nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2012‒02‒08
fifty-five papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
University of Verona

  1. Analyzing Crop Revenue Safety Net Program Alternatives and Impacts on Producers and Program Costs By Jansen, Jim; Lubben, Bradley; Stockton, Matthew
  2. Impact of United States Corn-Based Ethanol Production on Land Use By Sobowale, Flakkeh; Dicks, Mike; Adam, Brian; Campiche, Jody
  3. Analysis of Participation in Multifunctional Agriculture: U.S. Rice Farms By Tur Cardona, Juan; Wailes, Eric; Dixon, Bruce; Danforth, Diana
  4. Food Expenditures in Rural Households in the Northern Region of Ghana By Meng, Ting; Florkowski, Wojciech J.; Kolavalii, Shashi; Ibrahim, Mohammed
  5. Fertilizer Demand for Biofuel and Cereal crop Production in the United States By Acheampong, Kwame; Dicks, Michael R.
  6. Innovation Systems and Technical Efficiency in Developing-Country Agriculture By Mekonnen, Dawit K.; Spielman, David J.; Fonsah, Greg
  7. The Impact of Precision Agriculture Techniques on Kentucky Grain Farmers' Carbon Footprint By Brown, Rachael M.; Dillon, Carl; Schieffer, Jack; Shockley, Jordan
  8. Impact of Climate Change on Agricultural Production in Asian Countries: Evidence from Panel Study By Lee, Jaehyuk; Nadolnyak, Denis; Hartarska, Valentina
  9. Potential Economic Effects of Post-CRP Land Management in Southwest North Dakota By Bangsund, Dean A.; Hodur, Nancy M.; Leistritz, F. Larry; Nudell, Dan
  10. Impact of Off-Farm Employment on Farmersâ Willingness to Grow Switchgrass and Miscanthus By Gedikoglu, Haluk
  11. Impact of the National School Lunch Program on Childrenâs Food Security By Gao, Xiang; Ishdorj, Ariun; Higgins, Lindsey
  12. Causative factors for changes in total factor productivity of Japanese agriculture under the era of climatic uncertainty By Kunimitsu, Yoji
  13. Water use efficiency and maximizing profitability of grain sorghum production in the Texas Panhandle By Ahamadou, Aly; Dembele, Mamadou; Almas, Lal K.; Brooks, Kathleen R.
  14. An Examination of How the Level of Yield Aggregation Impacts the Effectiveness of Area-based Insurance Designs By Wang, Yang; Barnett, Barry; Coble, Keith; Harri, Ardian
  15. The Impact of NAFTA on Agricultural Commodity Trade: A Partial Equilibrium Analysis. By Naanwaab, Cephas; Yeboah, Osei
  16. Risk and Nitrogen Application Decisions in Florida Potato Production By Asci, Serhat; Borisova, Tatiana; VanSickle, John J.; Zotarelli, Lincoln
  17. The Economic Value of the Precision Disease Management System for Anthracnose and Botrytis Fruit Rot for the Florida Strawberry Industry By Vorotnikova, Ekaterina; VanSickle, John; Borisova, Tatiana
