consumers Value PDO Certifications? Estimates of WTP for PDO Dry-Cured Ham in Italy By Garavaglia, Christian; Mariani, Paolo
  22. The Direct Impact of Risk Management Tools on Farm Income: The Case of Irelands Spring Barley Producers By Loughrey, Jason; Thorne, Fiona; Hennessy, Thia
  23. THE DETERMINANTS OF URBAN FOOD SECURITY: INSIGHTS FROM A LOW INCOME NEIGHBORHOOD IN SOUTH AFRICA By Wynand Carel Johannes Grobler
  24. On Smallholder Farmers' Exposure to Risk and Adaptation Mechanisms: Panel Data Evidence from Ethiopia By Ayenew, Habtamu Yesigat; Sauer, Johannes; Abate-Kassa, Getachew
  25. Traditional Terms and Appellation Wines Debates in Sight of TTIP Negotiation By Gaeta, Davide; Corsinovi, Paola
  26. Is dilution the solution for water pollution? An economic analysis By Paragahawewa, Upananda H.; Doole, Graeme J.; Bower, Bob
  27. Preferences identification of consumers of snacks through the analysis of the frequencies of the sensory dominance By Piccoli, Bruno; Recchia, Annamaria; Zoboli, Gian Paolo; Dinnella, Caterina
  28. Changes in Production Practices, Trade, and Quality Assessment of Protected Designation of Origin Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese From XIX To XXI Century By Zannoni, Mario
  29. Consumer attitudes towards attributes of food and the use of digital media and smart technologies to inform and purchase food By Sanders, C.M.; Guenther, M.; Tait, P.R.; Daziel, P.C.
  30. Exploring strategic priorities for regional agricultural research and development investments in Southern Africa By Johnson, M.
  31. Can providing a morning healthy snack help to reduce hunger during school time? Experimental evidence from an elementary school in Connecticut By Castellari, Elena; Berning, Joshua
  32. Nudges, Social Norms and Permanence in Agri-Environmental Schemes By Kuhfuss, L.; Preget, R.; Thoyer, S.; Hanley, N.; Le Coent, P.; Desole, M.
  33. Boosting household irrigation in Ethiopia By International Water Management Institute (IWMI)
  34. Extent of arsenic contamination and its impact on the food chain and human health in the eastern Ganges Basin: a review By Natarajan, Rajmohan
  35. Farmers' Markets and Farm Shops in Germany: is the motivation to buy there the same? By Irz, Xavier; Leroy, Pascal; Réquillart, Vincent; Solerb, Louis-Georges
  36. Exploring the role of farmers’ attitudes in influencing animal health best practice By Dillon, Emma Jane; Hennessy, Thia; Howley, Peter; Heanue, Kevin
  37. The value of direct farmers-consumers relationships as determinants of consumers' purchase choices By Corsi, Alessandro; Novelli, Silvia
  38. You are what (and where) you eat : capturing food away from home in welfare measures By Farfan,Gabriela; Genoni,Maria Eugenia; Vakis,Renos
  39. Advancing the water-energy-food nexus: social networks and institutional interplay in the Blue Nile By Stein, C.; Barron, J.; Nigussie, L.; Gedif, B.; Amsalu, T.; Langan, Simon
  40. Ecosystem services and resilience framework By CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE).
  41. The direct effect of climate change on the cereal production in Tunisia: A micro-spatial analysis. By Zouabi, Oussama; Kahia, Montassar
  42. Gender strategy By CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE).
  43. Water management in the Noyyal River basin: a situation analysis By Srinivasan, V.
  44. Review paper on \u2018Garden Kits\u2019 in Africa: lessons learned and the potential of improved water management By Merrey, D. J.
  45. A Simple Recipe: Estimating the Effect of a Prenatal Nutrition Program on Child Health at Birth By Catherine Haeck; Pierre Lefebvre
  46. Messages from the Ganges Basin development challenge: unlocking the production potential of the polders of the coastal zone of Bangladesh through water management investment and reform By Tuong, T. P.
  47. Labeling Farmed Seafood By Chen, Xianwen; Alfnes , Frode; Rickertsen , Kyrre
  48. The Relevance of Certifications and Business Practices in Linking Smallholders and Large Agro-businesses in Sub-Sahara Africa By Linda Kleemann
  49. On-farm treatment options for wastewater, greywater and fecal sludge with special reference to West Africa By Keraita, B.; Drechsel, Pay; Klutse, A.; Cofie, Olufunke O.
