nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2014‒05‒24
71 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
University of Verona

  1. New England Retail Food Cooperatives and Our Regional Food System By Bradley, Kari
  2. Foreign Land Deals in Africa: Implications for Agricultural Trade By Ogundipe, Adeyemi; Akinyemi, Opeyemi; Ogundipe, Oluwatomisin
  3. Agricultural Land Use By Lynch, Lori
  4. Nutrient Allowances Market and Wetland Abatement By Natacha Fauvet; Jean-Christophe Pereau
  5. Leveraging USDA Programs For Economic Development Through Food Systems By Oakley, Emily
  6. Emerging Opportunities in the Local Food Economy By Land, Guy
  7. Public Markets at the Urban/Rural Interface By Carmody, Dan
  8. The role of weather derivatives and portfolio effects in agricultural water management By Buchholz, Matthias; Musshoff, Oliver
  9. Assessing different systems for enhancing farm income and resilience in extreme dry region of India By Kumar, Shalander; Haileslassie, Amare; Thiagarajah, Ramilan; Wani, Suhas P.
  10. Social Media--A Challenge for the Agri-Food-Industry By Kayser, Maike; Kroger, Rhena; Theuvsen, Ludwig
  11. Criteria-Based Evaluation of Selected European Animal Welfare labels: Initiatives from the Poultry Meat Sector By Heise, Heinke; Pirsich, Wiebke; Theuvsen, Ludwig
  12. Effects of Peers on Agricultural Productivity in Rural Northern India By Songsermsawas, Tisorn; Baylis, Kathy; Chhatre, Ashwini
  13. Does use of social media affect food choice in the light of food safety issues? By Grebitus, Carola; Roosen, Jutta; Seitz, Carolin
  14. Economic Development, Food Demand and the Consequences for Agricultural Resource Requirements (Indonesia) By Briggs, Adam; Chowdhury, Shyamal
  15. Willingness of north Australian pastoralists and graziers to participate in contractual biodiversity conservation By Greiner, Romy
  16. Influences of Social Networks on Food Choices: A Comparison of Local, Regional, and National Perspectives By Liang, Chyi-Lyi (Kathleen); Pescatore, Matthew
  17. An experimental approach to assessment of trading and allocation mechanisms for nutrient trading By Marsh, Dan; Tucker, Steve; Doole, Graeme
  18. Determinants of land use in wheat production: The Australian wheat-sheep zone By Culas, Richard J.
  19. Transformation of the Pattern and Habits of Food Consumption of the of the Rural Population of Russian Federation By Morekhanova, Marina
  20. A New Mix of Private and Public How Well Might the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act Work? By Caswell, Julie A.; Boys, Kathryn
  21. Farmland Markets and Farm Business Finances By Ifft, Jennifer
  22. Climate Variability and International Migration: The Importance of the Agricultural Linkage By Ruohong Cai; Shuaizhang Feng; Mariola Pytliková; Michael Oppenheimer
  23. The Determinants of Consumer Confidence in Credence Attributes:Trust in the Food System and in Brands By Lassoued, Rim; Hobbs, Jill E.
  24. Deconstructing Wheat Price Spikes: A Model of Supply and Demand, Financial Speculation, and Commodity Price Comovement By Adjemian, Michael; Janzen, Joseph; Carter, Colin; Smith, Aaron
  25. Climate change mitigation as catastrophic risk management By Dietz, Simon
  26. Farm Income Outlook for 2014 and Beyond By Gloy, Brent
  27. Payments for Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils: Incentives for the Future and Rewards for the Past By Mireille Chiroleu-Assouline; Sebastien Roussel
  28. Food Marketing Understanding and influencing consumer demand By Pearson, Dr. David
  29. Impact of land administration programs on agricultural productivity and rural development: existing evidence, challenges and new approaches By Jérémie Gignoux; Karen Macours; Liam Wren-Lewis
  30. Does it pay to integrate irrigated forages in a beef cattle breeding operation in north Queensland? By Monjardino, M; MacLeod, N.; Prestwidge, D.
  31. Rice mountain Assessment of the Thai rice pledging program By Permani, Risti; Vanzetti, David
  32. Application of Multi-Commodity Partial Equilibrium Model to Quantify the Welfare Benefits of Research By Nedumaran, S.; Bantilan, Cynthia; Mason-D'Croz, Daniel; Singh, Piara
  33. The Impact of the 2013 CAP Reform on Land Capitalization By Pavel Ciaian; d'Artis Kancs; Johan Swinnen
  34. Information and Communication Technology, Agricultural Profitability, and Child Labor in Rural Peru By Diether Beuermann
  35. Weather and Welfare: Health and Agricultural Impacts of Climate Extremes, Evidence from Mexico By Federico Guerrero
  36. What risks do agricultural interventions entail for nutrition? By Dury, S.; Alpha, A.; Bichard, A.
  37. The Impact of Agricultural Extension for Improved Management Practices: An Evaluation of the Uruguayan Livestock Program By Conner Mullally; Alessandro Maffioli
  38. The Role of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service to Ensure Foodborne Disease Control and Prevention By Goldman, David
  39. Vulnerabilities of developing countries to food commodity price risks : International responses By Alexandros SARRIS
  40. ARE ITALIAN FARMERS WELL PREPARED TO TACKLE THE CHALLENGE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS? By Galluzzo, Nicola
  41. Farm productivity in an Australian region affected by a changing climate By Islam, Nazrul; Xayavong, Vilaphonh; Anderton, Lucy; Feldman, David
  42. Social Learning and Communication By Ariel BenYishay; A. Mushfiq Mobarak
  43. USDA Grains and Oilseeds Outlook Agricultural Outlook Forum 2014 By Ash, Mark S.
  44. Poverty-Food Security Nexus: Evidences from a Survey of Urban Slum Dwellers in Kolkata By Chandana Maitra; Prof. D.S Prasada Rao
  45. Outlook for US Agriculture By Glauber, Joe
  46. Determinants Of Peanut Paste Eating Frequency In Urban Ghana: Does Household Members’Preference Matter? By Meng, Ting; Florkowski, Wojciech J.; Sarpong, Daniel; Resurreccion, Anna V. A.
  47. Measuring direct losses to rice production from extreme flood events in Quang Nam province, Vietnam By Chau, Vu Ngoc; Cassells, Sue; Holland, John
  48. Pro-rural policies, income and inequality : Evaluating a cash-for-work program in rural China By Yu Chen; Sylvie Démurger
  49. Wheat Area-Yield Insurance Effectiveness: Simulating Rates in Australian Reality By Orlowski, Jan Alexander Kazimierz
  50. Indispensable Partners in Growing Markets Around the World for America's Agricultural By Heinen, Suzanne
  51. On the design of water markets in the presence of risk aversion By Bontems, Philippe; Nauges, Celine
  52. Intellectual Property Rights and International Trade of Agricultural Products By Mercedes Campi; Marco Duenas
  53. Vertical Price Transmission and Relationships Between Selected Agri-food Value Chains in Australia and Colombia By Morales, L. Emilio; Hoang, Nam; Griffith, Garry; Salcedo, Salomon
  54. Plant-based Bioeconomy in Central Germany - Mapping of Actors, Industries and Places By Wilfried Ehrenfeld; Frieder Kropfhäußer
  55. Valuation framing and attribute scope variation in a choice experiment to asses the impacts of changing land use from agriculture to mining By Windle, Jill; Rolfe, John
  56. Should conservation contracts include incentive payments and also be put up for tender? By Schilizzi, Steven; Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe
  57. Climate Variability and Migration: Evidence from Tanzania By Mathilde MAUREL; Zaneta KUBIK
  58. RETHINKING THE TECHNICAL EFFICIENCY OF SMALL SCALE YAM FARMERS IN NIGERIA USING CONVENTIONAL AND NON-CONVENTIONAL INEFFICIENCY PARAMETERS By Nmadu, Job N.; Simpa, James O.
