nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2013‒08‒16
68 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
University of Verona

  1. EGNOS in Precision Agriculture: An affordable solution for a wide range of applications By Aguilera, Carmen
  2. Productivity growth in developed countries: Australia By Gooday, Peter
  3. Productivity in agriculture of Ukraine and other CIS By Slaston, Roman; Lissitsa, Alex
  4. U.S. Agricultural Productivity By Fuglie, Keith
  5. Evaluating Agricultural Productivity’s Impact on Food Security By Rada, Nicholas; Rosen, Stacey; Beckman, Jayson
  6. Factor Productivity & Factor Market Imperfections in EU Agriculture By Petrick, Martin
  7. Agricultural Productivity in China: Parametric Distance Function By Yu, Bingxin
  8. The Scramble for Natural Resources: More food, less land? By Anonymous
  9. Agricultural productivity: introductory comments By Haniotis, Tassos
  10. Meta-regression Analysis of Agricultural Productivity Studies By Karagiannis, Giannis
  11. Simulating the Value of Information Generated by On-farm Agronomic Experimentation Using Precision Agriculture Technology By Bullock, David S.
  12. The Sources of Measured Agricultural Productivity Growth By Chambers, Robert G.
  13. The influence of agricultural support on sale prices of French farmland: A comparison of different subsidies, accounting for the role of environmental and land regulations By Latruffe, Laure; Piet, Laurent; Dupraz, Pierre; Mouël, Chantal Le
  14. CAP Effects on Agricultural Investment Demand in Europe By Guastella, G.; Moro, D.; Sckokai, P.; Veneziani, M.
  15. Agricultural R&D and Productivity: Recent Trends and Emerging Implications By Alston, Julian
  16. The slumbering giant: land and water degradation By Noble, Andrew
  17. Convergence in Agricultural Productivity in the EU By Emvalomatis, Grigorios; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Stefanou, Spiro E.
  18. AGRICULTURE PRODUCTIVITY AND SUSTAINABILITY IN THE G20 By Tongeren, Frank van
  19. The impact of alternative input subsidy exit strategies on Malawi’s maize commodity market: By Mapila, Mariam A. T. J.
  20. Impact of post-2013 CAP reform on land markets: evidence from farm surveys and farm-level modelling By Viaggi, D.; Bartolini, F.; Puddu, M.; Raggi, M.
  21. Dynamics of transformation: Insights from an exploratory review of rice farming in the Kpong irrigation project: By Takeshima, Hiroyuki; Jimah, Kipo; Kolavalli, Shashidhara; Diao, Xinshen; Funk, Rebecca Lee
  22. Productivity in Emerging and Developing Countries BRAZIL By Jank, Marcos Sawaya
  23. Targeting technology to reduce poverty and conserve resources: Experimental delivery of laser land leveling to farmers in Uttar Pradesh, India: By Lybbert, Travis J.; Magnan, Nicholas; Spielman, David J.; Bhargava, Anil K.; Gulati, Kajal
  24. Agriculture and adaptation in Bangladesh: Current and projected impacts of climate change: By Thomas, Timothy S.; Mainuddin, Khandaker; Chiang, Catherine; Rahman, Aminur; Haque, Anwarul; Islam, Nazria; Quasem, Saad; Sun, Yun
  25. Agricultural Growth in India: Examining the Post-Green Revolution Transition By Rada, Nicholas
  26. Agricultural Labour Market Flexibility in the EU and Candidate Countries By Loughrey, Jason; Donnellan, Trevor; Hanrahan, Kevin; Hennessy, Thia
  27. Input-output concepts, profits and productivity growth: An application using Flemish farm level data By Yann, de Mey; Mark, Vancauteren; Steven, Van Passel
  28. Does Common Agricultural Policy Reduce Farm Labor Migration? A Panel Data Analysis Across EU Regions By Olper, Alessandro; Raimondi, Valentina; Cavicchioli, Daniele; Vigani, Mauro
  29. Typology of farm households and irrigation systems: Some evidence from Nigeria By Takeshima, Hiroyuki; Edeh, Hyacinth
  30. Productivity in Sub Saharan Africa By Torero, Maximo
  31. The Drivers and the Speed of Agricultural Intensification in Uganda By Mkhize, Hans P Binswanger; Savastano, Sara
  32. Agricultural Labour Productivity and the Intensity of Agri-food Trade in Selected Regional Trade Agreements By Nawrocka, Agnieszka Baer; Sapa, Agnieszka
  33. Trade Liberalization and Productivity Growth: A Recursive Dynamic CGE Analysis for Turkey By Dudu, Hasan; Cakmak, Erol H.
  34. Irrigation Technologies and the Limits of Water Productivity By Fereres, Elias
  35. Potential Technological Breakthroughs Concerning Productivity By Cerezo, Emilio Rodriguez
  36. What applications of nanotechnologies in food will impact global trade? By Kampers, Frans
  37. ROLE OF FERTILIZERS IN INCREASED AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY By Bain, Barrie
  38. A Random Matrix Theory Approach to Investigate Convergence in Time Series Data: An Application to Agricultural Labour Productivity By Surry, Yves; Galanopoulos, Konstantinos
  39. Measuring Food Supply Chain Performance By Cremaschi, Daniel Gaitán; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Meuwissen, Miranda
  40. Determinants to Leave Agriculture and Change Occupational Sector: Evidence from an Enlarged EU By Tocco, Barbara; Bailey, Alastair; Davidova, Sophia
  41. Gdyn-E: a dynamic CGE model for the economic assessment of long run climate policy alternatives By Antimiani, A.; Costantini, V.; Martini, C.; Tommasino, M.C.
  42. The heterogeneous effects of a food price crisis on child school enrollment and labor : evidence from Pakistan By Hou, Xiaohui; Hong, Seo Yeon
  43. Technical Efficiency in the Chilean Agribusiness Sector – a Stochastic Meta-Frontier Approach By Lakner, S.; Muñoz, T. Brenes; Aedo, Edinson Rivera; Brümmer, B.