  50. Consumers and food waste - a review of research approaches and findings on point of purchase and in-household consumer behaviour By Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; de Hooge, Ilona; Amani, Pegah; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Gustavsson, Jenny
  51. Safety Stocks in Centralized and Decentralized Supply Chains under Different Types of Random Yields By Karl Inderfurth
  52. Consumer readiness to reduce meat consumptions and eat more climate friendly By Austgulen, Marthe H.; Skuland, Silje; Schjøll, Alexander; Alfnes, Frode
  53. Scaling up multiple use water services: accountability in the water sector By van Koppen, Barbara; Smits, S.; del Rio, C. R.; Thomas, J.
  54. Water-smart agriculture in East Africa By Nicol, Alan; Langan, Simon; Victor, Michael; Gonsalves, J.
  55. Human Values and Consumer Preferences for Extrinsic Credence Attributes in the Italian and German Markets for New Potatoes By Fitzsimmons, Jill Ann; Colantuoni, Francesca; Cicia, Gianni; Del Giudice, Teresa
  56. Strengthening the financial system for water in Mexico: from a conceptual framework to the formulation of pilot initiatives By Campanaro, A.
  57. Using choice experiments to assess the costs of supplying carbon offsets in beef production systems By Gowen, Rebecca
  58. On target for people and planet: setting and achieving water-related sustainable development goals By van der Bliek, Julie; McCornick, Peter; Clarke, James
  59. The impact of the sensory experience on scale and preference heterogeneity: The GMNL model approach to pig castration and meat quality By Kallas, Zein; Borrisser-Pairó, Francesc; Martínez, Beatriz; Vieira, Ceferina; Rubio, Begonia; Panella, Nuria; Gil, Marta; Linares, M. Belén; Garrido, M. Dolores; Ibañez, Miguel; M. Angels, Oliver; Gil, José María
  60. IWMI Strategy 2014-2018: solutions for a water-secure world By International Water Management Institute (IWMI).

  1. By: Vanzetti, David; Pham, Dung
    Abstract: Vietnam has designated 3.8 million hectares of agricultural land for paddy rice production, reflecting historical and ongoing concerns about food security. However, Vietnam is now the world’s second largest exporter of rice, and it imports vast quantities of livestock feed, some of which could be produced domestically if the land area restrictions were relaxed. Rather than improving food security, this policy may in fact increase malnourishment because some groups in the population lack a diversified diet. The Government has a plan to diversify into other crops. The implications of the Government land use policy for domestic consumers and producers of food, feed and livestock products are assessed in this paper with the aid of VAST, a dynamic, eight region, 13 commodity non-linear programming model of Vietnam’s agricultural sector. The reallocation of land currently designated for rice production would allow increased production of maize and a range of vegetable crops. However, the switch into feed products sold primarily on the domestic markets puts downward pressure on producer prices. The Government should remove restrictions on land use and let producers judge for themselves what products to grow.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics,
    Date: 2015–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare15:202980&r=agr
  2. By: Scheierling, S. M.
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046876&r=agr
  3. By: Ronaldo Serôa da Motta; Peter Herman May
    Date: 2015–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipe:ipetds:0032&r=agr
  4. By: Ryan, Mary; O'Donoghue, Cathal; Upton, Vincent; Handgraaf, Michael
    Abstract: In the context of incentivising farm afforestation to provide ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration to mitigate greenhouse gas production, this paper sheds new light on the complexity of the farm afforestation decision and the characteristics of the farms and the farmers who are likely or unlikely to afforest land. Using a panel dataset of farm level micro-data, we observe whether farming intensity changes as a result of planting. We generate forest and agriculture income streams and employ a life-cycle theoretical framework to analyse the relative importance of agricultural and forest financial drivers in the decision-making process at farm level. We find that for many farmers the afforestation decision involves a wider complex of contemporaneous farm decisions. We find that there is a relationship between financial drivers and the likelihood of planting but we also find that there is a cohort of older smaller farmers that will never plant, and for whom negative cultural attitudes are stronger than financial drivers. We also identify a cohort of large, younger farmers who might plant if the forest income is greater than the agricultural income. This paper describes the farm and farmer characteristics of these cohorts and concludes that a “one size fits all” programme based solely on financial incentives may not be the most appropriate means to encourage further farm afforestation.