  59. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF ADOPTION OF INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (IPM) BY QUEBEC GRAIN FARMERS By West, Gale E.; Cisse, Ismaelh Ahmed
  60. Biodiesel vs. ethanol, UE vs. US biofuels: So different in terms of LUC impact? By Agneta Forslund; Alexandre Gohin; Chantal Le Mouël; Fabrice Levert
  61. The Evolution of the California Blueberry Industry: A Social Network Analysis Approach By Plakias, Zoe
  62. USDA Regional Hubs for Risk Adaptation and Mitigation to Climate Change By Hohenstein, William
  63. How Farmers’ Preferences for Crop Attributes Affect High Value Crop Adoption? By Suprehatin; Umberger, Wendy J.; Yi, Dale; Stringer, Randy
  64. Does income growth improve diet diversity in China? By Doan, Dung
  65. LAND POLICIES FOR UPLAND CAMBODIA: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND IMPACTS ON LAND USE By Yoeu, Asikin; Pillot, Didier; Salles, Jean-Michael; Neang, Malyne
  66. Four decades of rice water productivity in Bangladesh: A spatio-temporal analysis of district level panel data By Mohammad Alauddin; Upali A. Amarasinghe; Bharat R. Sharma
  67. Area Yield Crop Insurance: Effectiveness of an Australian simulation By Orlowski, Jan Alexander Kazimierz
  68. Is the rebound effect or Jevons paradox a useful concept for better management of water resources? Insights from the Irrigation Modernisation Process in Spain By Aurélien Dumont; Beatriz Mayor; Elena López-Gunn
  69. A New Face for the Mexican Agriculture. The Sugar Cane Agroindustry. By Rello L., Carlos
  70. The Impact of Wheat Export Market Deregulation upon Wheat Growers in Victoria’s Western Wimmera By O'Keeffe, Patrick
  71. Economics of Conservation Practice Adoption: Thinking Beyond the Box By Jennings, Mark

  1. By: Bradley, Kari
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2014–02–21
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168321&r=agr
  2. By: Ogundipe, Adeyemi; Akinyemi, Opeyemi; Ogundipe, Oluwatomisin
    Abstract: This study investigates the implications of foreign land deals in Africa especially with regard to agricultural trade. It is motivated essentially by large scale foreign deals of land in Africa, Latin America, Central Asia and Southeast Asia that have been reported in recent years. One of the driving forces has been attributed to the presumed availability of land in these regions. This study employs data sourced from World Development Indicators and World Governance Indicators on key variables such as arable land per person, agricultural land as percentage of land area, net food import, regulatory quality, among others (1995-2010) on selected African countries where instances of foreign land deals have been reported. The study formulates empirical models that draw from institutional development theory, which is estimated using the Generalized Method of Moments (GMM). The study found LSFLDs to impact negatively on agricultural export in selected countries, the indexes of institutional framework used were found to be significant; likewise, agricultural land becomes highly significant with relative larger magnitude when interacted with institutional indexes. This therefore implies that as more agricultural land is acquired, agricultural export tends to dwindle and incidences of food insecurity are heightened. The preliminary investigation suggests the need for controlling the issue of massive foreign land deals through viable institutional framework, which can be engendered by building sound legal and procedural measures that will protect local rights and take into account the aspirations of local farmers and the welfare of citizenry.
    Keywords: Agricultural exports, Food security; Institutional quality; Land deals
    JEL: F21 Q15 Q18 R52
    Date: 2013–12–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:56075&r=agr
  3. By: Lynch, Lori
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168447&r=agr
  4. By: Natacha Fauvet (GREThA); Jean-Christophe Pereau (GREThA)
    Abstract: The buffering function of wetlands is one of the most efficient mechanisms for regulating agricultural runoffs and water pollution. The aim of this paper is to show how farmers could use wetland abatement as a way to achieve pollution targets set by a regulator in a nutrient allowance market. The introduction of allowances into farmers’ maximisation programs creates an incentive to either reduce fertilizer use per hectare of crops, or to restore wetlands on agricultural land. Comparative statics results express a negative correlation between the quantity of allowances per farmer and the fertilizer use. Furthermore, the quantity of allowances per farmer is negatively correlated to the wetland surface area.
    Keywords: Nutrients, Wetlands, Agriculture, Permit market, Regulation, Allowances, Runoffs
    JEL: Q15 Q28
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fae:wpaper:2014.06&r=agr
  5. By: Oakley, Emily
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168656&r=agr
  6. By: Land, Guy
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Crop Production/Industries, Marketing,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168427&r=agr
  7. By: Carmody, Dan
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168327&r=agr
  8. By: Buchholz, Matthias; Musshoff, Oliver
    Abstract: Restrictive irrigation water policies established due to e.g. environmental concerns or water scarcity appear to result in declining farm income and arising risk exposure in terms of yield uncertainty. With this in mind, we investigate the potential of index-based weather insurance, which is also known as weather derivatives, to cope with the economic disadvantages for farmers resulting from a reduction in water quotas and increased water prices. By means of a whole-farm risk programming approach, we systematically compare crop portfolios without and with the possibility of purchasing standardized weather derivatives based on precipitation and temperature indices. In doing so, we allow for crop diversification as well as water reallocation between crops. Thus, overcoming some of the shortcomings inherent to previous studies in this strand of research. In an application to a representative cash crop farm in northern Germany, we found that the use of weather derivatives offsets the loss in the farmer’s certainty equivalent resulting from moderate reductions in water quotas and water price increases. Our results also indicate that weather derivatives have the potential to substantially alter farm plans and the optimal irrigation water demand. Far reaching environmental implications might be the consequence which require further attention and careful consideration by policymakers.
    Keywords: Irrigation, index-based weather insurance, whole-farm risk programming, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2014–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165812&r=agr
  9. By: Kumar, Shalander; Haileslassie, Amare; Thiagarajah, Ramilan; Wani, Suhas P.
    Abstract: Enhancing resilience among small farm households in dry regions is important to cope with extreme weather conditions and changing climate. This study presents the results of assessment made in Western Rajasthan (Thar) covering 19 million ha area which is the most densely populated desert region in the world. Agriculture which is the important source of livelihood for large number of poor small farm holders in India is very risk prone although, agriculture's contribution to the GDP is decreasing over time. Besides livestock, farmers traditionally diversify their activity mix with forestry and horticulture. It has been well proved by many studies that the introduction of suitable perennial component in arid farming systems not only enhances farm income and family nutrition but also its resilience under water scarcity. But it has not been promoted and adopted in systems perspective as a commercially viable model. Using this case study we analyze the potential economic benefits and suitability of such models under different resource situations. The examined models are integrated horticulture and agro-forestry with suitable species together with rainwater harvesting structures that significantly enhances farm income and resilience. The annual net returns on different farm types in arid region would increase in multiple folds. The results suggest the need for reorientation of the agricultural research for development agenda taking into consideration the existing and emerging abiotic stresses, and the development and dissemination of new impact pathway through integration and convergence to intertwine the technologies with enabling institutions, policies and financial instruments as a win-win proposition through business model.