  44. FIRM-LEVEL EVIDENCE OF DEADWEIGHT LOSS OF INVESTMENT SUPPORT POLICIES: A CASE STUDY OF DAIRY FARMS IN SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN By Michalek, Jerzy; Ciaian, Pavel; Kancs, d'Artis
  45. Trade, Import Competition and Productivity Growth In the Food Industry By Olper, Alessandro; Pacca, Lucia; Curzi, Daniele
  46. Comprehensive food security and vulnerability analysis: Nigeria: By Kuku, Oluyemisi; Mathiassen, Astrid; Wadhwa, Amit; Myles, Lucy; Ajibola, Akeem
  47. Understanding the role of research in the evolution of fertilizer policies in Malawi: By Johnson, Michael E.; Birner, Regina
  48. Forecasting Profitability By Mark Rosenzweig; christopher Udry
  49. Determinants of Farm Labour Use: A Comparison between Ireland and Italy By Loughrey, Jason; Hennessy, Thia; Hanrahan, Kevin; Donnellan, Trevor; Raimondi, Valentina; Olper, Alessandro
  50. The Caloric Costs of Culture: Evidence from Indian Migrants By David Atkin
  51. Quality Upgrading, Competition and Trade Policy: Evidence from the Agri-Food Sector By Curzi, Daniele; Raimondi, Valentina; Olper, Alessandro
  52. Food Spending in American Households, 1980-92 By Smallwood, David M.; Blisard, Noel; Blaylock, James R.; Lutz, Steven M.
  53. Demand for weather hedges in India: An empirical exploration of theoretical predictions: By Hill, Ruth Vargas; Robles, Miguel; Ceballos, Francisco
  54. Financialisation of Food Commodity Markets, Price Surge and Volatility: New Evidence By Kritika Mathur; Nidhi Kaicker; Raghav Gaiha; Katsushi S. Imai; Ganesh Thapa
  55. Rural wealth creation and emerging energy industries: lease and royalty payments to farm households and businesses By Jeremy G. Weber; Jason P. Brown; John Pender
  56. Per-Unit Duties: Friends or Foes of Developing Country Exporters? By Charlotte Emlinger; Houssein Guimbard
  57. The Capitalization of Area Payment into Land Rental Prices: Evidence from Italy By Guastella, G.; Moro, D.; Sckokai, P.; Veneziani, M.
  58. Organizational and institutional issues in climate change adaptation and risk management: Insights from practitioners’ survey in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Mali By Ragasa, Catherine; Sun, Yan; Bryan, Elizabeth; Abate, Caroline; Atlaw, Alumu; Keita, Mahamadou Namori
  59. The Role of Intellectual Property Rights in Seed Technology Transfer through Trade – Evidence from U.S. Field Crop Seed Exports By Zhou, Minyu; Sheldon, Ian
  60. The Contribution of Productivity Growth to Net Farm Income in Canada and the United States By Cahill, Sean A.
  61. Analysis of transportation and logistics processes for soybeans in Brazil By Fliehr, Olivia
  62. An analysis of commodity markets: What gain for investors? By Paresh Kumar Narayan; Seema Narayan; Susan S Sharma
  63. Measuring productivity change using alternative input–output concepts: A farm level application using FADN data By Yann, de Mey; Mark, Vancauteren; Frankwin, van Winsen; Erwin, Wauters; Ludwig, Lauwers; Steven, Van Passel
  64. The Role of Intellectual Property Rights in Seed Technology Transfer through Trade: Evidence from US Field Crop Exports By Zhou, Minyu; Sheldon, Ian
  65. An ex ante analysis of the impact and cost-effectiveness of biofortified high-provitamin A and high-iron banana in Uganda: By Fiedler, John L.; Kilkuwe, Enoch M.; Birol, Ekin
  66. Does it matter how much your neighbor owns? Looking at the functioning of land markets in Poland from the social comparisons’ perspective By Fałkows, Jan
  67. CAP Subsidies and Productivity of EU Farms By Rizov, Marian; Pokrivcak, Ján; Ciaian, Pavel
  68. The impact of EU sugar quota removal on EU external trade in sugar: a bilateral perspective By Burrell, A.; Doorslaer, B. Van; Ciaian, P.; Salputra, G.

  1. By: Aguilera, Carmen
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152251&r=agr
  2. By: Gooday, Peter
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development, International Relations/Trade, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152338&r=agr
  3. By: Slaston, Roman; Lissitsa, Alex
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, International Relations/Trade, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152350&r=agr
  4. By: Fuglie, Keith
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152336&r=agr
  5. By: Rada, Nicholas; Rosen, Stacey; Beckman, Jayson
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152267&r=agr
  6. By: Petrick, Martin
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152337&r=agr
  7. By: Yu, Bingxin
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152347&r=agr
  8. By: Anonymous
    Abstract: Proceedings of the 2012 Parliamentary Conference, with Sir John Beddington; Professor Jonathon Foley; Dr Derek Byerlee; Dr Frank Rijsberman and others
    Keywords: Food security, agriculture, natural resources, urbanisation, Malthus, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, International Development, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2013–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:cfcp12:152131&r=agr
  9. By: Haniotis, Tassos
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Productivity Analysis, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152333&r=agr
  10. By: Karagiannis, Giannis
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152262&r=agr
  11. By: Bullock, David S.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152370&r=agr
  12. By: Chambers, Robert G.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152392&r=agr
  13. By: Latruffe, Laure; Piet, Laurent; Dupraz, Pierre; Mouël, Chantal Le
    Abstract: We investigate the determinants of agricultural land price in several regions in France over the period 1994-2011 using individual plots transaction data, with a particular emphasis on agricultural subsidies and nitrate zoning regulations. We found a positive but relatively small capitalisation effect of the total subsidies per hectare. We found evidence that agricultural subsidies capitalised at least to some extent. However, the magnitude of such a capitalisation depends on the region considered, on the type of subsidy considered, and on the location of the plot in a nitrate surplus zone or not. Only land set-aside premiums significantly capitalise into land price, while single farm payments have a significant positive capitalisation impact only for plots located in a nitrate surplus zone.