    Keywords: Afforestation decision, life-cycle analysis, afforestation policy incentives, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204237&r=agr
  5. By: Akerele, Dare; Odeiyi, Kehinde
    Abstract: Consumption of diverse diets is an important factor in promoting good health and nutrition. Most of the studies on food demand in developing countries focused largely on the quantity consumed of specific foods or food-groups with marginalized attention on dietary diversity. This study examines the extent of food consumption diversity and the factors influencing demand for diverse foods in Nigeria using micro-data on 18191 households. The transformed versions (logistic transformation) of Berry and Entropy measures of dietary diversity were used as regressands in the econometrics models employed for analysis. Low-income households and households whose heads are females or without formal education have lower than the norm in terms of diversity in food consumption. Income, food prices (captured by food price index), access to remittance, educational attainment up to secondary school, sex of household head and spatial factors are important determinants of demand for varied diets. Income improvement strategy, renewed emphasis on nutrition education especially in secondary schools, efforts to curtail food price inflation and sensitively-guided gender-based interventions are advocated, among others. Findings call for evaluation of the extent to which policy actions in agriculture and other relevant sectors weaken or advance diet diversity in order to devise holistic strategies for nutrition and health.
    Keywords: Food diversity, dietary quality, Berry and Entropy measures, food and nutrition interventions, Agricultural and Food Policy, D12,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204210&r=agr
  6. By: Kolodinsky, Jane; Reynolds, Travis; Baker, Daniel; Watts, Richard
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202700&r=agr
  7. By: International Water Management Institute (IWMI).
    Keywords: Gender/Women/Climate change/Adaptation/Rural areas/Communities/Productivity/Households/Food security/Vegetables/Chars/Small scale farming/Living standards/Poverty/Case studies
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:polbrs:h046753&r=agr
  8. By: Willersinn, Christian; Mack, Gabriele; Siegrist, Michael; Mouron, Patrik
    Keywords: food waste, household, potatoes, drivers, determinants, Consumer/Household Economics, Crop Production/Industries, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202725&r=agr
  9. By: Allan, Corey; Kerr, Suzi
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare15:202515&r=agr
  10. By: Hasselbach, Johanna Lena; Rungie, Cam; Roosen, Jutta
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202729&r=agr
  11. By: International Water Management Institute (IWMI).
    Keywords: Climate change/Farmers/Gender/Women/Households/Land ownership
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:polbrs:h046579&r=agr
  12. By: Ortiz, R.
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046809&r=agr
  13. By: Iannario, Maria; Manisera, Marica; Zuccolotto, Paola
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202704&r=agr
  14. By: Wang, Zanxin
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare15:202586&r=agr
  15. By: Lykke E. Andersen
    Abstract: This paper compares the Total Economic Value of standing Amazonian rain forest with the Net Present Value of alternative agricultural land uses. It is shown that, at the current level of deforestation, the potential benefits of deforestation are higher than the expected costs. As the level of deforestation increases, however, the global costs of deforestation will rise, and eventually pass the value of agricultural land. At that point, the international community will have to provide incentives to induce Brazil to preserve the remainder of its rain forest.
    Date: 2015–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipe:ipetds:0065&r=agr
  16. By: Cosmina, Marta; Gallenti, Gianluigi; Marangon, Francesco; Troiano, Stefania
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202733&r=agr
  17. By: McFadden, Brandon R.; Lusk, Jayson L.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202696&r=agr
  18. By: Miklós, Ilona
    Abstract: Using a case study, this paper examines how EU geographical indications (GIs) standards can integrate into Hungarian socio-embodied patterns. It uses apricots from the underdeveloped region of Hungary as an example, defined in the EU GI context as a local resource of cultural identity. The collective memory of the Gönc region is examined in relation to products and services that have existed for generations. It suggests that innovative responses to existing isolated economic services could provide coherence among the three pillars of sustainability given policy and institutional innovations addressed through domestic laws and policies designed to innovate and expand markets.
    Keywords: Underdeveloped Region, Social Patterns, Socio-Emboided, Sustainabilit, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:200341&r=agr