  18. Accruals Anomaly in Agriculture Financial Economics By Arthur, Bruno; Katchova, Ani L.
  19. Assessing Korean Consumersâ Valuation for Domestic and Imported Rice: Importance of Country of Origin and Food Miles Information By Han, Doo Bong; Nayga, Rodolfo M. Jr; Lee, Ji Yong; Yoon, Jong Min
  20. Choice of Optimal Planting and Marketing Decisions for Fresh Vegetable Producers: A Mathematical Programming Approach By Vassalos, Michael; Dillon, Carl; Coolong, Tim
  21. Willingness to Pay for Imported Beef and Risk Perception: An application of Individual-Level Parameter By Lim, Kar Ho; Hu, Wuyang; Maynard, Leigh; Goddard, Ellen
  22. Disaggregation of Time in Household Food Production: Implications for the Goods-Time Elasticity of Substitution By Rudi, Jeta; Davis, George C.; You, Wen
  23. Analysis of Fruit Consumption in the U.S. with a Quadratic AIDS Model By Mekonnen, Dawit K.; Huang, Chung L.; Greg, Fonsah
  24. Feasibility Assessment of Biomass Harvesting Cooperative By Basnet, Arjun; Kenkel, Philip
  25. An Economic Valuation of Pollination Services in Georgia By Barfield, Ashley; Bergstrom, John; Ferreira, Susana
  26. Fragmentation of Agricultural Land Parcels By Neal, Kalyn; Doye, Damona; Brorsen, Wade
  27. Demographic Factors Affecting the Adoption of Multiple Value-Added Practices by Oklahoma Cow-Calf Producers By Williams, Brian; Raper, Kellie; DeVuyst, Eric; Peel, Derrell; Lalman, David; Richards, Chris; Doye, Damona
  28. What is the Difference in Profit per Acre between Organic and Conventional Coffee? By Jensen, Jennifer; Dicks, Mike
  29. Caribbean Food Import Demand: Influence of the Changing Dynamics of the Caribbean Economy By Walters, Lurleen; Jones, Keithly
  30. Production Profitability of Ethanol from Alternative Feedstocks in the Texas Panhandle By Almas, Lal K.; Lust, David G.; Brooks, Kathleen R.; Girase, J. R.
  31. Financing Constraints and Access to Credit in Post Crisis Environment: Evidence from New Farmers in Alabama By Hartarska, Valentina; Nadolnyak, Denis
  32. Derivatives at Agricultural Banks By Shen, Xuan; Hartarska, Valentina
  33. The Economics of Organic Versus Conventional Cow-calf Production By Gillespie, Jeffrey; Nehring, Richard
  34. Evaluating the Factors Influecing the Number of Visits to Farmers' Markets By Abello, Francisco J.; Palma, Marco A.; Anderson, David P.; Waller, Mark W.
  35. The Impact of Natural Amenity on Farmland Values: A Quantile Regression Approach By Uematsu, Hiroki; Mishra, Ashok K.
  36. Impacts of the U.S.-Central America-Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement - the Apple Case By Fu, Shengfei; Epperson, James E.; Ames, Glenn C. W.
  37. What Are the Consequences of United States Government Slaughter Policies on Horse Prices? By Vestal, Mallory K.; Lusk, Jayson L.; Cooper, Steven R.; Ward, Clement E.
  38. Analysis of Commodity Program Adjustments for U.S. Rice in Stochastic Framework By Chavez, Eddie; Wailes, Eric
  39. Structural Reforms and Agricultural Export Performance: An Empirical Analysis By Susanto, Dwi; Rosson, C. Parr; Costa, Rafael
  40. Economic Efficiency of U.S. Organic Versus Conventional Dairy Farms: Evidence from 2005 and 2010 By Nehring, Richard; Gillespie, Jeffrey; Hallahan, Charlie; Sauer, Johannes
  41. A Comparison of Consumer Willingness to Pay for Four Types of Sweeteners By Deng, Xueting; Saghaian, Sayed; Woods, Timothy
  42. Measuring the Stochastic Monetary Benefits of Multiple Inlet Irrigation in Arkansas Rice Production By Watkins, K. Bradley; Hristovska, Tatjana; Anders, Merle M.
  43. Factors Affecting Quality Grade Discounts for Fed Cattle By Hogan, Robert J. Jr.; Carlberg, Jared G.; Ward, Clement E.; Peel, Derrell S.
  44. Increasing Profitability of Small Scale Orchard Producers through Optimizing Replacement Rate: The Case Study of Ghana By Mahrizal; Nalley, Lanier; Dixon, Bruce; Popp, Jennie
  45. Foreign Direct Investments in Africa's Farmlands: Threat or Opportunity for Local Populations? By Sylvain Dessy; Gaston Gohou; Désiré Vencatachellum
  46. An Estimation of the Demand for Dried Distiller Grains by the Cattle Feeding Industry: A Combination of Survey Methods and Market Projections By Wright, Andrew P.; Mitchell, Donna; Hudson, Darren
  47. Managing Nitrogen and Phosphorus Nutrients for Switchgrass Produced for Bioenergy Feedstock in Phosphorus-Deficient Soil By Haque, Mohua; Biermacher, Jon T.; Kering, Maru K.; Gureztky, John A.