    Keywords: Farm land price, agricultural subsidies, capitalisation, regulations, nitrate surplus area, France, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, International Development, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152372&r=agr
  14. By: Guastella, G.; Moro, D.; Sckokai, P.; Veneziani, M.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152256&r=agr
  15. By: Alston, Julian
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152335&r=agr
  16. By: Noble, Andrew
    Abstract: Who feeds the world? Two billion small-scale farmers who in addition to feeding themselves also produce surpluses for local markets — these are the food producers for a global population. Domestic markets along with the food consumed by the producers’ families constitute more than 70% of the world’s food consumption and are often overlooked in the food security debate. The importance of these producers to overall global food security is not in dispute, but can these farming systems continue to perform at current or improved levels, considering the influence of human-induced land and water degradation and associated effects on ecosystem services? Soil erosion, depletion of nutrients and soil organic matter, salinisation and surface and groundwater pollution are challenges that have confronted agricultural and urban communities for decades, and still do. Land degradation associated with inappropriate and unsustainable land use practices is estimated to affect 5–10 Mha annually; 34 Mha of global irrigated areas is affected by salinisation; it is estimated that 25% of global freshwater storage capacity will be lost in the next 25–50 years unless measures are taken to control sedimentation in reservoirs; approximately 2 Mt of waste is dumped into rivers, lakes and wetlands each day; and it is estimated that there are now 12,000 km3 of polluted water on the planet, a volume greater than the contents of the world’s ten biggest river basins. This litany of land and water degradation issues represents a diminished ability of ecosystems or landscapes to support functions and services required to sustain livelihoods. Small-scale farmers, the engine of global food supply, are the mainstay of most developing country rural economies and often occupy marginal and vulnerable lands. It makes sound economic sense to address this ‘slumbering giant’ of degradation through increased conservation investments in land and water resources within this sector. Whilst technologies, technology packages and management practices have been developed that demonstrate the practicalities of addressing these resource degradation issues, adoption at scale has been disappointing. Government institutions and development and research organisations are tasked with sustainably securing future food supplies. Their central challenge is to develop greater insights into constraints inhibiting adoption of productivity-enhancing and conserving interventions, and to identify the driving factors and relevant levers to address these constraints. Time may not be on our side in addressing land and water degradation, central to one of the nine thresholds that define ‘a safe operating space for humanity’.
    Keywords: International Development, Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2012–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:cfcp12:152413&r=agr
  17. By: Emvalomatis, Grigorios; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Stefanou, Spiro E.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152264&r=agr
  18. By: Tongeren, Frank van
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152334&r=agr
  19. By: Mapila, Mariam A. T. J.
    Abstract: This study has been conducted in order to generate evidence of the visibility of exit from farm input subsidies in an African context. The study simulates the impact of alternative exit strategies from Malawi’s farm input subsidy program on maize markets. The simulation is conducted using a multiequation partial equilibrium model of the national maize market, which is sequentially linked via a price-linkage equation to local rural maize markets. The model accounts for market imperfections prevailing in the country that arise from government price interventions. Findings show that some alternative exit strategies have negative and sustained impacts on maize yields, production, and acreage allocated to maize over the simulation period. Market prices rise steadily as a result of the implementation of different exit strategies. Despite higher maize prices, domestic maize consumption remains fairly stable, with a slow but increasing trend over the simulation period.
    Keywords: fertilizer subsidies, farm input allocation, subsidy reform, partial equilibrium model, Agricultural policies, maize,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1278&r=agr
  20. By: Viaggi, D.; Bartolini, F.; Puddu, M.; Raggi, M.
    Abstract: The connection between policy and other context variables and land markets is at the core of the policy debate, including the present reform of the Common Agricultural Policy. The objective if this paper is to evaluate the impact of the post 2013 CAP policy instruments on the land market in the Province of Bologna (Italy), based on a combination of survey and modelling information. Attention is particularly focused on the regionalization of payments and considers both potential reactions by individual farms and their interaction on the market. Modelling and survey information show a reaction of the land demand to the shift from the historical to the regionalised payments, with opposite reactions by different farms, hence incentives to adaptation through land markets exchange (rent). The regionalized payment seems to be more capitalized into the land value, at the margin, as long as it is less connected to entitlement. As a result, the regionalisation would cause increased rental prices. Survey information, however also reveals a major uncertainty by farmers in interpreting and devising an appropriate reaction to the expected reform.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Land Economics/Use, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152375&r=agr
  21. By: Takeshima, Hiroyuki; Jimah, Kipo; Kolavalli, Shashidhara; Diao, Xinshen; Funk, Rebecca Lee
    Abstract: Agriculture in African South of the Sahara (SSA) can be transformed if the right public support is provided at the initial stage, and it can sustain itself once the enabling environment is put in place. Successes are also specific to the location of projects. In Ghana, interesting insights are obtained from the successful Kpong Irrigation Project (KIP), contrasted with other major irrigation projects in the country. Through an exploratory review, we describe how a productive system evolved in KIP and how public support for critical aspects (accumulation of crop husbandry knowledge, selection and supply of profitable varieties, and mechanization of land preparation) might have created a productive environment that the private sector could enter and fill in the market for credit, processing, mechanization of harvesting, and other institutional voids that typically have constrained agricultural transformation in the rest of SSA.
    Keywords: agricultural transformation, agricultural profitability, Cultivation, Irrigation, Irrigation schemes, rice, Agricultural policies,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1272&r=agr
  22. By: Jank, Marcos Sawaya
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152341&r=agr
  23. By: Lybbert, Travis J.; Magnan, Nicholas; Spielman, David J.; Bhargava, Anil K.; Gulati, Kajal
    Abstract: Demand heterogeneity often makes it profitable for firms to price and promote goods and services differently in different market segments. When private consumption brings public benefits, this same heterogeneity can be used to target public subsidies. We explore the design of public–private targeting and segmentation strategies in the case of a resource-conserving agricultural technology in India. To understand farmers’ heterogeneous demand for laser land leveling (LLL), we conducted an experimental auction for LLL services with an integrated randomized controlled trial to estimate the private benefits of the technology. We use graphical and econometric approaches to characterize farmer demand for LLL. We then add detailed cost data from LLL providers to simulate and evaluate several potential targeted delivery strategies based on measures of (1) the cost-effectiveness of expanding LLL dissemination, (2) water savings, and (3) market surplus in a welfare framework. These simulations demonstrate inherent tradeoffs between increasing the amount of land that is leveled and expanding the number of farmers who adopt the technology, and between adoption and water savings. While segmenting and targeting are popular elements of many public–private partnerships to develop and disseminate agricultural technologies, formulating and implementing effective delivery strategies requires a rich understanding of costs, benefits, and demand. Our experimental approach generates such an understanding and may be relevant in other contexts.