    Keywords: Drylands, Farm typology, Potential benefits, Technology targeting, Resilience, Farm Management, Financial Economics,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165846&r=agr
  10. By: Kayser, Maike; Kroger, Rhena; Theuvsen, Ludwig
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, Public Economics,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166101&r=agr
  11. By: Heise, Heinke; Pirsich, Wiebke; Theuvsen, Ludwig
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166110&r=agr
  12. By: Songsermsawas, Tisorn; Baylis, Kathy; Chhatre, Ashwini
    Abstract: Using a unique dataset from a household survey containing explicit social relationships among individual farmers, this study estimate the effect of peers on the revenue from cash crop sales among small-scale farmers in Northern India. We explore the learning mechanism through which peer effect occurs through improved input use and higher degree of commercialization. The significant and positive peer effects support the evidence of social learning. We control for the reflection problem using the technique proposed by Bramoulle, Djebbari, and Fortin (2009). Additionally, the positive evidence of peer effects do not disappear when we alter the definition of peers.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics,
    Date: 2014–04–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166115&r=agr
  13. By: Grebitus, Carola; Roosen, Jutta; Seitz, Carolin
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:168232&r=agr
  14. By: Briggs, Adam; Chowdhury, Shyamal
    Abstract: This paper analyses food demand patterns of Indonesian households from a resource intensity perspective, and quantifies the impact of changed demand patterns on the use of three major resource inputs -fossil fuel, land and water – in agricultural production. 13 major food items are categorised into low, moderate and high resource intensity, and income elasticity and Engel curves are estimated for the period from 1997 to 2007. Additional resource use due to changes in demand is quantified by controlling for real expenditure growth over the study period as well as consumption and budget share changes. The results show that income growth in Indonesia is associated with demand patterns that are more resource intensive. Per capita requirements of fossil fuel, land and water increased by 3.13(MJ), 1.24(m2) and 2.1(KL) respectively relative to 1997 unit consumption levels. This study shows that at least for Indonesia, economic development will enhance challenges surrounding resource management, given the increased pressure on natural resource use resulting from food demand. The approach provides a useful foundation for further study into other developing countries similar to Indonesia in affirming connections between economic development and food demand that is more resource intensive.
    Keywords: demand analysis, economic development, natural resource management, Consumer/Household Economics,
    Date: 2014–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165808&r=agr
  15. By: Greiner, Romy
    Abstract: This paper reports results from a choice experiment conducted with pastoralists and graziers across Australia’s tropical savannas in 2013 (n=104). The experiment is designed to inform the question under what conditions are north Australian pastoralists and graziers willing to sign up to voluntary on-farm biodiversity conservation contracts? Results are presented of random parameter logit models of best-worst responses and first preferences, revealing the importance of and trade-offs between contract attributes, and preference heterogeneity. An extended latent class model is also presented to further explore heterogeneity of respondents’ preferences further. Discussion of the results in the context of the international literature is provided and policy implications are proposed.
    Keywords: Choice experiment, response format, efficient design, willingness to accept, farmers, on-farm biodiversity conservation, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165839&r=agr
  16. By: Liang, Chyi-Lyi (Kathleen); Pescatore, Matthew
    Abstract: There has been a growing interest in the U.S. to study local and regional food systems with respect to economic, social, and enterprise development. This paper discusses a series of on-going projects funded by the USDA focusing on two aspects of the relationships between social network and food choices – producers, and interactions between producers and consumers (buyers). Preliminary results showed distribution and opportunities for agricultural producers to exploit and implement new strategies that would enhance marketing and management by taking advantage of the capacity of social/economic networks in/around communities. Long-term goal on completion these studies will compare and contrast local, regional, and national approaches to design and implement effective marketing and management strategies that aim to promote local/regional food networks from social, economic, and ecological perspectives.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:168230&r=agr
  17. By: Marsh, Dan; Tucker, Steve; Doole, Graeme
    Abstract: Regional councils throughout New Zealand are in the process of drawing up plans to enable them to meet the requirements of the Resource Management Act and the National Policy Statement on freshwater. Some councils are working on targets for nutrient leaching at the catchment level and are considering alternative approaches to ensuring these targets are achieved. In this paper we investigate the farm level effects of agricultural policies by employing the methods of experimental economics to investigate alternative mechanisms for farm and catchment level regulations aimed at improving water quality. Results are presented for four cap and trade system designs in order to assess the effect of alternative approaches to allocation of nutrient discharge allowances and rules governing trade or exchange of these allowances. The objective of this study is to assess the utility of cap and trade systems through experimental economics, with a focus on the efficiency and equity of these mechanisms. Cap and trade systems are promoted as one of the major achievements of environmental economics. However, the move from theory to field implementation is a difficult transition, particularly due to the prevalence of uncertainty and the bounded cognitive ability of real agents. Data from the experiments enables comparison of the results of nutrient trading with the outcomes that would be expected based on economic theory. This assessment of the relative performance of cap and trade systems highlights important findings for environmental regulation. First, catchment profit is around 10% lower than predicted by theory. Second, the distribution of profit among farmers has little in common with that predicted by theory. Third, the trading behaviour of farmers bears little resemblance to theoretical predictions. Overall, these findings highlight the need to carefully assess the efficiency, equity and overall benefits of cap and trade systems for environmental regulation.
    Keywords: Cap and trade, environmental regulation, economic experiments, dairy farming, water quality, New Zealand, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2014–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:167195&r=agr
  18. By: Culas, Richard J.
    Abstract: The Australian wheat industry is an important contributor to the Australian economy and farm sector. This paper investigates the determinants of land use in wheat production for the Australian wheat-sheep zone. Land allocation between the wheat and the wool enterprises are considered in view of maximizing the expected farm profit. Wheat area supply response, is estimated across the wheat-sheep zone using data for the period 1990-2004. The statistical results indicate that the wheat growers in the Western Australia are more (relative expected) price responsive than the growers in the eastern states. Current wheat area is highly depended on the previous year’s wheat area and the area adjustment is also not significantly different between the regions. Estimates for the wheat own-price and the cross-price elasticities are with the expected signs and all less than unity, though the cross-price elasticities are more inelastic. Wheat yield is positively influenced by the area sown. Rainfall also has positive influence on the wheat yield but the time-related exogenous factors had only minor influence on the yield. The results are discussed in view of providing guidance for the decision on the land use. The paper also discusses the econometric approaches for analysing larger sample size (data).
    Keywords: wheat production, land use, relative prices, rainfall, supply analysis, Agricultural Finance, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165815&r=agr
  19. By: Morekhanova, Marina
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166106&r=agr
  20. By: Caswell, Julie A.; Boys, Kathryn
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165824&r=agr
  21. By: Ifft, Jennifer
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168413&r=agr
  22. By: Ruohong Cai (Princeton University); Shuaizhang Feng (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, , Chinese University of Hong Kong); Mariola Pytliková (VSB-Technical University Ostrava, KORA, The Danish Institute of Local Governmental Research); Michael Oppenheimer (Princeton University)
    Abstract: While there is considerable interest in understanding the climate-migration relationship, particularly in the context of concerns about global climatic change, little is known about underlying mechanisms. We analyze a unique and extensive set of panel data characterizing annual bilateral international migration flows from 163 origin countries to 42 OECD destination countries covering the last three decades. We find a positive and statistically significant relationship between temperature and international outmigration only in the most agriculture-dependent countries, consistent with the widely-documented adverse impact of temperature on agricultural productivity. In addition, migration flows to current major destinations are especially temperature-sensitive. Policies to address issues related to climate-induced international migration would be more effective if focused on the agriculture-dependent countries and especially people in those countries whose livelihoods depend on agriculture.
