nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2013‒05‒22
forty-nine papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
University of Verona

  1. Farmer and Farm Worker Perceptions of Land Reform and Sustainable Agriculture in Tajikistan By World Bank
  2. Agricultural Sector Risk Assessment in Niger : Moving from Crisis Response to Long-Term Risk Management By World Bank
  3. Assessing the Carbon Benefits of Improved Land Management Technologies By Ademola Braimoh
  4. Review of Regulatory Monitoring System for Fortified Foods in Nepal By World Bank
  5. Intensification of Livestock Production Systems in the North West Region of Cameroon : A South-to-South Collaboration for Technology Transfer, The Tugi Silvopastoral Project By World Bank
  6. Innovative Training in Cocoa Agroforestry : The Farmer Field Schools of Nicaragua By Mary Lisbeth Gonzalez
  7. Enhancing the Role of Women in Water User Associations in Azerbaijan By R. Merkle; D. Meerbach; A. Akhmedova; M. Bagirzadeh; S. Dideron; L. Javazadeh; S. Rustamova
  8. The Double Dividend of Agricultural Trade Liberalization: Consistency between National Food Security and Gains from Trade By Nobuhiro Hosoe
  9. Responding to Higher and More Volatile World Food Prices By World Bank
  10. Towards More Equitable Land Governance in Vanuatu : Ensuring Fair Land Dealings for Customary Groups By Milena Stefanova; Raewyn Porter; Rod Nixon
  11. It’s All About Teamwork : Unlocking Opportunities for Agribusiness in Ukraine By Alberto Criscuolo; Shaela Rahman
  12. Fertilizer Subsidies and Food Self-sufficiency in Indonesia By Peter Warr; Arief Anshory Yusuf
  13. Testimony before the US-China Economic Security Review Commission: China's Agriculture Policy and US Access to China's Market By Dermot J. Hayes
  14. Lebanon : Country Water Sector Assistance Strategy, 2012-2016 By World Bank
  15. Strengthening Quality, Growth, and Performance in Agriculture Finance : Lessons from India By AgriFin
  16. Trade insulation as social protection By Do, Quy-Toan; Levchenko, Andrei A.; Ravallion, Martin
  17. Lao PDR - Mapping the Gender Dimensions of Trade : A Preliminary Exposition By World Bank
  18. Agricultural Potential, Rural Roads, and Farm Competitiveness in South Sudan By World Bank
  19. Climate Change and Agriculture in Latin America, 2020-2050 : Projected Impacts and Response to Adaptation Strategies By Erick C.M. Fernandes; Ayat Soliman; Roberto Confalonieri; Marcello Donatelli; Francesco Tubiello
  20. Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils By World Bank
  21. Zambia - Public Expenditure Review : Resource Allocations and Financial Flows in the Water Sector in Zambia By World Bank
  22. Review of World Bank Engagement in the Irrigation and Drainage Sector in Azerbaijan By World Bank
  23. A model of gendered production in colonial Africa and implications for development in the post-colonial period By Fofack, Hippolyte
  24. Pacific Islands - Fisheries sector engagement strategy By World Bank
  25. Agribusiness Indicators : Ghana By World Bank
  26. Water Supply and Sanitation in Kenya : Turning Finance into Services for 2015 and Beyond By World Bank
  27. Water Supply and Sanitation in Mozambique : Turning Finance into Services for 2015 and Beyond By World Bank
  28. Gender Dimensions of Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining : A Rapid Assessment Toolkit By Adriana Eftimie; Katherine Heller; John Strongman; Jennifer Hinton; Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt; Nellie Mutemeri
  29. Building a Line of Defense Against Climate Change : From Reactive Coping to Adaptive Capacity in China's Irrigated Agricultural Development By Bjorn Conrad; Qun Li
  30. Hidden Harvest : The Global Contribution of Capture Fisheries By World Bank
  31. Water Supply and Sanitation in Rwanda : Turning Finance into Services for 2015 and Beyond By World Bank
  32. Impacts of Financial, Food and Fuel Crisis on the Urban Poor By Judy L. Baker
  33. Using Public Food Grain Stocks to Enhance Food Security By World Bank
  34. Do Minimum Wage Laws Affect People Who Are Not Covered? Evidence from Documented and Undocumented, Hourly and Piece Rate Workers in U.S. Agriculture By Anita Alves Pena
  35. Linking Gender, Environment, and Poverty for Sustainable Development : A Synthesis Report on Ethiopia and Ghana By World Bank
  36. Forest, Trees, and Woodlands in Africa : An Action Plan for World Bank Engagement By Marjory-Anne Bromhead
  37. People, Pathogens and Our Planet : The Economics of One Health By World Bank
  38. The Future of Water in African Cities : Why Waste Water? Integrated Urban Water Management, Background Report By Jochen Echart; Kebreab Ghebremichael; Krishna Khatri; Harrison Mutikanga; Jotham Sempewo; Seneshaw Tsegaye; Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy
  39. The Future of Water in African Cities : Why Waste Water? Urban Access to Water Supply and Sanitation in Sub-Saharan Africa, Background Report By Carolina Dominguez Torres
  40. An Overview of (International) Large-Scale Land Transactions (LSLT) in the context of Food Security By Silvia Saravia Matus; Jacques Delincé; Sergio Gomez y Paloma
  41. Banana Production and Cooperatives in the Philippines By Katsumi Nozawa
  42. Agricultural Risk Management in the Caribbean : Lessons and Experiences, 2009-2012 By World Bank
  43. Plant breeding for an EU bio-based economy: The potential of public sector and public/private partnerships By Aad van Elsen; Alicia Ayerdi Gotor; Carmen di Vicente; Daniel Traon; Jacques Gennatas; Laurence Amat; Valeria Negri; Véronique Chable
  44. Costs and fairness of forest carbon sequestration in EU climate policy By Munnich Vass, Miriam; Elofsson, Katarina; Gren, Ing-Marie
  45. Why the Poor Have Many Children By Edita A. Tan; Katrina Dinglasan
  46. Using Credit Ratings to Improve Water Utility Access to Market Finance in Sub-Saharan Africa By Rajesh Advani
  47. Giffen behaviour in Irish famine markets: an empirical study By Charles Read
  48. What Have We Learned from Attempts to Introduce Green-Growth Policies? By OECD
  49. After the Tsunami : Women and Land Reforms in Aceh By World Bank

  1. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge & Information Systems Rural Development Knowledge & Information Systems Agriculture & Farming Systems Crops & Crop Management Systems Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Regional Economic Development Rural Development Agriculture
    Date: 2012–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11897&r=agr
  2. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems Rural Development Knowledge and Information Systems Livestock and Animal Husbandry Poverty Reduction - Rural Poverty Reduction Crops and Crop Management Systems Rural Development Agriculture
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:13260&r=agr
  3. By: Ademola Braimoh
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems Rural Development Knowledge and Information Systems Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Crops and Crop Management Systems Energy - Energy and Environment Rural Development Agriculture
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:10419&r=agr
  4. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Food and Nutrition Policy Food and Beverage Industry Agriculture - Food Security Health, Nutrition and Population - Nutrition Livestock and Animal Husbandry Industry
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12390&r=agr
  5. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems Livestock and Animal Husbandry Agriculture - Agricultural Research Crops and Crop Management Systems Environment - Wildlife Resources
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12653&r=agr
  6. By: Mary Lisbeth Gonzalez
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems Rural Development Knowledge and Information Systems Crops and Crop Management Systems Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Regional Economic Development Education - Primary Education Rural Development Agriculture
    Date: 2012–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:10052&r=agr
  7. By: R. Merkle; D. Meerbach; A. Akhmedova; M. Bagirzadeh; S. Dideron; L. Javazadeh; S. Rustamova
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems Gender - Gender and Development Rural Development Knowledge and Information Systems Water Resources - Irrigation and Drainage Water Resources - Water Use Rural Development Agriculture
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:13235&r=agr
  8. By: Nobuhiro Hosoe (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)
    Abstract: National food security is one of the main justifications used to oppose agricultural trade liberalization in Japan. Opponents of agricultural trade liberalization argue that because food supply is subject to various uncertainties, importation of cheap foods is too risky a policy. We used a Monte Carlo simulation to perform a computable general equilibrium analysis and investigated the impact of trade liberalization on national food security with random productivity shocks in four major crop markets, such as rice and wheat. Our results indicate that not only would the level of welfare be improved but also its fluctuations would be reduced by trade liberalization of rice, which shows almost perfect self-sufficiency, and by that of other crops whose supply depends heavily on importation. This double dividend would be obtained even when we focused on the cases of extremely poor crops yields.