    Keywords: conservation agriculture, resource management, demand heterogeneity, Market segmentation, Laser land leveling, technology targeting,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1274&r=agr
  24. By: Thomas, Timothy S.; Mainuddin, Khandaker; Chiang, Catherine; Rahman, Aminur; Haque, Anwarul; Islam, Nazria; Quasem, Saad; Sun, Yun
    Abstract: The goal of this research was to examine the likely impacts of climate change on agriculture in Bangladesh, and develop recommendations to policymakers to help farmers adapt to the changes. In this study, we use climate data from four general circulation models (GCMs) to evaluate the impact of climate change on agriculture in Bangladesh by 2050. We use the DSSAT (Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer) crop modeling software to evaluate crop yields, first for the 1950 to 2000 period (actual climate) and then for the climates given by the four GCMs for 2050. We evaluate crop yields at 1,789 different points in Bangladesh, using a grid composed of roughly 10 kilometer (km) squares, for 8 different crops in 2000 and 2050. For each crop, we search for the best cultivar (variety) at each square, rather than limiting our analysis to a single variety for all locations. We also search for the best planting month in each square. In addition, we explore potential gains in changing fertilizer levels and in using irrigation to compensate for rainfall changes. This analysis indicates that when practiced together, using cultivars better suited for climate change and adjusting planting dates can lessen the impacts of climate change on yields, especially for rice, and in some cases actually result in higher yields. In addition, the analysis shows that losses in yield due to climate change can be compensated for, for many crops, by increasing the availability of nitrogen in the soil.
    Keywords: Climate change, Impact model, Adaptation, Agricultural productivity, Crop yields, Varieties,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1281&r=agr
  25. By: Rada, Nicholas
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152343&r=agr
  26. By: Loughrey, Jason; Donnellan, Trevor; Hanrahan, Kevin; Hennessy, Thia
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Labor and Human Capital,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152330&r=agr
  27. By: Yann, de Mey; Mark, Vancauteren; Steven, Van Passel
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152365&r=agr
  28. By: Olper, Alessandro; Raimondi, Valentina; Cavicchioli, Daniele; Vigani, Mauro
    Abstract: The paper deals with the determinants of labour out-migration from agriculture across 149 EU regions over the 1990-2008 period. The central aim is to shed light on the role played by CAP payments on this important adjustment process. Using static and dynamic panel data estimators, we show that standard neo-classic drivers, like the relative income and the relative labour share, represent significant determinants of the inter-sectoral migration of agricultural labour. Overall, CAP payments contributed significantly to job creation in agriculture, although the magnitude of the economic effect was quite moderate. We also found that Pillar I subsidies exerted an effect approximately two times greater than that of Pillar II payments.
    Keywords: Out-farm Migration, Labour Markets, CAP Payments, Panel Data Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Labor and Human Capital, Q12, Q18, O13, J21, J43, J60,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152326&r=agr
  29. By: Takeshima, Hiroyuki; Edeh, Hyacinth
    Keywords: Irrigation, household models, Typology, households, Farm households, Farm household model, Cluster analysis, Living Standard Measurement Survey (LSMS), rice, Grain, Vegetable products, legumes,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1267&r=agr
  30. By: Torero, Maximo
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Labor and Human Capital, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152339&r=agr
  31. By: Mkhize, Hans P Binswanger; Savastano, Sara
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, International Development, International Relations/Trade, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152377&r=agr
  32. By: Nawrocka, Agnieszka Baer; Sapa, Agnieszka
    Abstract: A characteristic feature of contemporary world economy is the development of regional trade groupings in quantitative and qualitative aspects. The groupings have been formed for many years, but the intensification of this process has been particularly evident since the mid-90’s of previous century. One of the reason for formation of such groups is improving economic efficiency and welfare in the integrating countries. Regional trading blocs and the liberalization of trade flows among members may result in the intensification of intra-regional trade and the process of convergence, which can also reveals in relation to agricultural productivity increase. This in turn affects the growth of farmers' income and improve the international competitiveness of agriculture, which is especially important for the developing countries. The main aim of this paper is to answer the question whether within regional trade groupings convergence of agricultural productivity occurs, and whether this process is accompanied by increase in the intensity of intra-regional agri-food trade. In addition, authors try to find if the obtained results are related to the level of development of the member countries of the selected regional trading blocs. Topic of this paper comprise part of regional development economics, which is based on classical economics and is related to the international trade theory with the convergence concept (J. Tinbergen). According to this concept, formulated in the 40’s of the twentieth century, a result of free trade between developed and developing countries will level out economic wealth. To achieve such a state, active participation in the global economy and appropriate capital per worker in the developing countries is needed. Trade liberalization within a regional trading groups may be reflected into an increase in the productivity of production factors, including agriculture, although the empirical studies carried out do not give conclusive results. The analyzed groups are represented by North-North relations (EFTA), North – South relations (NAFTA) and South - South relations (MERCOSUR, EAC, CAN and CACM). Agricultural productivity will be measured by labor productivity in agriculture, although it doesn’t quite reflect the productivity of agriculture, but it is very important in the process of food production and the creation of agricultural income. For each regional trade agreement the coefficient σ convergence has been calculated and the convergence process has been evaluated. In order to verify σ convergence, the standard deviation of the log of agriculture value added per worker has been used. The analysis is based on data derived from World Development Indicators database and covers the period 1980-2010. Changes in the agri-food flows are measured by some indices: shares of intra-regional trade, intra-regional trade intensity index and symmetrical introversion trade indicator. Agri-food products are adopted in accordance with the SITC classification. Trade data come from the World Integrated Trade Solution database. On the basis of the conducted analyses it cannot be clearly stated that membership in regional trade agreement means the existence of the processes of convergence of agricultural labour productivity among countries constituting a particular grouping. What is more, in the analysed groupings it is difficult to indicate unambiguous similarities within agri-food trade, that accompany the identified convergence/divergence process or the development level of the member countries.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Relations/Trade, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152381&r=agr