    Keywords: International migration, Climate variability, Agricultural productivity
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:crm:wpaper:1418&r=agr
  23. By: Lassoued, Rim; Hobbs, Jill E.
    Abstract: Given the credence nature of food quality and food safety attributes, consumers rely on abstract systems of regulation as well as quality signals such as brands to make informed choices. Motivated by the need to further investigate what influences consumer confidence in credence attributes, this paper develops a conceptual framework in which trust in the food system (i.e. government, farmers, manufacturers, and retailers) and brand trust are posited to influence public confidence in credence attributes. The proposition is tested using Structural Equation Modeling techniques based on survey data from a sample of Canadian consumers of fresh chicken meat and of packaged green salad. Survey results indicate that while both trust in the food system and brand trust are positively associated with consumer confidence in credence attributes, the influence of system trust on public confidence is more pronounced than the effect of trust in individual food brands. The effect of brand trust also appears to vary across product categories. The paper offers insights into the use of SEM to model the complexity underlying the determinants and outcomes of trust within food networks.
    Keywords: brand trust, structural equation modelling, food safety, food quality, chicken, salad, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166103&r=agr
  24. By: Adjemian, Michael; Janzen, Joseph; Carter, Colin; Smith, Aaron
    Abstract: In 2008, wheat futures prices spiked and then crashed along with prices for other agricultural and nonagricultural commodities. Market observers offered several theories to explain this common movement, or comovement, in prices, and have proposed policies to address the perceived problem of excessive price volatility. The design of an appropriate policy response would benefit from a better understanding of the cause of the observed price movements. This study uses an econometric model to decompose observed wheat prices into a set of economic factors and measure the relative contribution of each factor to observed price changes. Findings show that market-specific shocks related to supply and demand for wheat were the dominant cause of price spikes in the three U.S. wheat futures markets. Fluctuations in the global macroeconomy associated with broadbased demand shocks were relatively less significant for wheat than for other commodities like crude oil and corn. Finally, little evidence suggests commodity index trading contributed to recent price spikes.
    Keywords: Commodity prices, comovement, futures, index funds, speculation, wheat, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Demand and Price Analysis, Financial Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2014–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uersrr:167369&r=agr
  25. By: Dietz, Simon
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Security and Poverty,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165831&r=agr
  26. By: Gloy, Brent
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2014–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168341&r=agr
  27. By: Mireille Chiroleu-Assouline; Sebastien Roussel
    Abstract: According to several studies, agricultural carbon sequestration could be a relatively low cost opportunity to mitigate greenhouse gas concentrations. However the potential for storing additional carbon quantities in agricultural soils is critical, and depends on the past behavior of agricultural firms with regards to land heterogeneity. In this paper, we set incentive mechanisms to enhance carbon sequestration as a principalagent relationship between a regulator and agricultural firms. The potential for additional carbon sequestration is treated as an exhaustible resource, under the assumption that the sequestration costs increase with the amount of carbon already stored. We specify contracts in order to induce truthful revelation by firms regarding the characteristics of their intrinsic behaviour towards carbon sequestration, while analytically characterizing the optimal path to sequestering carbon as an exhaustable resource. Firstly, we take into account the impact of the co-effects on the sequestration path, due to carbon sequestering practices. Secondly, we show that incomplete information slows the sequestration process and increases the unexploited potential of carbon sequestration. Thirdly, our paper provides a sound basis for differentiated per-hectare subsidies, dynamically defined for the entire duration of the contract. A type-dependent participation constraint acknowledges the previous efforts of the farmers who have previously accepted policy to incur some sequestration costs, and this constraint prevents them from deciding to switch back to less sequestering practices. The proposed contract has the advantage of avoiding the inefficiency of per-hectare subsidies, as well as the excess costs of a uniform per-tonne subsidy. In addition, it does not penalize early adopters of practices with more intensive sequestration.
    Keywords: Agriculture, Carbon Sequestration, Hidden Information, Incentives, Land-use, Payment for Environmental Services (PES)
    JEL: D62 D82 H23 Q15 Q58
    Date: 2014–04–24
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:eus:ce3swp:0114&r=agr
  28. By: Pearson, Dr. David
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Security and Poverty,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165869&r=agr
  29. By: Jérémie Gignoux (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS : UMR8545 - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC) - École normale supérieure [ENS] - Paris - Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA), EEP-PSE - Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics - Ecole d'Économie de Paris); Karen Macours (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS : UMR8545 - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC) - École normale supérieure [ENS] - Paris - Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA), EEP-PSE - Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics - Ecole d'Économie de Paris); Liam Wren-Lewis (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS : UMR8545 - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC) - École normale supérieure [ENS] - Paris - Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA), EEP-PSE - Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics - Ecole d'Économie de Paris)
    Abstract: Investment in land administration projects is often considered key for agricultural productivity and rural development in developing countries. But the evidence on such interventions is remarkably mixed. This paper reviews the literature and discusses a number of challenges related to the analysis of the impacts of land administration programs, focusing on developing countries where the starting position is one of land administration systems based on the Napoleonic code, with existing individual rights that may be imperfect and insecure. We examine a set of conceptual and methodological challenges including : 1) a conceptual challenge related to the need to unbundle property rights and to establish the plausible causal chain for land administration interventions; 2) the existence of other binding constraints on productivity, implying the need to consider heterogeneities in policy impacts and the complementarity between property rights and other productive interventions; 3) the need to account for spillovers of land interventions on non-targeted households; and 4) methodological challenges related to the causal identification of the impacts of such interventions.
    Keywords: Land administration programs ; Property rights ; Agricultural productivity ; Rural development ; Impact evaluation methods
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-00992873&r=agr
  30. By: Monjardino, M; MacLeod, N.; Prestwidge, D.
    Abstract: The northern Australian beef industry accounts for approximately half of the national beef herd. It is currently challenged by a range of factors including decline in beef prices, limited live export trade, large farm debt levels, and low return on assets managed. Access to irrigation has been identified as one factor with potential to contribute to growth of the northern Australian beef industry. The development of irrigation for growing pasture and forage crops could extend the ability to sustain cattle through the dry season, a period when forage quality and quantity often limits cattle performance. We used a bio-economic model (Northern Australia Beef Systems Analyser) to investigate the farm-scale impacts of integrating forage crops into an existing cattle breeding operation in the Gilbert catchment of north Queensland. We assessed the feasibility of a range of forage crop types and irrigated areas with consideration of the capital costs of irrigation investment, price movements, and water reliability. This analysis highlights some of the key conditions under which beef producers are likely to benefit from an irrigation development at the farm scale.
    Keywords: irrigation, tropical systems, bio-economic modelling, NABSA model, FGARA project, Gilbert catchment, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2014–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:167112&r=agr
  31. By: Permani, Risti; Vanzetti, David
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty, Marketing, Political Economy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165882&r=agr
  32. By: Nedumaran, S.; Bantilan, Cynthia; Mason-D'Croz, Daniel; Singh, Piara
    Abstract: Most of the research evaluation and priority setting studies in the past are not likely to incorporate the cross-commodity effects in the estimation of welfare benefits since the cross-price elasticities are often unavailable and cross-commodity spillovers of technologies may be difficult to estimate. This paper also illustrates how the multi-commodity framework is suitable in addressing longer term trends in quantifying future welfare gains and their implications for resource allocation for dryland crops namely sorghum and groundnuts. To address these gaps, this paper will highlight the application of multi-commodity partial equilibrium model called International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) to estimate the welfare benefits of sorghum and groundnuts research. The modelling framework also integrates crop modelling suite, hydrology model, climate models and welfare analysis. This model will endogenously estimate the changes in the production, consumption and prices due to adoption of new productivity enhancing technologies and also estimate the changes in the other commodities demand, supply and prices through cross price elasticities effects. The returns to research investment for developing these promising cultivars and dissemination in the target countries were also estimated. The potential global net benefits derived from adoption of heat and drought tolerant cultivar in the target counties are about $302.39 million and $784.08 million with IRR of 30% and 41% respectively. The promising technology with combination of three traits (drought tolerance, heat tolerance and increased yield potential) will produce potential net benefits of $1.5 billion with IRR of 50%.