    Date: 2013–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ngi:dpaper:13-02&r=agr
  9. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry Agriculture - Agribusiness Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Markets and Market Access Private Sector Development - Emerging Markets Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics Industry
    Date: 2012–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12950&r=agr
  10. By: Milena Stefanova; Raewyn Porter; Rod Nixon
    Keywords: Private Sector Development - Land and Real Estate Development Agricultural Knowledge & Information Systems Rural Development Knowledge & Information Systems Urban Development - Municipal Housing and Land Communities and Human Settlements - Real Estate Development Rural Development Agriculture
    Date: 2012–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11893&r=agr
  11. By: Alberto Criscuolo; Shaela Rahman
    Keywords: Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Investment and Investment Climate Private Sector Development - E-Business Social Protections and Labor - Labor Policies Food and Beverage Industry Crops and Crop Management Systems Industry Agriculture
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:10421&r=agr
  12. By: Peter Warr (Australian National University); Arief Anshory Yusuf (Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University)
    Abstract: Indonesia is a net importer of almost all of its staple foods. National self-sufficiency in food, especially the mainstaple, rice, is a core objective of economic policy. Poverty reduction is also a core policy objective. Since the 1970s, Indonesia has used agricultural input subsidies, especially on fertilizer, to stimulate agricultural production, largely in pursuit of its self-sufficiency goals. Recently, it has alsoused output protection, especially in rice, for the same purpose. This paper utilizes a multi-sectoral, multi-household general equilibrium model of the Indonesian economy to study the trade-offs between the goals of self-sufficiency and poverty reduction when two alternative means are used toachieve them: a fertilizer subsidy, on the one hand, and output protection, on the other. It does this by analyzing the aggregate and distributional effects of these two sets of policies and by comparing their effects with non-intervention. The analysis shows that, in terms of its effects on poverty, a fertilizer subsidy can be a more effective instrument for achieving the goal of rice self-sufficiency than final product import restrictions.
    Keywords: Indonesia, Fertilizer subsidies, Food self-sufficiency
    JEL: D58 I32 F14
    Date: 2013–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unp:wpaper:201309&r=agr
  13. By: Dermot J. Hayes (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD); Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI))
    Abstract: Testimony before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission on April 25, 2013, by Dermot Hayes, professor of Economics and Finance, Iowa State University. Testimony covers impacts on food demand from China's rising incomes and urbanization; the viability of China's attempt to remain self-sufficient in meat and key staple crop production under inherent supply constraints, and the possible technological- and policy-based measures they may pursue in regard of such constraints; and, the main challenges to US-China agricultural trade in the short, medium, and long term.