  19. By: Anonymous
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202753&r=agr
  20. By: Drechsel, Pay; Heffer, P.; Magen, H.; Mikkelsen, R.; Wichelns, D.
    Keywords: Water management; Water productivity; Sustainable agriculture; Irrigation systems; Irrigated farming; Intensification; Nitrogen fertilizers; Nutrients; Soil fertility; Food security; Ecosystem services; Water use efficiency; Water supply; Crop yield; Humid climate zones; Subhumid zones; Rainfed farming; Wastewater treatment; Wastewater irrigation; Biochemical compounds; Evapotranspiration; Arid zones
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046805&r=agr
  21. By: Garavaglia, Christian; Mariani, Paolo
    Abstract: This study investigates consumers’ preferences and WTP for PDO certifications. First, the paper proposes the use of a new index in food studies to measure WTP. We focus on dry-cured ham in Italy. Our results add a geographical dimension to studies of consumer preferences by providing evidence of the existence of differences based on place of residence. Consumers who live in the same area where certified ham is produced are willing to pay a lower premium price than consumers living farther away are willing to pay: the closer consumers live to the area of production of the certified product, the less they refer to extrinsic certification cues.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:200376&r=agr
  22. By: Loughrey, Jason; Thorne, Fiona; Hennessy, Thia
    Abstract: Tillage farmers must manage numerous economic risks including uncertain yields and prices. Despite the presence of government subsidies, these factors can generate a relatively high variability in farm income. The improved management of farm income variability can contribute towards stability in household consumption, support for farm investments and further investment in child education. Forward contracting is the main available risk management tool for Irish tillage farmers. This paper uses a stochastic farm-level model to simulate the potential direct profit impact of this tool under alternative scenarios where 20 per cent of expected output is forward sold. Our results suggest that risk averse farmers may be willing in these scenarios, to forego approximately one to two per cent of their overall farm income to receive the protection of forward contracts. The proportion of market based income tends to be much greater as many tillage farms rely on government subsidies for a majority of their income. The overall direct profit impact also depends on the costs of production and the share of production committed to the contract.
    Keywords: Spring Barley, Forward Contract, Risk Management, Stochastic Model, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, International Development, C15, D81, Q12,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204228&r=agr
  23. By: Wynand Carel Johannes Grobler (North West University Vaal Campus)
    Abstract: Heads of state attending the 1996 World Food Summit in 1996 signed the Rome Declaration on World Food Security re-affirming ”the right of everyone to have access to safe and nutritious food, consistent with the right to adequate food, and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger (FAO,1996). Despite this more than 900 million people across the world were still food insecure in 2010 (FAO, 2010). Food Security is a critical problem facing policy makers in Sub Sahara Africa as more than 45 present of households have moderate to severe household food insecurity.. Research indicates that Africa’s population is moving to the cities and that by 2030 more than 50 percent of the population may reside in urban areas. Furthermore, food insecurity is becoming recognised as increasingly urban, with a lack of policy focus by governments to address the growing food insecurity problem in urban settings. Studies on the extent of poverty in South Africa show that almost half of its population lives in poverty. Food availability is not the only condition for food security in urban settings if households do not have financial resources to access food. Households rely on income for their food security, spend a large proportion of household s budget on food, and have little access to other safety nets like agriculture or land to ensure food access.. This paper examines the socio economic determinants of households which may impact on food insecurity in urban settings. A quantitative research method was deployed and a stratified random sample of 600 was used to determine which socio economic determinants determine food insecurity in an urban setting. Regression analyses were used to determine the effects of socio-economic determinants on household food insecurity. The results show that household food insecurity is influenced by the age of the head of the household, education of the head of the household, employment status of the head of the household, income of the head of the household, social grants received by the household and spending patterns of the household The study recommends that government should develop a more comprehensive strategy, focusing on urban areas in South Africa to increase access to food in the absence of available land to ensure access to food.
    Keywords: Food Security, Economic Development, Welfare Economics, Spending Patterns, Socio Economic Determinants.
    JEL: I15 O10 Q18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sek:iacpro:1003643&r=agr
  24. By: Ayenew, Habtamu Yesigat; Sauer, Johannes; Abate-Kassa, Getachew
    Abstract: Using a moment based approach, introduced by Antle for producers’ risk behavior elicitation, we develop an empirical model to evaluate the implication of risk preferences on farm level diversification. For the purpose, we use a household level panel data of years 2004 and 2009 from Ethiopia. The estimation is done in two stages; the first one for the elicitation of risk aversion behavior of farm households and the second one, for the inclusion of the first estimate on the factors that determine the level of on-farm diversification. To control for endogeneity problem in the estimation of diversification equation, we use efficient two stage least squares technique. We find that farmers with higher level of relative risk premium will more likely opt for more on-farm diversification. The engagement of farm households to off and non-farm income generating activities could likely reduce the on-farm diversification level. These could be due to the fact that households with income from off and non-farm activities use this income as a safety net and go for specialized farms.