    Keywords: Multi-commodity model, technology evaluation, welfare benefits, Agricultural and Food Policy, Financial Economics, Political Economy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165879&r=agr
  33. By: Pavel Ciaian; d'Artis Kancs; Johan Swinnen
    Abstract: Decoupled direct payments were introduced in the EU in form of the Single Payment Scheme (SPS) in 2005. The 2013 CAP reform changed both the implementation of the SPS and its budget. We assess the possible effects of the 2013 CAP reform on EU land markets; in particular the capitalization of the SPS in land rental values. Our analyses suggest that the implementation details of the 2013 CAP reform will largely determine the impact of the SPS on land markets. The key ones are the reference period for entitlement allocation, regionalization, payment differentiation and budgetary changes. Our analysis also implies that a number of relatively minor policy changes could have substantial impacts on land markets.
    Keywords: Capitalization, decoupled subsidies, CAP reform, land market, land prices.
    JEL: H22 L11 Q11 Q12 Q15 Q18 P32 R12
    Date: 2014–03–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:eei:rpaper:eeri_rp_2014_07&r=agr
  34. By: Diether Beuermann
    Abstract: We estimate the impact of access to information and communication technology on agricultural profitability and child labor among isolated villages in rural Peru. We exploit the timing of an intervention that provided at least one public (satellite) payphone to 6,296 villages that did not previously have communication services. Using a village level panel, we show that profitability increased by 19.7 percent. Moreover, this income shock translated into a reduction in the likelihood of child market and agricultural work of 14 and nine percentage points respectively. Overall, the evidence suggests a dominant income effect in the utilization of child labor.
    Keywords: Agriculture & Food Security, Production & Business Cycles, Youth & Children, Innovation, Labor, Information and communication technologies, Peru, child labor
    Date: 2013–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:82430&r=agr
  35. By: Federico Guerrero
    Abstract: Using data for all 2,454 municipalities of Mexico for the period 1980-2010, this paper analyzes the relationship between exposure to extreme temperatures and precipitation and death, as well as the relationship between severe weather and agricultural income and crop production in the country. It is found that extreme heat increases mortality, while the health effect of extreme cold is generally trivial. Precipitation extremes seem to affect the agricultural system, but their impact on mortality is ambiguous. More specifically, exchanging one day with a temperature of 16-18 °C for one day with temperatures higher than 30 °C increases the crude mortality rate by 0. 15 percentage points, a result robust to several model specifications. It is also found that the extreme heat effect on death is significantly more acute in rural regions, leading to increases of up to 0. 2 percentage points vis-à-vis a 0.07-point increase in urban areas. The timing of climate extremes is relevant: if a weather shock takes place during the agricultural growing season, the effects on mortality and agricultural output, productivity, prices, and crop yields are large and significant, but not so if such shocks occur during the non-growing season.
    Keywords: Climate Change, Agricultural research & extension, IDB-WP-391
    Date: 2013–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:80690&r=agr
  36. By: Dury, S.; Alpha, A.; Bichard, A.
    Abstract: Agricultural development status impact individual nutrition through food, health and care practices. Many recent studies are focused on the positive side of the impact pathways. However, in some cases, those interventions may have negative outcomes on nutrition. We explore those potential negative outcomes based on a review of scientific papers and institutional reports as well as expert interviews. We identify six categories of risks related to incomes, prices, types of products, women social status and workload, sanitary environment and inequalities. ....French Abstract : Les interventions de développement agricole affectent la nutrition des individus via l’alimentation, la santé et les pratiques de soin. Les chemins d’impact sont complexes et sont l’objet de nombreux travaux récents, essentiellement centrés sur les effets positifs. Néanmoins certaines interventions agricoles peuvent avoir, dans certains cas, des effets négatifs sur la nutrition. Cet article propose de les mettre en lumière à partir d’une revue de la littérature scientifique et institutionnelle ainsi que d’entretiens avec des experts. Six catégories de risques sont proposées, relatifs aux revenus, aux prix, à la nature des productions, au statut social et au travail des femmes, à l’environnement sanitaire et aux inégalités.
    Keywords: AGRICULTURE; NUTRITION; RISK; FOOD SECURITY; IMPACT PATHWAYS; SECURITE ALIMENTAIRE; CHEMINS D’IMPACT
    JEL: Q18 Q12 I15 O13 O22
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:umr:wpaper:201403&r=agr
  37. By: Conner Mullally; Alessandro Maffioli
    Abstract: Management is an important input into agricultural production, as it a determinant of the uptake and proper implementation of productive technologies and practices. While there is a large literature on evaluations of extension programs meant to improve management practices in agricultural development, there is no consensus on the extension modalities that are most effective. This paper adds to the literature on extension interventions by evaluating the Uruguayan Livestock Program (ULP), a publicly funded, privately delivered extension program designed to improve management practices among cattle breeders. Using an eight year panel constructed by combining data from the Uruguayan livestock traceability system with a registry of ULP participants, we place bounds on the impact of the program on production and sales of calves by ULP beneficiaries using inverse probability weights estimated using propensity scores for selection into the ULP and selection into the dataset. Results show that the ULP increased calf production by between 11.36 and 15.3 calves on average in 2009 and 2010 and increased calf sales minus purchases by 4.35 on average over the same time span. Internal rates of return suggest these are moderately sized economic impacts. We examine the aspects of the ULP's design that might account for its positive but modest effects.
    Keywords: Plant, animal, & food production, Agricultural research & extension, Impact evaluation, Management
    Date: 2014–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:83893&r=agr
  38. By: Goldman, David
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2014–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168343&r=agr
  39. By: Alexandros SARRIS (University of Athens)
    Abstract: The recent period of high and volatile world food commodity prices has spurred many discussions initiatives and proposals for market regulation and enhancements. This has been of particular concern to the Net Food Importing Developing Countries (NFIDCs), especially the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) among them. The paper suggests that the main concerns of these countries involve market unpredictability, uncertainty about contract enforcement in periods of crisis, and financial constraints in importing food staples. A review of the appropriate policies to deal with risks of NFIDCS reveals that there are several policies that have been proposed, which if implemented at international level could alleviate the concerns of NFIDCs. However, a review of actions and initiatives taken at the highest international levels reveals that while the rhetoric has been there, the actual actions and financing for them have been short of the objectives. On the other hand considerable legislative activity in the US and the EU has aimed at curbing excess speculation in derivatives markets under the assumption that these markets are the main cause of market upheavals, something, however, that has not been scientifically confirmed. It thus seems that there is still a lot to be done to insure NFIDCs against market food commodity market shocks and volatility.