    Date: 2013–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:fpaper:13-wp537&r=agr
  14. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Systems Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Water and Industry Water Resources - Water Conservation
    Date: 2012–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12622&r=agr
  15. By: AgriFin
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems Rural Development Knowledge and Information Systems Banks and Banking Reform Finance and Financial Sector Development - Debt Markets Finance and Financial Sector Development - Access to Finance Rural Development Agriculture
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12793&r=agr
  16. By: Do, Quy-Toan; Levchenko, Andrei A.; Ravallion, Martin
    Abstract: In a world with volatile food prices, countries have an incentive to shelter their populations from induced real income shocks. When some agents are net food producers while others are net consumers, there is scope for insurance between the two groups. A domestic social protection scheme would therefore transfer resources away from the former group to the latter in times of high food prices, and do the reverse otherwise. This paper shows that in the presence of consumer preference heterogeneity, implementing the optimal social protection policy can potentially induce higher food price volatility. Such policy indeed generates a counter-cyclical demand shock that amplifies the effects of the underlying food shortage. The results call for a reassessment of food stabilization policies. In particular, the authors urge caution against the systematic condemnation of trade insulation practices.
    Keywords: Food&Beverage Industry,Emerging Markets,Economic Theory&Research,Markets and Market Access,Food Security
    Date: 2013–05–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6448&r=agr
  17. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Gender - Gender and Development Agricultural Knowledge & Information Systems Rural Development Knowledge & Information Systems Health, Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Economic Theory and Research Rural Development Health, Nutrition and Population Macroeconomics and Economic Growth Agriculture
    Date: 2012–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11914&r=agr
  18. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Rural Development Knowledge & Information Systems Poverty Reduction - Rural Poverty Reduction Transport Economics Policy & Planning Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Regional Economic Development Rural Development - Regional Rural Development Transport
    Date: 2012–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11885&r=agr
  19. By: Erick C.M. Fernandes; Ayat Soliman; Roberto Confalonieri; Marcello Donatelli; Francesco Tubiello
    Keywords: Science and Technology Development - Science of Climate Change Agriculture - Climate Change and Agriculture Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Crops and Crop Management Systems Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12582&r=agr
  20. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Energy - Energy and Environment Environment - Carbon Policy and Trading Water Resources - Wetlands Environment - Environment and Energy Efficiency
    Date: 2012–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11868&r=agr
  21. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Systems Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Water and Industry Water Resources - Water Conservation
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12337&r=agr
  22. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Systems Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Wetlands Water Resources - Water Use
    Date: 2013–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:13234&r=agr
  23. By: Fofack, Hippolyte
    Abstract: This paper proposes a model to analyze the implications of colonial policies for gender inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa. The model emphasizes segmentation of production under complete specialization. It shows that the colonial production model, underpinned by occupational job segregation in the agricultural sector and gender bias in the non-agricultural sector, exacerbated gender inequality by limiting employment opportunities for women outside the realm of home production and subsistence agriculture. Over the past few decades, the resilience of parameters underlying these models of colonial production has heightened the risks of macroeconomic volatility in the region, especially where the structural transformation from low to high-value-added activities has remained elusive.
    Keywords: Economic Theory&Research,Labor Policies,Rural Development Knowledge&Information Systems,Gender and Development,Population Policies
    Date: 2013–05–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6438&r=agr
  24. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Resources - Oceans Environment - Coastal and Marine Environment Agriculture - Fisheries & Aquaculture Water Resources - Coastal and Marine Resources Environment - Environmental Economics & Policies
    Date: 2012–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:2730&r=agr
  25. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Agriculture - Fertilizers Crops and Crop Management Systems Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Markets and Market Access Transport Economics Policy and Planning Environmental Economics and Policies Environment Transport
    Date: 2012–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12893&r=agr
  26. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Systems Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Water and Industry Water Supply and Sanitation - Urban Water Supply and Sanitation
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12890&r=agr
  27. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Systems Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Water and Industry Water Supply and Sanitation - Urban Water Supply and Sanitation
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12888&r=agr
  28. By: Adriana Eftimie; Katherine Heller; John Strongman; Jennifer Hinton; Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt; Nellie Mutemeri