  33. By: Dudu, Hasan; Cakmak, Erol H.
    Abstract: In this study, we analyze the effects of trade liberalization and productivity growth in agricultural activities on Turkey by using a dynamic CGE model calibrated to 2008 data. The simulation results suggest that Turkish economy is capable of accommodating the adverse effects of trade liberalization. There are significant welfare gains if trade liberalization is accompanied by the CAP payments in the accession scenario. Productivity increase in agri-food production by just decreasing food waste has prominent effects on welfare,trade and food security for the growing population.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152357&r=agr
  34. By: Fereres, Elias
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152353&r=agr
  35. By: Cerezo, Emilio Rodriguez
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152351&r=agr
  36. By: Kampers, Frans
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152248&r=agr
  37. By: Bain, Barrie
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152391&r=agr
  38. By: Surry, Yves; Galanopoulos, Konstantinos
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Labor and Human Capital, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152366&r=agr
  39. By: Cremaschi, Daniel Gaitán; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Meuwissen, Miranda
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152388&r=agr
  40. By: Tocco, Barbara; Bailey, Alastair; Davidova, Sophia
    Abstract: The objective of this paper is to explore the determinants to leave agriculture and change occupational sector. We adopt a 3-step multivariate probit where we control for selection bias at two stages in the decisions to work and, at a later stage, exit agriculture. The analysis is based on the European Union Labour Force Survey data expanded with additional regional indicators. The main results suggest that younger individuals are more likely to leave farming activities, although the largest outflows of agricultural labour are mainly associated with the retirement of people. Self-employed and family workers are generally less likely to leave agriculture and those with low levels of educations are found to be significantly constrained in entering the non-farm economy. Moreover, labour market conditions at the regional level do matter for switching occupational sector. Differences in the results among the selected NMS and the EU-15 can be explained by the diverse production structures, suggesting different capacities to release and absorb labour.
    Keywords: Agricultural Employment, Labour mobility, Sample Selection Bias, Agricultural and Food Policy, Labor and Human Capital, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, J24, J43, J62, Q12,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152324&r=agr
  41. By: Antimiani, A.; Costantini, V.; Martini, C.; Tommasino, M.C.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152272&r=agr
  42. By: Hou, Xiaohui; Hong, Seo Yeon
    Abstract: Using a panel survey, this paper investigates how the increase in food prices in Pakistan in 2008-2010 affected children's school enrollment and labor. The causal identification relies on geographical variations in the price of food (wheat). The results show that the negative impacts of food price increase on school enrollment differ by gender, economic status, and the presence of siblings. The negative effects on school do not directly correspond to the increase in child labor because the transition from being idle to labor activity or from school to being idle are significant, particularly among the poor girls. The results also show that children in households with access to agricultural land are not affected by higher food prices. The analyses reveal a more dynamic picture of the impact of food price increase on child status and contribute to broader policy discussion to mitigate the impact of crises on children's education.
    Keywords: Food&Beverage Industry,Markets and Market Access,Youth and Governance,Street Children,Primary Education
    Date: 2013–08–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6566&r=agr
  43. By: Lakner, S.; Muñoz, T. Brenes; Aedo, Edinson Rivera; Brümmer, B.
    Abstract: The Chilean economy is strongly export-oriented, which is also true for the Chilean agribusiness industry. This paper investigates the technical efficiency of the Chilean food processing industry between 2001 and 2007. We use a dataset from the 2,471 of firms in food processing industry. The observations are from the ‘Annual National Industrial Survey’. A stochastic meta-frontier approach is used in order to analyse the drivers of technical efficiency. We include variables capturing the effects of labour-quality, the extent of export orientation and the impact of paid subsidies to the agribusiness firms. Raw materials and labour have to largest impact on the output, but with a different input-intensity for the different agribusiness sectors. We could show that technical efficiency is different in the different agribusiness sectors and that some sectors (the bakery and the grain & mill sector) are using a more productive technology than the other sectors. Potential impacts on structural change in the Chilean food processing industry are discussed. The paper also shows, that exporting firms in the agribusiness industries can be described as more dynamic, achieving either a higher technical efficiency or a higher technological change.
    Keywords: Technical Efficiency, Stochastic Meta-Frontier Analysis, Food Processing Industry, Chile, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Relations/Trade, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, D24, G14, F14,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152356&r=agr
  44. By: Michalek, Jerzy; Ciaian, Pavel; Kancs, d'Artis
    Abstract: The main objective of the present study is to estimate the extent to which the RDP investment support has a complementary or a substitutionary effect on farm investments. In order to answer this question, we attempt to quantify the potential deadweight loss by estimating the extent to which the RDP beneficiaries would have undertaken comparable investments also without the investment support. We find that the deadweight loss of the RDP is close to 100%, implying that firm investment would have been undertaken also without the support. These results suggest that capital market distortions are not significant in Schleswig- Holstein. Similarly, no evidence was found that, due to programme support, farms would have brought forward their investments planned originally in a later period, suggesting no evidence of inter-temporal substitution of investments. These results are new, as the deadweight loss and its conditionality have not been studied in the context of the RDP in Germany before.
    Keywords: Rural development policies, investment subsidy, crowding out, substitution effects, additionality, subsidy leverage, deadweight loss, propensity score matching, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, International Relations/Trade, Public Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152257&r=agr
  45. By: Olper, Alessandro; Pacca, Lucia; Curzi, Daniele
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152385&r=agr
  46. By: Kuku, Oluyemisi; Mathiassen, Astrid; Wadhwa, Amit; Myles, Lucy; Ajibola, Akeem
    Abstract: The Nigerian Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (CFSVA) provides an in-depth assessment of the food security situation within Nigeria. This is very important as it equips policymakers with timely and relevant information that will aid the targeting of interventions.
    Keywords: food security, Vulnerability, Nutrition, Livelihoods, Development strategies,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1275&r=agr
  47. By: Johnson, Michael E.; Birner, Regina
    Abstract: This study examines the role of research in agricultural policy making in Malawi at a time when the Africa Union and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development have been seeking to promote greater evidenced-based decision making in agriculture. Drawing on both theory and actual past experiences documented in the literature, results are intended to improve our understanding of the extent to which research has played any role in influencing policy change in Malawi. This is done in the context of the evolution of the country’s fertilizer subsidy policies.