    Keywords: Ethiopia, risk aversion, risk management, smallholder, Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204223&r=agr
  25. By: Gaeta, Davide; Corsinovi, Paola
    Abstract: The game of chess between EU and US (TTIP) for the wine sector revolves around two main issues on which the negotiating partners are divided. The first regards the recognition of EU wines with PDO and PGI and protection of “semi-generic names”. The second considers the protection of “traditional terms” (TTs) used as description of product characteristics or production systems and represents the highest expression of excellence as synonymous with quality recognized. Towards an overview of the claims, different requests and debates on the ongoing TTIP, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate how international trade finds itself increasingly threatened and facing a series of obstacles along with showing the disparities between EU and US. Beyond the official position, the real game is played between selfish interests: those who defend collective brand reputation and those who support the private brand interest.
    Keywords: Wine, Traditional Terms, Appellation of Origin, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:200234&r=agr
  26. By: Paragahawewa, Upananda H.; Doole, Graeme J.; Bower, Bob
    Abstract: High nitrate concentrations have been reported within Canterbury aquifers due to agricultural intensification. Reducing nutrient loadings to groundwater by a reasonable degree is difficult for industry because of the anticipated cost of effective mitigation technologies. A novel alternative is to decrease nitrate concentration through increasing the amount of water present in the aquifer through the use of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) in combination with some minor farm-level mitigation practices. However, this poses a difficult economic problem that involves balancing the benefit of lowering nitrate concentrations in groundwater, improving reliability of groundwater availability for future irrigation, the capital cost of MAR infrastructure, and the cost of source surface water to use in the dilution. This study presents a dynamic economic analysis that weights these alternative sources of value. Overall, it is shown that a MAR scheme is of positive value to both the environment and economy, with an average benefit: cost ratio of four, and around $76m of income and 170FTE of employment gain per annum at regional level.
    Keywords: Economic analysis, Managed aquifer recharge, Mitigation, Nutrient loading, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare15:202984&r=agr
  27. By: Piccoli, Bruno; Recchia, Annamaria; Zoboli, Gian Paolo; Dinnella, Caterina
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202741&r=agr
  28. By: Zannoni, Mario
    Abstract: The first known formal assessment of Parmigiano-Reggiano quality dates back to 1867 and was done by a commercial company to promote trade. In 1934, the Consortium, a collective organization of producers, introduced controls to improve market image by using a mark of quality. Beginning in 1954, and continuing after the PDO recognition by the European Union in 1992, the government became an actor in the qualification process of Parmigiano-Reggiano. Evolution and changes in the quality control of Parmigiano-Reggiano were influenced more by the demands of the trade than by changes in production practices due to the modernization of the process.
    Keywords: Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese, Designation of Origin, Trade, Quality Control, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa145:200230&r=agr
  29. By: Sanders, C.M.; Guenther, M.; Tait, P.R.; Daziel, P.C.
    Abstract: Understanding international consumer preferences and attitudes towards food is important for countries like New Zealand that depend heavily on food exports. New Zealand’s export focus has changed over the last few decades from almost all exports going to Europe, to more into Asian markets, in particular to China. It is therefore important that different cultures and preferences in these markets are considered and understood. This paper will present results from a pilot survey in six countries (UK, Korea, Japan, India, China and Indonesia) focusing on how consumers in different markets respond to different attributes and on how New Zealand producers can communicate those using smart technology and digital media in overseas markets. The results highlight the importance of food safety and health foods in these markets. In general, developing countries valued attributes more than developed countries. This included environmental quality in food which was also seen as key for underpinning food safety.
    Keywords: Consumer preferences, food products, smart media, New Zealand, developing countries, cross-country comparison, Consumer/Household Economics, International Relations/Trade, D120,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204206&r=agr
  30. By: Johnson, M.
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046297&r=agr
  31. By: Castellari, Elena; Berning, Joshua
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202737&r=agr
  32. By: Kuhfuss, L.; Preget, R.; Thoyer, S.; Hanley, N.; Le Coent, P.; Desole, M.
    Abstract: Agri-environmental schemes (AES), implemented to address a wide range of environmental issues, suffer from what has been referred to as the “end of the contract problem”, in the sense that many of the land management practices adopted under the scheme cannot be expected to persist in the absence of payments. A first objective of this paper is therefore to investigate farmers’ actual land management intentions at the end of AES contracts. The second objective is to investigate the effect of social norms, and framing of these norms, on the likely permanence of land management practices adopted under AES. That is, we are interested in whether a “nudge” in the form of a social norm can help solve the end of contract problem. Our results are based on the stated intentions of 395 farmers participating in the French AES scheme MAEt. They show that almost half of the farmers of our sample are willing to maintain the practices adopted during the AES even in the absence of payments after the contract ends, and that information about what other farmers intend to do – the social norm - can greatly influence farmers’ decisions. However, the framing of this information has no significant effect on stated intentions.