  48. Stochastic Frontier Analysis of Biological Agents (Microbial Inoculants) Input Usage in Apple Production By Chavez, Holcer; Nadolnyak, Denis; Kloepper, Joseph
  49. The âMade in USA poultry labelâ and consumer choice in Ghana By Egyir, Irene; Adu-Nyako, Kofi; Okafor, Ralph
  50. AT-HOME SEAFOOD CONSUMPTION IN KENTUCKY: A DOUBLE-HURDLE MODEL APPROACH By Wan, Wei; Hu, Wuyang
  51. HOW DOES HACCP CHANGE U.S. SEAFOOD EXPORTS?-ANALYSIS WITH FISHES, MOLLUSCA, AND SHELLFISH OTHER THAN MOLLUSCA By Li, Xiaoqian; Saghaian, Sayed
  52. Coffee Differentiation: Demand Analysis at Retail Level in the US Market By Alamo, Carmen I.; Malaga, Jaime
  53. U.S. Citrus Import Demand: Seasonality and Substitution By Baldwin, Katherine L.; Jones, Keithly G.
  54. Analysis of U.S. Demand for Imported Melons using a Dynamic Almost Ideal Demand System By Kaninda Tshikala, Sam; Fonsah, Greg
  55. Export Demand Function Estimation for U.S. Raisins By Soltani, Mohammad; Saghaian, Sayed

  1. By: Jansen, Jim; Lubben, Bradley; Stockton, Matthew
    Abstract: This study evaluates the policy effects of alternative program designs for federal revenue-based farm income safety net programs. Eight representative farms across Nebraska are used to stochastically simulate the financial impact of changing the current farm crop revenue-based safety net with a state revenue trigger against potential alternative programs involving guarantees at the district, county, or farm level. Results indicate that decreasing the aggregation of the revenue guarantee increases expected farm-level payments and program costs for the revenue-based safety net.
    Keywords: agricultural policy, farm bill, farm programs, government payments, representative farms, risk management, simulation, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty, Q12, Q18,
    Date: 2012–01–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119784&r=agr
  2. By: Sobowale, Flakkeh; Dicks, Mike; Adam, Brian; Campiche, Jody
    Abstract: This study measures the impact of corn-based ethanol production in the United States on land use in other countries, or indirect land use. Indirect land use is a change from non-cropland to cropland (e.g. deforestation) that may occur in response to increasing scarcity of cropland. As farmers worldwide respond to higher crop prices in order to maintain the global food supply and demand balance, pristine lands are cleared and converted to new cropland to replace the crops for feed and food that were diverted elsewhere to biofuel production. The results show that increasing ethanol production in the US has a positive and significant relation to U.S corn price. However, U.S. corn price does not have a significant impact on changes in corn acreage in Brazil and other countries such as Canada, Japan and China. Although many authors have hypothesized that increased ethanol production in the U.S. will increase corn prices, which will result in increased change in land use in other countries, these results suggest that the effect is minimal at best. This is important because although production of ethanol for fuel is often criticized for negatively impacting the environment because of indirect land use, this study was unable to prove the existence of indirect land use.
    Keywords: ethanol, indirect land use, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Land Economics/Use, Marketing,
    Date: 2012–01–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119800&r=agr
  3. By: Tur Cardona, Juan; Wailes, Eric; Dixon, Bruce; Danforth, Diana
    Abstract: Multifunctional agriculture is particularly fundamental to some working lands conservation policies and programs, such as the Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP), Conservation Security Program (CSP) and Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP). Farmers can also be engaged in providing recreational and agri-tourism services such as hunting, fishing, bird-watching, farm tours, petting zoos and hospitality services. Using the Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) we analyze factors associated with participation in conservation, recreation and agri-tourism activities as a function of farm structure, farm financial measures, production practices, and socio-demographic characteristics of the farm operator. To estimate the functional relationships we estimate a binary logistic model where the dependent variable takes a value equal to one if the farm operator reports in the ARMS survey participation in conservation programs, recreation or agritourism. Results show that the level of farm operator education and cultural practices that use conservation technical assistance are significant at the 0.01 and 0.10 levels, respectively, in explaining participation. Farm financial characteristics were not significant. Location (state where operator is located) is also not significant.