    Keywords: Policy process, Agricultural policy, Policy research, fertilizer, fertilizer policy, fertilizer subsidies, fertilizer subsidy,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1266&r=agr
  48. By: Mark Rosenzweig (Economic Growth Center, Yale University); christopher Udry (Economic Growth Center, Yale University)
    Abstract: We use newly-available Indian panel data to estimate how the returns to planting-stage investments vary by rainfall realizations. We show that the forecasts significantly affect farmer investment decisions and that these responses account for a substantial fraction of the inter-annual variability in planting-stage investments, that the skill of the forecasts varies across areas of India, and that farmers respond more strongly to the forecast where there is more forecast skill and not at all when there is no skill. We show, using an IV strategy in which the Indian government forecast of monsoon rainfall serves as the main instrument, that the return to agricultural investment depends substantially on the conditions under which it is estimated. Using the full rainfall distribution and our profit function estimates, we find that Indian farmers on average under-invest, by a factor of three, when we compare actual levels of investments to the optimal investment level that maximizes expected profits. Farmers who use skilled forecasts have increased average profit levels but also have more variable profits compared with farmers without access to forecasts. Even modest improvements in forecast skill would substantially increase average profits.
    Keywords: agriculture, forecasting, investment
    JEL: D24 D81 O12 O13 O14 Q12 Q54
    Date: 2013–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:egc:wpaper:1029&r=agr
  49. By: Loughrey, Jason; Hennessy, Thia; Hanrahan, Kevin; Donnellan, Trevor; Raimondi, Valentina; Olper, Alessandro
    Abstract: This paper examines the effect of the decoupling of farm direct payments upon the off-farm labour supply decisions of farmers in both Ireland and Italy. We use panel data from the Farm Business Survey (REA) and FADN database covering the period from 2002 to 2009 to model these decisions. Drawing from the conceptual agricultural household model, we hypothesise that the decoupling of direct payments led to an increase in off-farm labour activity despite some competing factors. This hypothesis rests largely upon the argument that the effects of changes in relative wages have dominated other factors. At a micro level, the decoupling induced decline in the farm wage relative to the non-farm wage ought to have provoked a greater incentive for off-farm labour supply. The main known competing argument is that decoupling introduced a new source of non-labour income i.e. a wealth effect. This may in turn have suppressed or eliminated the likelihood of increased off-farm labour supply for some farmers. For the purposes of comparative analysis, the Italian model utilises the data from the REA database instead of the FADN as the latter has a less than satisfactory coverage of labour issues. Both models are developed at a national level. We draw from the literature on female labour supply and use a sample selection corrected ordinary least squares model to examine both the decisions of off farm work participation and the decisions regarding the amount of time spent working off-farm. The preliminary results indicate that decoupling has not had a significant impact on off-farm labour supply in the case of Ireland but there appears to be a significantly negative relationship in the Italian case. It still remains the case in both countries that the wealth of the farmer is negatively correlated with the likelihood of off-farm employment.
    Keywords: Labour Supply, Off Farm Employment, Farm Holder, Italy, Ireland, Agribusiness, Farm Management, International Relations/Trade, Labor and Human Capital, J22, J43, Q12,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152331&r=agr
  50. By: David Atkin (Economic Growth Center, Yale University)
    Abstract: Anthropologists have long documented substantial and persistent differences across social groups in the preferences and taboos for particular foods. One natural question to ask is whether such food cultures matter in an economic sense. In particular, can culture constrain caloric intake and contribute to malnutrition? To answer this question, I first document that inter-state migrants within India consume fewer calories per Rupee of food expenditure compared to their non-migrant neighbors, even for households with very low caloric intake. I then form a chain of evidence in support of an explanation based on culture: that migrants make nutritionally-suboptimal food choices due to cultural preferences for the traditional foods of their origin states. First, I focus on the preferences themselves and document that migrants bring their origin-state food preferences with them when they migrate. Second, I link together the findings on caloric intake and preferences by showing that the gap in caloric intake between locals and migrants is related to the suitability and intensity of the migrants’ origin-state food preferences: the most adversely affected migrants (households in which both husband and wife migrated to a village where their origin-state preferences are unsuited to the local price vector) would consume 7 percent more calories if they possessed the same preferences as their neighbors.
    Keywords: Culture, Food Preferences, Migration, India, Nutrition
    JEL: I10 O10 Z10 D12
    Date: 2013–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:egc:wpaper:1028&r=agr
  51. By: Curzi, Daniele; Raimondi, Valentina; Olper, Alessandro
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Food Security and Poverty, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152387&r=agr
  52. By: Smallwood, David M.; Blisard, Noel; Blaylock, James R.; Lutz, Steven M.
    Abstract: Average annual food expenditures in urban households rose 59 percent from $985 per person in 1980 to $1,567 in 1992 While per person income rose 94 percent from $6,916 to $13,398. As a result, the percent of household income spent on food declined from 14.2 to 11.7 percent Annual spending per person for food consumed at home rose 55 percent from $667 to $1,036 While food consumed away from home lose 69 percent from $318 to $536. During this period, food prices rose 58.9 percent for total food, 54.8 percent for food at home, and 68.7 percent for food away from home. This bulletin presents information on trends in household food expenditures for major food groups by selected demographic factors for 1980-92. Information is also presented on household income and food price trends. The data are from the 1980-92 Consumer Expenditure Diruy Surveys prepared by the Bureau' of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.
    Keywords: Food Expenditures, BLS Consumer Expenditure Diary Survey, socioeconomic characteristics, Consumer/Household Economics, Financial Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uerssb:154828&r=agr
  53. By: Hill, Ruth Vargas; Robles, Miguel; Ceballos, Francisco
    Abstract: This paper analyzes the demand for rainfall-based weather hedges among farmers in rural India. We explore the predictions of a standard expected utility theory framework on the nature of demand for such products, in particular testing whether demand behaves as predicted with respect to price, the basis of the hedge, and risk aversion using data from a randomized control trial in which price and basis risk was varied for a series of hedging products offered to farmers. We find that demand behaves as predicted, with demand falling with price and basis risk, and appearing hump-shaped in risk aversion. Second, we analyze understanding of and demand for hedging products over time, examining the impact of increased investments in training on hedging products as well as evidence for learning by doing among farmers. We find evidence that suggests that learning by doing is more effective at increasing both understanding and demand.