    Keywords: Agri-environmental schemes, Permanence, Framing, Social norm, Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy, Q18, Q28, D03,
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204233&r=agr
  33. By: International Water Management Institute (IWMI)
    Keywords: Irrigation schemes; Households; Food production; Income; Farmers; Agriculture
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046953&r=agr
  34. By: Natarajan, Rajmohan
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046775&r=agr
  35. By: Irz, Xavier; Leroy, Pascal; Réquillart, Vincent; Solerb, Louis-Georges
    Keywords: Farm Management, Marketing,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202721&r=agr
  36. By: Dillon, Emma Jane; Hennessy, Thia; Howley, Peter; Heanue, Kevin
    Abstract: Animal health is one of the key factors affecting the economic efficiency of the dairy industry and has important implications within an increasingly competitive marketplace. Despite the fact that the economic gains of ‘best practice’ with regard to animal health have been well documented, many farmers are still not adopting optimal herd management techniques. This paper utilises Irish nationally representative farm-level data from 2013 to identify drivers and barriers to the adoption of ‘best practice’ with regard to mastitis management. Exploratory factor analysis and econometric techniques (logistic regression methods) were employed here to empirically assess the influence of farmers’ attitudes towards animal health and mastitis on the adoption of particular mastitis hygiene and herd management practices by farmers. A number of interesting issues arise in identifying barriers to the uptake of ‘best practice,’ these include the possibility of routine inertia, i.e., farmers do not deviate from the routine developed around mastitis prevention until there is an indication of infection, as well as time and cost constraints. Farmer behavior with respect to mastitis management can thus be considered ‘reactionary’ as opposed to ‘precautionary.’ This research highlights the valuable role of the extension agent in influencing the uptake of animal health ‘best practice’ but concludes that engagement around knowledge transfer and ‘best practice’ technology adoption is particularly complex.
    Keywords: Animal health, technology adoption, attitudes, behaviour., Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Q100, Q160, and Q180.,
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc15:204215&r=agr
  37. By: Corsi, Alessandro; Novelli, Silvia
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Farm Management,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202749&r=agr
  38. By: Farfan,Gabriela; Genoni,Maria Eugenia; Vakis,Renos
    Abstract: Consumption of food away from home is rapidly growing across the developing world. Surprisingly, the majority of household surveys around the world haven not kept up with its pace and still collect limited information on it. The implications for poverty and inequality measurement are far from clear, and the direction of the impact cannot be established a priori, since consumption of food away from home affects both food consumption and the poverty line. This paper exploits rich data on food away from home collected as part of the National Household Survey in Peru, shedding light to the extent to which welfare measures differ depending on whether they properly account for food away from home. Peru is a relevant context, with the average Peruvian household spending 28 percent of their food budget on food away from home by 2010. The analysis indicates that failure to account for the consumption of food away from home has important implications for poverty and inequality measures as well as the understanding of who the poor are. First, accounting for food away from home results in extreme poverty rates that are 18 percent higher and moderate poverty rates that are 16 percent lower. These results are also consistent, in fact more pronounced, with poverty gap and severity measures. Second, consumption inequality measured by the Gini coefficient decreases by 1.3 points when food away from home is included, a significant reduction. Finally, inclusion of food away from home results in a reclassification of households from poor to non-poor status and vice versa: 20 percent of the poor are different when the analysis includes consumption of food away from home. This effect is large enough that a standard poverty profile analysis results in significant differences between the poverty classification based on whether food away from home is included or not. The differences cover many dimensions, including demographics, education, and labor market characteristics. Taken together, the results indicate that a serious rethinking of how to deal with the consumption of food away from home in measuring well-being is urgently needed to properly estimate and understand poverty around the world.
    Keywords: Rural Poverty Reduction,Regional Economic Development,Poverty Lines,Food&Beverage Industry
    Date: 2015–05–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7257&r=agr
  39. By: Stein, C.; Barron, J.; Nigussie, L.; Gedif, B.; Amsalu, T.; Langan, Simon
    Keywords: Agriculture; Water management; Energy sources; Energy management; food security; River basins; Research; corporate culture; Social structure; Natural resources management; Ecosystems; Environmental protection; Land resources; Stakeholders; Sustainability