    Keywords: Gender - Gender and Development Agriculture - Agricultural Knowledge & Information Systems Industry - Mining & Extractive Industry (Non-Energy) Rural Development - Rural Development Knowledge & Information Systems Gender - Gender and Law
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:2731&r=agr
  29. By: Bjorn Conrad; Qun Li
    Keywords: Science and Technology Development - Science of Climate Change Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics Environment - Adaptation to Climate Change
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:10420&r=agr
  30. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Resources - Oceans Industry - Fishing Industry Environment - Coastal and Marine Environment Fisheries & Aquaculture Environment - Ecosystems and Natural Habitats Agriculture
    Date: 2012–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11873&r=agr
  31. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Water and Industry Water Supply and Sanitation - Hygiene Promotion and Social Marketing Water Supply and Sanitation - Urban Water Supply and Sanitation
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12891&r=agr
  32. By: Judy L. Baker
    Keywords: Health, Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Food and Beverage Industry Urban Development - Urban Poverty Poverty Reduction - Rural Poverty Reduction Transport Economics Policy and Planning Industry Transport
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:10067&r=agr
  33. By: World Bank
    Keywords: International Economics and Trade - Access to Markets Food & Beverage Industry Finance and Financial Sector Development - Debt Markets Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Markets and Market Access Private Sector Development - Emerging Markets Industry
    Date: 2012–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11878&r=agr
  34. By: Anita Alves Pena (Colorado State University)
    Abstract: While a stated goal of minimum wage increases is to benefit low-income workers, some employers are not obligated to provide at least minimum wages to all employees. U.S. farm employers comprise one of these groups. Employees of large farms and H2-A workers (temporary nonimmigrant workers lawfully admitted to perform temporary or seasonal agricultural services) are protected by minimum wage legislation, while other migrant workers (especially those who are paid piece rate) are exempt. Furthermore, U.S. agriculture is characterized by a large percentage of illegal migrants, and workers who are illegal may or may not receive wages above minimum levels. This paper presents a case study, drawing from agriculture, that examines if and how minimum wage laws affect uncovered workers. Analysis examines wages and hours worked as functions of federal and state minimum wages using data from a nationally and regionally representative survey of employed farm workers. Results suggest wage increases for both covered and uncovered workers, greatest gains to those who are formally covered, and gains not being at the expense of hours worked.
    Keywords: minimum wage exemptions, poverty, agriculture
    JEL: I32 J33 Q12
    Date: 2013–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:upj:weupjo:13-194&r=agr
  35. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Gender - Gender and Development Agriculture - Agricultural Knowledge & Information Systems Health, Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Finance and Financial Sector Development - Access to Finance Environment - Environmental Economics & Policies Health, Nutrition and Population
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:2725&r=agr
  36. By: Marjory-Anne Bromhead
    Keywords: Rural Development - Forestry Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Environmental Economics & Policies Environment - Wildlife Resources Environment - Climate Change and Environment
    Date: 2012–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11927&r=agr
  37. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Agricultural Knowledge & Information Systems Health Monitoring & Evaluation Disease Control & Prevention Livestock & Animal Husbandry Avian Flu Health, Nutrition and Population Agriculture
    Date: 2012–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11892&r=agr
  38. By: Jochen Echart; Kebreab Ghebremichael; Krishna Khatri; Harrison Mutikanga; Jotham Sempewo; Seneshaw Tsegaye; Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy
    Keywords: Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Systems Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Water and Industry Water Resources - Water Conservation
    Date: 2012–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12275&r=agr
  39. By: Carolina Dominguez Torres
    Keywords: Health, Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Systems Water Supply and Sanitation - Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Water Resources - Water and Industry
    Date: 2012–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:12276&r=agr
  40. By: Silvia Saravia Matus (Economic Consultant); Jacques Delincé (European Commission – JRC - IPTS); Sergio Gomez y Paloma (European Commission – JRC - IPTS)
    Abstract: The present report provides an overview of the scale, speed, drivers, key players and main expected consequences in terms of food security of the recent wave of (international) large-scale land transactions (LSLT´s) which has taken place at world level in the past years. This task is particularly challenging because a universal definition of what constitutes a ¨large¨ land investment as well as the potential advantages and disadvantages to all involved parties at different levels are not straightforward. Moreover, large-scale land transactions usually present different traits depending on the region in which they take place. Similarly, there is a wide range of investors with what appears to be (at first glance) rather different objectives. An added difficulty is related to the availability of reliable data (IFPRI, 2009). In order to overcome these obstacles, three basic steps were taken: i) Assess whether and how the wave of land deals is a new phenomenon, provide a working definition in order to identify actors and motives in both global and regional scenarios, ii) Understand why this new wave of LSLT´s emerged and establish a connection to food security challenges iii) Reflect on the theoretical and empirical consequences of LSLT´s at productivity, environmental and social level.