    Keywords: index insurance, Economic theory, expected utility, weather index insurance, Risk, randomized experiment,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1280&r=agr
  54. By: Kritika Mathur (University of Delhi, India); Nidhi Kaicker (Ambedkar University Delhi, India); Raghav Gaiha (Department of Global Health and Population Studies, Harvard School of Public Health, USA); Katsushi S. Imai (Economics, School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester (UK) and RIEB, Kobe University (Japan)); Ganesh Thapa (International Fund for Agricultural Development, Rome, Italy)
    Abstract: Recent literature points towards the role of speculators in exaggerating the rally in food prices, over and above that explained by the fundamentals of demand and supply. Some studies argue that futures market speculation can only be blamed for the increasing food prices if it is accompanied by hoarding. With this background, the issues that the present chapter deals with are: (i) assessing the impact of indices such as S&P500, and MSCI on commodity prices; and (ii) tracing the volatility patterns in commodity prices, and linking volatility in commodity markets to these variables.Our results show a negative relationship between the commodity market returns and the Dollex, and a positive relationship between commodity market returns and crude oil price returns. The impact of equity markets, inflation and emerging market performance on commodity markets is weak. We also find some evidence of reverse causality or mutual endogeneity, for instance, causality from GSCI, S&P500 and WTI to MSCI, CPI to WTI, and MSCI, S&P500 to Dollex. We also study the causal relationships between the volatility of returns on macroeconomic variables and commodity markets, using the cross-correlation function, and Granger causality tests. Our results confirm unidirectional relationship from (volatilities of) GSCI to S&P500, from GSCI to MSCI, and from Dollex to GSCI. But there is also evidence of atwo-way causality between Inflation and GSCI (volatilities). Thus, the case for financialisation of commodity/food markets driving commodity/food returns and their volatility rests on weak foundations, leaving the door open for the pivotal role of supply-demand fundamentals.
    Keywords: Commodity Markets, Financialisation, Prices, Volatility, Speculation, Demand and Supply Fundamentals
    Date: 2013–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2013-22&r=agr
  55. By: Jeremy G. Weber; Jason P. Brown; John Pender
    Abstract: New technologies for accessing energy resources, changes in global energy markets, and government policies have encouraged growth in the natural gas and wind industries in the 2000s. The growth has offered new opportunities for wealth creation in many rural areas. At a local level, households who own land or mineral rights can benefit from energy development through lease and royalty payments. Using nationally-representative data on U.S. farms from 2011, we assess the consumption, investment, and wealth implications of the $2.3 billion in lease and royalty payments that energy companies paid to farm businesses. We estimate that the savings of current energy payments combined with the effect of payments on land values added $104,000 in wealth for the average recipient farm.
    Keywords: Consumption (Economics) - United States ; Households - Economic aspects ; Farms - Valuation
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fip:fedkrw:rwp2013-07&r=agr
  56. By: Charlotte Emlinger; Houssein Guimbard
    Abstract: Protectionist instruments such as tariffs can distort the prices of traded goods. This paper explores the impact of specific (per-unit) duties on patterns of agricultural trade. Specific duties may encourage countries to export higher priced products, leading to an “Alchian-Allen effect” on unit values. Their restrictive effect on trade values is smaller for developed compared to developing countries. It can be explained by the specialization of these countries on low-priced products and by the low level of quality differentiation among their exports. Our results highlight the discriminating nature of specific duties for low-income countries.
    Keywords: specific duties;agricultural trade;developing countries;trade unit values
    JEL: F13 F14 F15
    Date: 2013–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cii:cepidt:2013-23&r=agr
  57. By: Guastella, G.; Moro, D.; Sckokai, P.; Veneziani, M.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152263&r=agr
  58. By: Ragasa, Catherine; Sun, Yan; Bryan, Elizabeth; Abate, Caroline; Atlaw, Alumu; Keita, Mahamadou Namori
    Abstract: This report provides some reflections and insights on the level of awareness, practices, and organizational and institutional issues being faced by countries as they adapt to climate change, based on interviews with 87 practitioners working in government agencies, local organizations, international organizations, and think thanks reporting involvement in climate change adaptation. Data were collected in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Mali using both an e-survey platform and face-to-face interviews.
    Keywords: Climate change, analysis, Gender, Women, Risk, Resilience,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1279&r=agr
  59. By: Zhou, Minyu; Sheldon, Ian
    Abstract: To investigate whether intellectual property rights (IPRs) promote or hinder seed technology diffusion through trade, we use panel data for 134 countries over the period 1985-2010 to evaluate the impact of a country’s IPRs on its seed imports from the U.S. by estimating a gravity equation using both linear and nonlinear (Poisson) fixed effects methods. In both the static and dynamic models, the variable for WTO member countries that have implemented the TRIPs (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) agreement consistently shows a significantly positive effect on seed imports. We improve on previous studies by focusing on one type of planting seeds - field crop seeds, also accounting for status of growing genetically modified crops, and utilizing an estimation technique (Poisson) that is more viable in the handling of zero trade observations.