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046623&r=agr
  40. By: CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE).
    Keywords: Ecosystem services; Agriculture; Landscape; Agroecosystems; Productivity; Rice; Governance; Sustainability; Communities; Rural areas; Living standards; Poverty; Food security; Nutrition; Public health; Income; Investment; Stakeholders; Farmers; Soil conservation; Planning; Impact assessment; Monitoring; Decision making; Case studies
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046683&r=agr
  41. By: Zouabi, Oussama; Kahia, Montassar
    Abstract: Unlike previous studies, this paper, by employing a cointegration technique on panel data, economically investigates the direct effect of climate change on the cereal production in the long-term via a new cereal disaggregated databases covering the period 1979-2012 for 24 governorates in Tunisia within a multivariate panel framework. The Pedroni (1999, 2004) panel cointegration test indicates that there is a long-run equilibrium relationship between the considered variables with elasticities estimated positive and statistically significant in the long-run. The results generally confirm that in the long term there is a strong positive correlation between the cereal production and the direct effect of precipitation and temperature for the whole panel. At the micro-spatial level, results of the long-run equilibrium relationship show that the cereal production is extremely dependent on rainfall in most governorates of cereals producers, especially the Northwest region of Tunisia. In fact, there are several initiatives and policies that must be undertaken by Government in an attempt to improve the long term production of cereals in the most affected governorates by the phenomenon of climate change such as the development of several important and regionally-based institutions and cooperation, providing subsidies to farmers.
    Keywords: Climate change, Cereal, Tunisia, Panel cointegration.
    JEL: C33 Q13 Q54
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:64441&r=agr
  42. By: CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE).
    Keywords: Gender; Women; Discrimination; Empowerment; Natural resources management; Ecosystems; Living standards; Households; Decision making; Budgets; Capacity building; Research programmes
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046341&r=agr
  43. By: Srinivasan, V.
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046359&r=agr
  44. By: Merrey, D. J.
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046989&r=agr
  45. By: Catherine Haeck (Department of Economics, University of Quebec in Montreal); Pierre Lefebvre (Department of Economics, University of Quebec in Montreal)
    Abstract: We study the impact of a Canadian prenatal nutrition program on child health at birth. The objective of the OLO program is to reduce the incidence of prematurity and low birth weight by providing a specific food basket and nutritional guidance to pregnant women in situations of poverty. Our identification strategy exploits exogeneous variations in access to the program caused by the progressive implementation of the program by local community service centers. The administrative birth records used in this study provide early health outcomes (birth weight and gestational age) for over 1.5 million newborns, along with a number of family characteristics. Our results suggest that the program had a positive impact on the birth weight of children and reduced the incidence of low birth weight, with larger impacts on children of mothers with a high school degree or less. While the cost of the program is equivalent to the US comparable WIC program, the food basket is simpler and the gains on birth weight are larger.
    Keywords: child health at birth, public program
    JEL: I12 I18 J13
    Date: 2014–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:grc:wpaper:14-01&r=agr
  46. By: Tuong, T. P.
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046498&r=agr
  47. By: Chen, Xianwen (School of Economics and Business, Norwegian University of Life Sciences); Alfnes , Frode (School of Economics and Business, Norwegian University of Life Sciences); Rickertsen , Kyrre (School of Economics and Business, Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
    Abstract: Aquaculture supplies almost half of the world’s seafood consumption. As the market for farmed seafood matures, an increased differentiation through the use of labels is expected. Labels can be categorized as mandatory or voluntary, depending on whether the label is required by law or not. In most developed countries, mandatory seafood labels include information about species, whether the seafood is farmed or wild, and area of origin. Voluntary labels frequently includes information regarding sustainability, organic production, and safety. We discuss labeling practices and conduct a review of consumer studies related to labels used for farmed seafood.
    Keywords: aquaculture; farmed seafood; mandatory label; voluntary label; product differentiation.
    JEL: Q18 Q22 Q51
    Date: 2015–05–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:nlsseb:2015_010&r=agr
  48. By: Linda Kleemann
    Abstract: Smallholders often have to certify according to international standards and produce under contract for large agro-businesses to access the export market. While mostly positive effects for the farmers have been found for contracts and certifications, little is known about the role of individual firm behavior and certifications in shaping farmer-agro-business relationships and contract success. This is what this article does. Data of 386 smallholders in the pineapple export sector in Ghana is analyzed quantitatively and enriched by a detailed case study of a large-scale agro-business in Ghana called Blues Skies. The results show that certification is an agent of change in farmer–agro-business relations. Building trust and aligning expectations of farmers and firms is important for success. Additionally, individual firm behavior matters more than taken into account in previous research. Our case study shows that three “R”, reliability, reputation and respect, constitute the basis for contract relationships that benefit all