    Keywords: multifunctional agriculture, agri-environmental policy, rice, logistic model, Agricultural and Food Policy, Land Economics/Use, Q18, Q26, Q28,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119768&r=agr
  4. By: Meng, Ting; Florkowski, Wojciech J.; Kolavalii, Shashi; Ibrahim, Mohammed
    Abstract: The objective of the paper is to identify farmer and farm characteristics that determine the food expenditure in rural households in the Northern Region of Ghana. The results indicate income, implicit wealth, age, family structure, cultivation staple or cash crop, and buying dry goods in bulks are the major determinants.
    Keywords: Northern Ghana, Farm characteristics, Food expenditure, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119716&r=agr
  5. By: Acheampong, Kwame; Dicks, Michael R.
    Abstract: The emergence of biofuel production has impacted almost all sectors of the agricultural industry and the general economy and has produced a large body of research into how increased production of biofuels will impact the agricultural sector and the general economy. All research is in agreement that total biomass production will be required to increase to meet food and fuel demands. The increase in biomass will, of necessity, require increased use of fertilizers. Research on fertilizer demand has been scarce over the last decade. Because of the recent increase in the demand for grain crops and livestock in an era with little excess capacity in commodity production, the pressure to increase output will fall to increased use of fertilizers. In addition, there is some evidence of increasing scarcity in the principle macro nutrients (eg phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium). Thus, there is an urgent need to initiate research into the demand for fertilizers to determine the economic implications of expanded crop and livestock production. This analysis can provide crop producers and policy makers with important information on the role of nutrients in the economics of expanding uses for the major grain and forage crops. Most researchers have focused on total fertilizer (N.P.K) demand for total crop production which does not capture the effects of individual fertilizers on the individual crops. This study focuses on nitrogen demand for biofuel and cereal crop production and the impact on crop prices in the United States using the method of feasible generalized least squares (FGLS) estimation by weighted least squares regression. The results show that nitrogen fertilizer is very much responsive to corn price, wheat price, nitrogen price, phosphate price, and potash price. Results also indicate that increase in nitrogen price decreases nitrogen demand while increases in the price of corn, wheat, and other fertilizers increases the demand for nitrogen fertilizer.
    Keywords: Nitrogen demand, corn production, fertilizer prices, biofuel production., Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119798&r=agr
  6. By: Mekonnen, Dawit K.; Spielman, David J.; Fonsah, Greg
    Abstract: The paper uses a stochastic frontier analysis of production functions to estimate the level of technical efficiency in agriculture for a panel of 29 developing countries in Africa and Asia between 1994 and 2000. In addition, the paper examines how different components of an agricultural innovation system interact to determine the estimated technical inefficiencies. Results show that the mean level of technical efficiency among the sampled countries was about 86 percent, with some modest increases during the period in question. These results suggest that there is room for significant increases of production through reallocations of existing resources. Despite significant variation among countries, these results also indicate quite a number of least developed countries have high mean efficiency scores, implying a need to focus on investment that pushes the production frontier outward in these countries. Several measures of agricultural R&D achievement and intensity, along with educational enrollment, are found to enhance agricultural efficiency. On the other hand, countries with higher levels of official development assistance, foreign direct investment, and a greater share of land under irrigation are found to be performing poorly in their agricultural efficiency score.
    Keywords: agricultural innovation systems, technical efficiency, developing country agriculture, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty, International Development, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119788&r=agr
  7. By: Brown, Rachael M.; Dillon, Carl; Schieffer, Jack; Shockley, Jordan
    Abstract: This study estimates the carbon footprint of a Henderson County, Kentucky grain farmer under different production strategies; traditional farming and precision agriculture technologies. Four constrained optimization, whole farm analysis models were formulated under no-till conditions. One of the models was optimized without utilizing any precision agriculture techniques and was used as a base model to compare the other three models which incorporated precision agriculture technologies (PAT). The three technologies investigated include sub-meter auto-steer, RTK auto-steer and automatic section control (ASC). These models are used to analyze the different production systems to determine if said technologies increase expected net returns and enhance the carbon input:output ratio. Given the levels of anthropogenic greenhouse gases released by the agricultural sector, quantifying the potential reduction in these gases due to the adoption of PAT is essential in seeing exactly how PAT can alter the impacts to the environment. The results show that all precision agriculture techniques produce a Pareto improvement over the base model. Specifically, automatic section control gave the greatest improvement with a mean net return that was 0.59% over the base. RTK provided the most significant enhancement in the carbon ratio with an improvement of 2.42% over the base model. All of these improvements over the base scenario can to the adoption of precision agriculture technology.