    Keywords: food security, large land scale transactions, international land scale transactions, land grabbing, economic development
    Date: 2013–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc81127&r=agr
  41. By: Katsumi Nozawa (School of Economics, University of the Philippines Diliman)
    Abstract: The socio-economic situation of small banana growers generated a lot of issues among researchers. However, the situation drastically changed because land distribution became possible through the Collective Certificate of Land Ownership (CLOA) issuance under the CARP. CLOA is issued to cooperatives composed of agrarian reform beneficiaries (ARBs). The contract growing scheme was simultaneously introduced as one of the schemes in the Agribusiness Venture Arrangement (AVA) to support CARP’s implementation. Under this framework, the Individual Farming System (IFS) is introduced wherein the grower owns all bananas he produced in his assigned lot giving him high incentives in his lot’s production. Thus, the IFS is the initial step in generating self-reliant growers. The paper concludes that strengthening the cooperative’s governability is essential in attaining the sustainability of the IFS.
    Keywords: agrarian reform beneficiaries, Agribusiness Venture Arrangement, banana production, Collective Certificate of Land Ownership Award, contract growing, cooperative, Individual Farming System
    Date: 2012–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phs:dpaper:201207&r=agr
  42. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Insurance and Risk Mitigation Urban Development - Hazard Risk Management Social Protections and Labor - Labor Policies Banks and Banking Reform Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics Finance and Financial Sector Development
    Date: 2012–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:13242&r=agr
  43. By: Aad van Elsen (Consultave – NL); Alicia Ayerdi Gotor (Institut Polytechnique LaSalle Beauvais –FR); Carmen di Vicente (Arcadia International – ES); Daniel Traon (Arcadia International – BE); Jacques Gennatas (Arcadia International – BE); Laurence Amat (Arcadia International – BE); Valeria Negri (UNIPG – IT); Véronique Chable (INRA - FR)
    Abstract: The JRC Scientific Policy Report provides the results of a study on "Plant Breeding for an EU bio-based economy 2020" which was carried out by Arcadia International in 2012. The study is based on a literature search, a workshop, interviews with experts and a survey directed at public breeding institutes. The first part of the study evaluates the breeding needs relevant for the biocenomy strategy 2020 for food, feed, biofuel and biochemical uses and to what extent they are covered by the private breeding sector. The second part of the study investigates the capacity of public breeding institutes to fulfill breeding needs where the private sector is not investing sufficiently. On the basis of the results of the study, the authors conclude that the capacity of public breeding in the EU is low and will not be able to fulfil the needs of the bioeconomy-strategy 2020 which are currently not covered by the private sector. In Member States (e.g. PL or RO) where public breeders are still relevant competitors on the market, institutes mainly focus on agronomic traits only. In the other Member States, institutes concentrate mainly on genomic and pre-breeding activities complementing the activities of the private sector in applied plant breeding.