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fdi:wpaper:1595&r=agr
  40. By: Galluzzo, Nicola
    Abstract: New information communication technology is a good opportunity to exchange information and to get feedback from customers shortening the traditional channel of social relationships. In different countries over the time there has been a significant growth of social interactions by social networks but in Italian farms internet and social networks are not so widespread. Anyway farmers specialized in certified quality food are more involved in using internet and social media with the purpose to increase their commercialization opportunities. The quantitative method of analysis has been pivotal to estimate the role of Italian farms in tackling the challenges of social network and internet. Summing up, social networks and internet may be the best chances to solve the sense of remoteness in rural areas in particular in Italy where the generational turn-over, by many initiatives financed by the Common Agricultural Policy both in 2000-2006 and also in 2007-2013, has been intense enough to develop a young generation of farmers highly sensitive in using social media and proud to be a part of these virtual communities.
    Keywords: Certified quality food, Kohonen map, multiple regression model, agro-tourism, rural diversification, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166100&r=agr
  41. By: Islam, Nazrul; Xayavong, Vilaphonh; Anderton, Lucy; Feldman, David
    Abstract: Since the mid-1970s the south-west of Australia has displayed a warming and drying trend in its climate. Using parametric and non-parametric methods this paper provides a decadal assessment of the profitability, productivity and productivity components of over 250 farms in the region. The farm panel data are detailed descriptions of the physical and financial characteristics of each farm business from 2002/3 to 2011/12, a period of challenging weather-years. This study yields insights about farm characteristics and management strategies that have weakened or strengthened farm viability over the decade. In spite of the climate challenges experienced in the region during that decade, a majority of farm businesses improved their productivity and profitability.
    Keywords: Agriculture, Climate change, Productivity, Profitability, Farm management, Financial Economics, Production Economics,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165842&r=agr
  42. By: Ariel BenYishay; A. Mushfiq Mobarak
    Abstract: Low adoption of agricultural technologies holds large productivity consequences for developing countries. Agricultural extension services counter information failures by deploying external agents to communicate with farmers. However, social networks are recognized as the most credible source of information about new technologies. We incorporate social learning in extension policy using a large-scale field experiment in which we communicate to farmers using different members of social networks. We show that communicator effort is susceptible to small performance incentives, and the social identity of the communicator influences learning and adoption. Farmers find communicators who face agricultural conditions and constraints most comparable to themselves to be the most persuasive. Incorporating communication dynamics can take the influential social learning literature in a more policy-relevant direction.
    JEL: O13 O33 Q16
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20139&r=agr
  43. By: Ash, Mark S.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168315&r=agr
  44. By: Chandana Maitra (School of Population Health, The University of Queensland); Prof. D.S Prasada Rao (School of Economics, The University of Queensland)
    Abstract: In recent years, the process of economic growth in the Indian economy has been characterized by a peculiar divergence between the indicators of poverty and those of food security – the paradox of rising undernutrition and declining poverty over time. Given above, an important question that arises is, whether there is something inherent in poverty that drives food insecurity or whether the two phenomena are independent. The answer to this question has important policy implication because it tells us, in targeting the poor anti-poverty policies might lose sight of the food insecure households, nested in apparently non-poor households. Against this backdrop, the present paper attempts to explore the relationship between poverty and food security in terms of an experience based measure of food security, using an urban cross section sample. The experiential measure is based on a food security scale which was constructed by adapting the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module (HFSSM) in a setting of 500 low income urban slum households in Kolkata, in 2010-11. Based on the scale, households were classified as highly food secure, marginally food secure and food insecure. The relationship between poverty and food security was then examined by applying a simultaneous ordered probit model, recognizing the possible endogeneity in the relationship. Results indicate that a poor household is likely to be more food insecure, given certain socioeconomic characteristics, with the policy implication that poverty alleviation measures would be effective in eliminating food insecurity. Apart from poverty, the other factors which significantly affect household food security status include household size and composition, gender and education level of the household head, indicating need for multi-pronged intervention in eliminating food insecurity.
    Date: 2014–04–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:qld:uq2004:512&r=agr
  45. By: Glauber, Joe
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2014–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168339&r=agr
  46. By: Meng, Ting; Florkowski, Wojciech J.; Sarpong, Daniel; Resurreccion, Anna V. A.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166089&r=agr
  47. By: Chau, Vu Ngoc; Cassells, Sue; Holland, John
    Abstract: Since the 1990s, Vietnam has made the transformation from being a net rice importer to becoming one of the world’s largest exporters of rice. In fact, Vietnamese farmers have been highly successful at increasing food production since the reformation (Doi moi) in 1986 so that by 2010, rice yields had more than doubled (General Statistics Office of Vietnam, 2012). However, Vietnam, because of its geographical location and characteristics, is highly vulnerable to natural disasters, with a World Bank report (2010) estimating that 59% of Vietnam’s total area and 71% of its population are susceptible to the impacts of tropical cyclones and floods. Furthermore, the regularity of extreme flood events during the last decade in central Vietnam has raised concern, with three flood classes, 1:10, 1:20 and 1:100-year floods occurring in Quang Nam province in 2004, 2009 and 2007, respectively (Institute of Geography, 2012; Institute of Water Resources Planning, 2011). In this study we use a three-stage approach to estimate the direct losses to rice production caused by 1:10, 1:20 and 1:100-year flood events in Quang Nam, central Vietnam. Firstly, utilising information from geo-spatial inundation maps together with the timing of the floods with respect to crop rotation, we calculate flood-depth susceptibility rates for rice crops. Secondly, we calculate the loss to rice production experienced under the three flood classes. Thirdly, using 2010 prices, cost-benefit analyses were conducted for rice production when impacted by the three flood classes. These include scenario (pessimistic, optimistic and likely) and sensitivity analyses. The estimated value of direct losses to rice production for 1:10, 1:20, and 1:100-year flood events were VND11billion, VND100 billion and VND121 billion, respectively. Benefit-cost ratios, already very low for subsistence rice farmers, are further eroded in years of extreme floods.
    Keywords: Flood damage, cost benefit analysis, inundation mapping., Environmental Economics and Policy, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165813&r=agr
  48. By: Yu Chen (University of Macau - University of Macau); Sylvie Démurger (GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - CNRS : UMR5824 - Université Lumière - Lyon II - École Normale Supérieure (ENS) - Lyon - PRES Université de Lyon - Université Jean Monnet - Saint-Etienne - Université Claude Bernard - Lyon I)
    Abstract: Despite the dramatic reduction of poverty in China over the past thirty-five years, poverty has not been fully eradicated in rural areas, and in the context of growing inequalities, it remains a national concern. This paper examines a local cash-for-work program launched in mountainous areas of Beijing municipality in December 2004, with a view to understanding both the challenges and achievements of pro-poor programs in China. Using original household survey data, we first highlight the fairly good targeting performance of the program towards the local poor. Second, participation equations provide evidence of increasing local income without crowding out local agricultural activities. Finally, a decomposition of household income inequality by source highlights the strongly equalizing effect of the program on peasants' income.