    Keywords: Intellectual property rights, seed trade, gravity equation, Crop Production/Industries, International Relations/Trade, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, F14, O34, Q17,
    Date: 2013–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152368&r=agr
  60. By: Cahill, Sean A.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, International Relations/Trade, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152367&r=agr
  61. By: Fliehr, Olivia
    Abstract: This study examines the relevance of Brazilian domestic transportation and logistics processes for agricultural bulk exports in terms of costs and CO2 emissions between farm gate and seaport, using the example of soybeans. To estimate the impact of logistics and transportation on the competitiveness of soybeans in a national comparison, export processes starting in four selected regions within the Sorriso-Santos corridor and travelling to the principal seaport for soybean exports in Santos-SP are evaluated. The analysis is based on agricultural statistics and data from field research as well as on information from expert interviews. Experts belong to the transportation and logistics sector, to the sector of agricultural production as well as to relating associations and research institutions. The results provide insight into the development and status quo of the domestic soybean market and infrastructure for transportation and storage of bulk materials. Structure and actors involved in the domestic supply chain are presented in a market analysis. A cost analysis elucidates a clear correlation of the export price (fob Santos) with the producer price (at the local spot market). The prices differ basically by the freight rates for domestic transportation. An impact assessment of CO2 emissions shows that rail transportation is in the specific cases not more efficient in terms of CO2 emissions than road transportation. This is due to a low utilization of the transport capacity on the train's return trips. The survey results also show the current bottlenecks and the potential and trends for the future development of the Brazilian logistics and transport sector for agricultural bulk products. The importance of efficient logistics and transportation processes for the competitiveness of soybeans on the international market is increasing with the relocation of the major soybean production areas into remote rural areas with underdeveloped infrastructure. The nationwide deficient network of transportation and storage infrastructure as well as of transshipment terminals leads to increased costs and capacity constraints. Monopoly-like structures and insufficient capacities in the regional rail system also exacerbate the problem of high freight rates. Recent public and private initiatives to improve the national infrastructure, particularly in the ports in northern Brazil, could lead to large improvements in the soybean logistics. -- In der vorliegenden Studie erfolgt eine Analyse der brasilianischen Logistik und des Inlandstransports für agrarische Schüttgüter am Beispiel von Sojabohnen. Um den Einfluss von Transport und Logistik auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der Sojaproduktion in Brasilien zu ermitteln, wurde eine Markt- und Kostenanalyse für vier Anbaugebiete im Sorriso-Santos-Korridor mit abnehmenden Transportdistanzen zum Hauptexporthafen von Soja in Santos-SP durchgeführt. Hierfür wurden agrarstatistische Daten sowie Ergebnisse von Befragungen unter Experten aus dem Transportund Logistiksektor, aus der landwirtschaftlichen Produktion sowie aus Verbänden und der Wissenschaft ausgewertet. Die Ergebnisse geben dabei Aufschluss über Entwicklung und Status quo des Sojamarktes und der inländischen Infrastruktur für Transport und Lagerung von Schüttgütern. In einer Marktanalyse werden Struktur und beteiligte Akteure der inländischen Lieferkette dargestellt. Eine Kostenanalyse verdeutlicht, dass ein klarer Zusammenhang von Hafenpreis (fob Santos) und Produzentenpreis (am lokalen Spotmarkt) besteht. Die Preise unterscheiden sich im Wesentlichen nur durch die Frachtraten. Eine CO2-Bilanzierung verdeutlicht, dass der Schienentransport aufgrund geringer Auslastungen der Transportkapazitäten auf den Rückfahrten gegenüber dem Straßentransport nicht emissionseffizienter ist. Die Umfrageergebnisse zeigen darüber hinaus die aktuellen Engpässe sowie weitere Potenziale und Tendenzen zur künftigen Entwicklung des brasilianischen Logistik- und Transportsektors für Agrarerzeugnisse auf. Als zweitgrößter Exporteur auf dem Weltmarkt gehört Brasilien zu den Hauptversorgern der weltweiten Sojanachfrage. Der Einfluss von Logistik und Transport auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit von Sojabohnen auf dem internationalen Markt nimmt durch die Verlagerung der Hauptanbaugebiete in küstenferne und infrastrukturarme ländliche Räume zu. Die allgemein defizitäre Infrastruktur von Transportnetz, Lager und Verladeterminals führt zu erhöhten Kosten und Kapazitätsengpässen. Monopolähnliche Strukturen und unzureichende Kapazitäten im regionalen Eisenbahnbetrieb verschärfen zudem das Problem hoher Frachtpreise. Investitionen in den Ausbau der Infrastruktur, besonders in den Häfen im nördlichen Brasilien, mit privaten und öffentlichen Mitteln versprechen eine deutliche Optimierung der Logistik.
    Keywords: Brazil,soybeans,infrastructure,logistics,transport,logistics costs,transportation costs,CO2-emissions,Brasilien,Soja,Infrastruktur,Logistik,Transport,Logistikkosten,Transportkosten,CO2-Emissionen
    JEL: Q13 Q17 Q50
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:jhtiwp:4&r=agr
  62. By: Paresh Kumar Narayan (Deakin University); Seema Narayan (RMIT); Susan S Sharma (Deakin University)
    Abstract: In this paper we study whether the commodity futures market predicts the commodity spot market. Using historical daily data on four commodities—oil, gold, platinum, and silver—we find that they do. We then show how investors can use this information on the futures market to devise trading strategies and make profits. In particular, dynamic trading strategies based on a mean-variance investor framework produce somewhat different results compared with those based on technical trading rules. Dynamic trading strategies suggest that all commodities are profitable and profits are dependent on structural breaks. The most recent global financial crisis marked a period in which commodity profits were the weakest.
    Keywords: Commodity Futures; Commodity Spot; Trading Strategies; Profits
    JEL: C22 G11 G17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:dkn:ecomet:fe_2013_02&r=agr
  63. By: Yann, de Mey; Mark, Vancauteren; Frankwin, van Winsen; Erwin, Wauters; Ludwig, Lauwers; Steven, Van Passel
    Abstract: Multifactor productivity growth measures can be constructed using different input–output concepts. We estimate three distinct productivity growth measures respectively based on gross output, value added, and cash flow and discuss their economic interpretation. By making use of an index theory based decomposition model, we deviate from making neo-classical assumptions and acknowledge the role of profits. Applying the productivity growth index framework to farm level Flemish FADN data (1990–2003), we show that the estimated percentage growth of productivity is sensitive to the input–output concept under consideration. The empirical practicability of these complementary productivity growth measures depends on the purpose of measurement.
    Keywords: Index, input–output, MFP, productivity analysis, profits, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, C43, D24, Q12,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152364&r=agr
  64. By: Zhou, Minyu; Sheldon, Ian
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, International Relations/Trade, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152369&r=agr
  65. By: Fiedler, John L.; Kilkuwe, Enoch M.; Birol, Ekin
    Abstract: Using the Ugandan National Household Survey of 2005/06, we analyzed the production and consumption patterns of highland cooking banana (nakinyika) and sweet banana (sukalindizi). Informed by the empirical findings, we developed geographically differentiated adoption, production, consumption, and diffusion patterns for several types of HPVAHIB. Based on households’ reported quantities of each type of banana currently consumed, we estimated the number of people consuming each banana and the quantities they consume, and then simulated the additional intakes of vitamin A and iron and estimated the number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) saved attributable to each.
    Keywords: Nutrition, Biofortification, cost benefit analysis, Vitamin A, banana, Micronutrients, Vitamin A deficiency, Iron supplementation,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1277&r=agr
  66. By: Fałkows, Jan
    Keywords: International Development, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152374&r=agr
  67. By: Rizov, Marian; Pokrivcak, Ján; Ciaian, Pavel
    Keywords: Production Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152259&r=agr
  68. By: Burrell, A.; Doorslaer, B. Van; Ciaian, P.; Salputra, G.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iatr13:152362&r=agr

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