    Keywords: breeding, bioeconomy, public breeding sector
    JEL: Q16
    Date: 2013–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc80822&r=agr
  44. By: Munnich Vass, Miriam (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences); Elofsson, Katarina (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences); Gren, Ing-Marie (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
    Abstract: Large emissions of greenhouse gases are expected to cause major environmental problems in the future. European policy makers have therefore declared that they aim to implement cost-efficient and fair policies to reduce carbon emissions. The purpose of this paper is to assess whether the cost of the EU policies for 2020 can be reduced through the inclusion of carbon sequestration as and abatement option while also equity is improved. The assessment is done by numerical calculations using a chance-constrained partial equilibrium model of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme and national effort-sharing targets, where forest sequestration is introduced as an uncertain abatement option. Fairness is evaluated by calculation of Gini-coefficients for six equity criteria to policy outcomes. The estimated Gini-coefficients range between 0.11 and 0.32 for the current policy, between 0.16 and 0.66 if sequestration is included and treated as certain, and between 0.19 and 0.38 when uncertainty about sequestration is taken into account and policy-makers wish to meet targets with at least 90 percent probability. The results show that fairness is reduced when sequestration is included and that the impact is larger when sequestration is treated as certain.
    Keywords: carbon sequestration; costs; fairness; EU climate policy
    JEL: D63 Q48 Q52 Q58
    Date: 2013–05–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:slueko:2013_005&r=agr
  45. By: Edita A. Tan (University of the Philippines School of Economics); Katrina Dinglasan
    Abstract: This is a follow up note on the UP School of Economics Faculty paper on the population issue. The poor who belong to the lowest two deciles of the income distribution have much higher actual and desired number of children, respectively 5.2 and 3.5. In contrast, the upper middle and higher income groups have less than 3 children which equal their desired number. It is argued that the poor who suffer serious deprivation in basic needs and see little opportunity for their children’s education and other opportunities feel little interest in controlling their family size. For them it would not matter how many children they may bear since the intensity of their poverty as measured by average income to poverty ratio and food consumption to subsistence ratio marginally improve as the number of children falls. It is suggested that for a family planning program to succeed, it must be part of an anti poverty strategy.
    Date: 2012–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:phs:dpaper:201217&r=agr
  46. By: Rajesh Advani
    Keywords: Infrastructure Economics and Finance - Private Participation in Infrastructure Finance and Financial Sector Development - Debt Markets Water Supply and Sanitation - Town Water Supply and Sanitation Finance and Financial Sector Development - Access to Finance Finance and Financial Sector Development - Bankruptcy and Resolution of Financial Distress
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:11681&r=agr
  47. By: Charles Read (Christ’s College, Cambridge)
    Abstract: There has been much contention among economists as to whether the potato in Irish markets during the Famine period is an example of a ‘Giffen’ good, but no price and quantity data from Ireland’s famine period has previously been unearthed to enable this to be systematically tested. Analysing high frequency price and quantity data for potatoes, wheat, barley, oats, and bacon pigs, collected from Cork market reports between 1842-49, this paper presents initial results which indicate that whilst potatoes, wheat, barley, and oats display normal characteristics during this period, the Cork markets for bacon pigs display some characteristics associated with Giffen-style behaviour. Further econometric analysis of the famine bacon pig market may therefore shed light upon the ‘Giffen’ phenomenon as well as market behaviour during famines.
    Keywords: Alfred Marshall, Robert Giffen, Giffen goods, Irish Famine, famine, potato, Ireland, Law of Demand, Microeconomic theory
    JEL: N00
    Date: 2013–05–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cmh:wpaper:15&r=agr
  48. By: OECD
    Abstract: Long-term projections suggest that without policy changes, the continuation of business-as-usual economic growth and development will have serious impacts on natural resources and the ecosystem services on which human well-being depends. This highlights the necessity for both developed and developing countries to move to a new growth path that is consistent with the protection of the environment and a sustainable use of scarce natural resources, while still achieving sizeable gains in living standards and reducing poverty...
    Date: 2013–03–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:oec:envddd:2013/2-en&r=agr
  49. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Culture and Development - Anthropology Urban Development - Urban Housing Rural Development Knowledge and Information Systems Gender - Gender and Law Rural Development - Common Property Resource Development
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:10064&r=agr

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