    Keywords: cash-for-work program; income source diversification; agricultural households; income inequality; China
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00993574&r=agr
  49. By: Orlowski, Jan Alexander Kazimierz
    Abstract: Agribusiness inherently encounters various risks. These include risks arising from producer behavior to those resulting from changing weather conditions. Rising scrutiny and deliberation on climate change/severity forecasts a progressively important need for yield risk mitigation tools. Such tools include financial markets and insurance schemes, with insurance taking the predominant role with regard to yield risk. Area Yield Insurance is one of several crop insurance schemes available in the US. AYI differentiates itself by releasing indemnities on an aggregate rather then individual level, thus reducing administrative costs and the impact of both moral hazard and adverse selection. As is the case with many forms of yield insurance, AYI requires excessive subsidization in its current form. This study primarily addresses effectiveness and benefits offered to Australian producers through AYI, as well viability and risk diversification opportunities.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2014–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:167124&r=agr
  50. By: Heinen, Suzanne
    Keywords: International Development, International Relations/Trade, Marketing,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168391&r=agr
  51. By: Bontems, Philippe; Nauges, Celine
    Keywords: Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165864&r=agr
  52. By: Mercedes Campi; Marco Duenas
    Abstract: This paper studies the eect of strengthening intellectual property rights (IPRs) after the signing of the TRIPS on agricultural trade and bilateral trade links, for the period 1995-2011. It uses data of agricultural exports and an index of intellectual property (IP) protection that considers specicities of this sector, for a set of 60 economies that allows to study possible divergent results for developed and developing countries. The estimates show that stronger IPRs systems aect negatively total exports and imports of agricultural products, especially for developing countries. At a more disaggregated level, we found heterogeneous results depending on the sub-sectors, but the correlation is negative for most of them. The eect on trade links was investigated using a gravity model and we found that an increase in the IP protection levels is expected to have ambiguous eects depending on the sub-sector and level of development of trading country partners. The increase of IP protection of the exporter and the importer was investigated separately and, in some cases, asymmetric eects were found.
    Keywords: Intellectual Property Rights; International Trade; Agriculture; Gravity Model
    Date: 2014–05–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2014/12&r=agr
  53. By: Morales, L. Emilio; Hoang, Nam; Griffith, Garry; Salcedo, Salomon
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165860&r=agr
  54. By: Wilfried Ehrenfeld; Frieder Kropfhäußer
    Abstract: The challenges facing the 21st century, presented by a growing global population, range from food security to sustainable energy supplies to the diminishing availability of fossil raw materials. An attempt to solve these problems is made by using the concept of bioeconomy. Plants, in particular, possess an important function in this context - they can be used either as a source of food or, in the form of biomass, for industrial or energy purposes. Linking industrial and agricultural research and production, bioeconomy provides growth potential, in particular in rural areas. The aim of this article is therefore to outline the status of plant-based bioeconomy in three states of Central Germany - Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia - and to compare this to German plant-based bioeconomy. We take an in-depth look at the different sectors and outline the industries involved, the location and age of the enterprises as well as the distribution of important NACE codes. In conclusion, we highlight the significant number of new or small enterprises and the high research and innovation rate of Central Germany. We also stress the future potential of Central German plant-based bioeconomy as well as the importance of a more plant-focusedview of the technology sector.
    Keywords: plant-based bioeconomy, Central Germany, renewable resources, research
    JEL: O13 Q01 Q16 Q55
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwh:dispap:7-14&r=agr
  55. By: Windle, Jill; Rolfe, John
    Abstract: Evaluating land use change in economic frameworks often requires non-market values to be assessed. However non-market valuation experiments can be sensitive to the way the trade offs are framed. The aim of the research reported in this paper was to examine the influence of varying the valuation scope and combination of attributes in a split sample choice experiment focused on assessing the impacts of increased mining activity (coal and coal seam gas) in the Surat Basin in southern Queensland, Australia. The region had traditionally been dominated by the agricultural sector. The survey was designed to assess the largely, but not exclusively, non-use values of a distant population (Brisbane (capital city) residents) for tradeoffs between positive and negative impacts, which incorporated economic, social and environmental issues. Four impact attributes were identified: A)local jobs in the mining sector; B) house prices in the non-mining sector; C) wage rates in the non-mining sector and, D) inspections and independent monitoring activity at coal seam gas mining sites (a proxy to address environmental concerns). The results indicate that varying the combination of attributes had a significant influence on preferences and welfare estimates, which varied across attributes and valuation formats,
    Keywords: Choice experiment, valuation scope, choice attributes, mining, impact assessment, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165888&r=agr
  56. By: Schilizzi, Steven; Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe
    Abstract: In order to maximize efficiency, should conversation contracts include incentive payments and also be put up for tender? This work uses laboratory experiments to investigate this question. We find that there exists an optimal share of performance payment which yields maximum total stewardship effort and expected environmental outcome. While cost-effectiveness is maximized with the totality of payments linked to outcomes, it comes at the cost of reduced participation. Tendering such contracts yields additional benefits in terms of effort extraction and cost-effectiveness, but these benefits rapidly decline with the share of performance payment. Combining high shares of performance payments with tendering runs the risk of falling far short of the environmental target.
    Keywords: Conservation tenders, auctions, incentive contracts, agricultural policy, market-based instruments, experimental economics, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, C92, D44, D82, D86, H57, Q24, Q28,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165873&r=agr
  57. By: Mathilde MAUREL (Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne CNRS - Université Paris 1); Zaneta KUBIK (FERDI)
    Abstract: We analyze whether Tanzanian households engage in internal migration as a response to weather-related shocks. Our findings confirm that climate shocks lead to a higher probability of migration by reducing agricultural yields, which in turn induces households to send their members away in order to spatially diversify their income. This effect is, however, low, since a 1% reduction in agricultural income induced by weather shock increases the probability of migration by 3% for an average household. What is more, such mechanism is valid only for households whose income is highly dependent on agriculture, but is not significant for diversified livelihoods.
    JEL: O13 Q54 R23
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fdi:wpaper:1593&r=agr
  58. By: Nmadu, Job N.; Simpa, James O.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165865&r=agr
  59. By: West, Gale E.; Cisse, Ismaelh Ahmed
    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to determine the socioeconomic factors that influence the behavior of adoption of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) by Quebec grain farmers. Using an econometric model of discrete choice, ordered logit model, the results show that majority of Quebec grain producers are practicing IPM. Seven explanatory variables, such as amount of IPM information received, lack of weed control knowledge, level of environmental concern, perception that IPM is an organic production, need for monetary incentives to adopt, numbers of years as a producer, education level appear to be the determinants of the producers' decision process. Nevertheless, there was a gap between those who believe they are practicing IPM and those who actually do. IPM is quite misunderstood; producers often equated it with organic production practices. Increased information campaigns are needed to teach appropriate IPM pest identification practices. In fact, producer organizations appear to be an ideal structure for increasing IPM information dissemination because of the level of trust shared among producers. Most producers worried that IPM practice might reduce yields; therefore, 75% believe that financial assistance is needed before they would more widely adopt IPM. Level of agricultural training plays a significant role in IPM adoption. The foundations of IPM practices should be taught as early as possible in existing agricultural education programs.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166088&r=agr
  60. By: Agneta Forslund; Alexandre Gohin; Chantal Le Mouël; Fabrice Levert
    Abstract: Available estimates of biofuel-induced land use change (LUC) and corresponding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions vary on a wide range while estimations obtained from each model are highly sensitive to certain assumptions and key parameter values. Available studies often suggest that biodiesel and ethanol and/or EU and US biofuels would lead to different LUC and GHG emissions but they don’t agree on the type and/or the origin of the biofuel which would induce the least LUC and GHG emissions. In this paper we investigate the reasons behind this feature. We show that the Armington modeling of trade flows, which is currently used in models, contributes to this pattern. Using both observed data and the partial equilibrium model MATSIM-LUCA, we show that LUC stemming from the development of biofuels is highly dependent on assumptions made on trade: the Integrated World Market (IWM) approach, which relies on the homogenous product assumption, tends to erase differences in estimates of induced LUC from biodiesel and ethanol and from EU and US biofuels as compared to the Armington approach, that postulates that product are differentiated according to their origin and thus less substitutable.