    Keywords: contract farming, certification, smallholders, Ghana, firm behavior
    JEL: D21
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:kie:kieliw:1997&r=agr
  49. By: Keraita, B.; Drechsel, Pay; Klutse, A.; Cofie, Olufunke O.
    Keywords: On-farm research; Wastewater treatment; Water quality; Water storage; Irrigation water; Faecal coliforms; Sewage sludge; Contamination; Reservoirs; Filtration; Weirs; Ponds; Wells; Wetlands; Health hazards; Farmers; Sedimentation; Helminths; Moringa
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046382&r=agr
  50. By: Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; de Hooge, Ilona; Amani, Pegah; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Gustavsson, Jenny
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202716&r=agr
  51. By: Karl Inderfurth (Faculty of Economics and Management, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg)
    Abstract: Safety stock planning with focus on risk protection to cope with demand uncertainties is a very well researched topic in the field of supply chain management, in central as well as in local decision making systems. In contrast, there is only few knowledge about safety stock management in situations where supply risks have to be covered that are caused by uncertainties with respect to production yields. In this study, a two-stage manufacturer-retailer supply chain is considered in a single-period context that allows for an analytical study of the impact of yield randomness on safety stock determination. In order to concentrate the analysis on the effects of yield uncertainty demand will be assumed to be deterministic. We consider three basic types of yield randomness which represent different reasons for yield losses in production processes each, namely the stochastically proportional, binomial, and interrupted geometric yield type. It will be shown that these different yield risk specifications can bring about completely different properties with regard to the way safety stocks depend on various input parameters in supply chain planning. This holds especially for the impact of the demand size and for the influence of the level of product profitability in a supply chain. In an analytical model-based investigation it is demonstrated that these safety stock properties not only differ between the respective yield types, but also between systems of central and decentralized supply chain decision making. Thus, this study presents general insights into the importance of a correct yield type specification for an effective safety stock management and explains necessary differences in the stock distribution across supply chain stages in both centralized and decentralized settings.
    Keywords: Random yield, safety stocks, supply chain decisions, yield types
    Date: 2015–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:mag:wpaper:150007&r=agr
  52. By: Austgulen, Marthe H.; Skuland, Silje; Schjøll, Alexander; Alfnes, Frode
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202757&r=agr
  53. By: van Koppen, Barbara; Smits, S.; del Rio, C. R.; Thomas, J.
    Keywords: Water use efficiency; Domestic water; Drinking water; Water allocation; Public services; Public sector; Local government; Sanitation; Public health; Irrigation; Poverty; Employment
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046385&r=agr
  54. By: Nicol, Alan; Langan, Simon; Victor, Michael; Gonsalves, J.
    Keywords: Agriculture; Water productivity; Small scale farming; Irrigation schemes; Drip irrigation; Vegetable growing; Climate change; Adaptation; Food security; Drought tolerance; Crops; Sorghum; Rice; Maize; Livestock production; Land management; Watershed management; Rain; Water harvesting; Water conservation; Water use; Water storage; Groundwater; Rehabilitation; Soil conservation; Participatory approaches; Highlands; Erosion; Sustainable development; Arid lands; Catchment areas; Wetlands; Income; Incentives; Smallholders; Dams; Gender; Natural resources management; Learning; Collective action; Case studies
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046950&r=agr
  55. By: Fitzsimmons, Jill Ann; Colantuoni, Francesca; Cicia, Gianni; Del Giudice, Teresa
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202745&r=agr
  56. By: Campanaro, A.
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h046879&r=agr
  57. By: Gowen, Rebecca
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2015–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare15:202565&r=agr
  58. By: van der Bliek, Julie; McCornick, Peter; Clarke, James
    Keywords: Water governance; Water quality; Groundwater; Water resources; Water management; Domestic water; Water policy; Water accounting; Wastewater; Food security; Energy; Sustainable development; Ecosystem services; Climate change; Flooding; Drought; Farmers; Economic growth; Social aspects; Women; River basins
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046660&r=agr
  59. By: Kallas, Zein; Borrisser-Pairó, Francesc; Martínez, Beatriz; Vieira, Ceferina; Rubio, Begonia; Panella, Nuria; Gil, Marta; Linares, M. Belén; Garrido, M. Dolores; Ibañez, Miguel; M. Angels, Oliver; Gil, José María
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2015–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa143:202708&r=agr
  60. By: International Water Management Institute (IWMI).
    Keywords: Strategy planning; Research institutes; Research programmes; Institutional development; Water security; Water management; Land management; Food security
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:bosers:h046441&r=agr

This nep-agr issue is ©2015 by Angelo Zago. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.