    Keywords: biofuel, LUC, model, Armington
    JEL: Q11 Q15 Q17 Q48
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rae:wpaper:201404&r=agr
  61. By: Plakias, Zoe
    Abstract: This paper uses publicly available data from the California Department of Pesticide Regulation to measure local and industry peer eects related to the adoption of blueberries as a crop among Cal- ifornia growers between the years 2001 and 2011. Geographic and inter-industry network analyses complement the econometric estimation and provide greater insight into the patterns of peer eects. I nd that industry peer eects (i.e. those connections to other growers through growing crops other than blueberries) have a positive and statistically signicant eect on the probability of adopting blueberries. Local eects play an important, though less consistent, role. The geographic and social network analyses corroborate these results and provide greater depth. Overall, the results suggest that both inter-industry and geographic eects are important, and much can be learned about adoption patterns and possible avenues for learning about the crop without conducting expensive and lengthy social network studies.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2014–04–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aajs14:166093&r=agr
  62. By: Hohenstein, William
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168401&r=agr
  63. By: Suprehatin; Umberger, Wendy J.; Yi, Dale; Stringer, Randy
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Financial Economics,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165878&r=agr
  64. By: Doan, Dung
    Abstract: Recent studies on income and nutrition suggest that income growth plays either a small or even a negative role in influencing diet quality in China, especially for low income households. Such arguments cast doubt on the conventional reliance on income as a policy tool to improve public health through better diets. They, however, have been drawn mostly from analysis of income effect on nutrient intakes and diet adequacy. No research has been done on how income affects diet diversity in China, despite its unambiguous health benefits. This paper tests if income growth improves diet diversity, and, thus, can enhance public health in China, using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey 2004-2009. For the first time, potential endogeneity of income, most likely due to omitted variables, is addressed in the estimation of income effect on diet diversity by instrumental variables. This study finds that, regardless of estimation methods, income effect is significant and positive, but diminishes along the income distribution and over time. When endogeneity of income is controlled in 2SLS estimation, estimated income effect is considerably larger than the corresponding OLS estimate. OLS regression shows that education has significant and positive effects on diet diversity, with larger effects at higher education levels. Nevertheless, education effects diminish in terms of both magnitude and statistical significance in the 2SLS estimation. The stark differences between OLS and 2SLS estimates suggest that it is important to account for endogeneity of income. The OLS estimation seemingly understates income effects and overstates education effects. It, therefore, might mislead resource allocation in designing food and health policies.
    Keywords: nutrition, diet diversity, health economics, income, endogeneity, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, I10, I15, D12, C12,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165836&r=agr
  65. By: Yoeu, Asikin; Pillot, Didier; Salles, Jean-Michael; Neang, Malyne
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165891&r=agr
  66. By: Mohammad Alauddin (School of Economics, The University of Queensland); Upali A. Amarasinghe (International Water Management Institute, Patancheru); Bharat R. Sharma (International Water Management Institute, New Delhi)
    Abstract: The bulk of the water productivity (WP) literature has focused on static cross-sectional analysis with inadequate attention given to long-term, time series analysis, either at the country level or at a lower level of aggregation (e.g., district). The present study fills this gap by analyzing WP in Bangladesh using panel data of 21 districts over 37 years (1968–2004) divided into three phases. It estimated levels of, and trends in, WPs of one irrigated rice (rabi) crop, and two mainly rain-fed (kharif ) rice crops, with occasional supplementary irrigation. Also examined were WPs for rice crops in irrigated and rain-fed ecosystems. The findings indicated that WP levels in Bangladesh were significantly lower than that by global standards. Overall, WP growth rates varied significantly among districts and between phases with no consistent pattern emerging. On the whole, WPs trended upwards while differing widely among districts and between phases, seasons, ecosystems and areas differentiated by physiographic characteristics. The 1980s represented a period of stagnation. Drought-prone areas grew faster while salinity-prone areas grew slower vis-a-vis non-drought and non-saline areas. In the Ganges-dependent area, WP grew faster than that in the non-Ganges-dependent area. Rice production in Bangladesh represented a highly groundwater-dependent and fossil fuel-using process with significant environmental implications suggesting that WP growth may be unsustainable. Sustaining WP growth required a range of market and non-market-based policy options.
    Date: 2014–03–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:qld:uq2004:518&r=agr
  67. By: Orlowski, Jan Alexander Kazimierz
    Abstract: Area Yield Insurance (AYI) differentiates itself from the other more popular yield insurance schemes in its ability to reduce administrative costs, and decrease both adverse selection and moral hazard. These basic characteristics make AYI a candidate for considering a yield insurance scheme within Australia. This study simulates AYI indemnities and premium rates for five shires separated into two groups, based on geographical location. Through a set of coverage levels and farm yield variability, risk reduction and certainty equivalent measures are found. Adequacy of these measures are addressed though sensitivity analysis across a wide range of variables. Basis risk issues are confronted and brought to the forefront through correlation analysis of both acrossHshire and farmHshire yields. Results provide positive notions towards effectiveness in yield protection for Australian producers, however under the immobilizing assumption of government or external support.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2014–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:167122&r=agr
  68. By: Aurélien Dumont (Departamento de Geodinámica - Universidad Complutense de Madrid); Beatriz Mayor (Departamento de Geodinámica - Universidad Complutense de Madrid); Elena López-Gunn (Observatorio del Agua de la Fundación Botín - Université Complutense de Madrid - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid)
    Abstract: Improving the efficiency of water use is usually presented as an opportunity for large water savings, particularly in the agricultural sector. Warnings that this may not translate into reduced consumption is sometimes associated with the rebound effect or Jevons paradox, an appealing concept that can be used to analyse and prevent undesired consequences in the rush for efficiency gains. This article, based on the energy sector, shows that the concept helps to identify possible unintended consequences of increasing efficiency and shows how efficiency gains are shared in society. However, it might be conceptually misleading when applied to water since it reinforces a myth on the consideration of water savings and efficiency, and may be also too restrictive. The recent modernisation of irrigation practices in Spain highlights that the rebound effect is only one of many possible consequences of efficiency improvements.
    Keywords: irrigation; rebound effect; Jevons paradox; efficiency; return flows; modernisation; Spain
    Date: 2013–08–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00991778&r=agr
  69. By: Rello L., Carlos
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, International Development,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168429&r=agr
  70. By: O'Keeffe, Patrick
    Abstract: This research seeks to understand the impacts of the deregulation of export wheat marketing in Victoria’s western Wimmera. The dismantling of the single desk for wheat exports, operated by the Australian Wheat Board, was finalised in June 2008. In the five years since, no studies have specifically sought to understand from growers how they have been impacted by deregulation. This paper addresses this gap in the literature. To appreciate what these changes have meant, this research conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 wheat farmers based around the western Victorian town of Kaniva. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of these interviews revealed the growers were intensely opposed to the deregulation of the export wheat market. Fundamentally, this shift has resulted in growers having to market their own grain, ensuring that the success of their business was heavily reliant upon their effectiveness in an area in which they had no skills or experience. As a result, this research found that, firstly, growers cited financial costs as being the most significant impact of deregulation, and secondly, the impacts of deregulation were most intensely felt by farmers on properties of between 2,000 and 4,000 acres. In addition, participants in this study frequently described how this policy shift had left them politically disenfranchised.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Political Economy,
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aare14:165868&r=agr
  71. By: Jennings, Mark
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2014–02–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao14:168417&r=agr

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