    Keywords: Resource and Environmental Economics, Production Economics, Precision Agriculture, Farm Management, Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119802&r=agr
  8. By: Lee, Jaehyuk; Nadolnyak, Denis; Hartarska, Valentina
    Abstract: We analyze the impact of climate change on agricultural production in 13 Asian countries for 1998-2007 estimating country-level FE panel model using climate variables. Higher summer temperature and rainfall increase production, higher fall temperature decreases it in Southeast Asia, and increase in annual temperature decreases agricultural production in Asian countries.
    Keywords: climate change, production, food security, Asia, Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Production Economics,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119808&r=agr
  9. By: Bangsund, Dean A.; Hodur, Nancy M.; Leistritz, F. Larry; Nudell, Dan
    Abstract: The uncertain future of the Conservation Reserve Program has created substantial interest for agricultural producers, rural businesses, community leaders, sportsmen, and wildlife organizations. Many regions of the upper Great Plains have participated heavily in the CRP as evidenced by program acreage reaching land enrollment limits; however, current enrollment and re-enrollment criterion are expected to substantially reduce CRP acreage in many parts of the Great Plains. The divergence of interests between pursing post-CRP lands for agricultural production versus retaining the wildlife habitat and wildlife populations supported on CRP lands presents land owners and agricultural producers with important land management decisions over the next several years. This research examines the regional economic implications of post-CRP land use among traditional agricultural uses, wildlife production, and multiple-use practices. Of particular interest is whether multiple-use management on post-CRP lands can produce similar returns to landowners and producers as traditional land uses, and determine the effects of multiple-use management on post-CRP lands on regional economic output. A multiple-use system implemented on post-CRP lands based primarily on beef grazing while producing corn and barley for forage and retaining a portion of acreage in dedicated wildlife habitat would not compete economically with other conventional land uses. The net change in gross receipts within the regional economy from agricultural uses of post-CRP lands exceeded lost recreational expenditures in all scenarios evaluated.
    Keywords: North Dakota, Conservation Reserve Program, Recreation, Agriculture, Land Management, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:119832&r=agr
  10. By: Gedikoglu, Haluk
    Abstract: Current study analyzed the socio-economic factors that impact farmersâ willingness to grow switchgrass and Miscanthus in Missouri and Iowa. The results of study show that current level of farmersâ willingness to grow either crop is low. Hence, there are barriers to accomplishing to goal of producing 21 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol by 2022, as set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The results of the ordered probit regressions show that farmers with higher education levels and smaller farm sales are more willing to grow energy crops. The results of this study show that currently growing energy crops is more attractive to small farms as a source of crop diversification, rather than an alternative crop production in the big scale by large farms.
    Keywords: Bioenergy, Cellulosic Ethanol, Switchgrass, Miscanthus, Ordered Probit, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2012–01–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119663&r=agr
  11. By: Gao, Xiang; Ishdorj, Ariun; Higgins, Lindsey
    Keywords: National School Lunch, Food Insecurity, Ordered Probit, Instrumental Variables, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, Health Economics and Policy, I18, I38, P46, Q18, R28,
    Date: 2012–01–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119778&r=agr
  12. By: Kunimitsu, Yoji
    Abstract: This study analyzed causative factors on TFP growth in Japanese agriculture. The regression analysis with consideration of correlation between factors demonstrated that without further deregulation for introducing new comers, enlarging farm management area and asset management for keeping public capital, agricultural TFP cannot be improved in the future.
    Keywords: fertility of farmland, human factor, scale economies, public capital stock, knowledge capital stock, technological progress, Total Factor Productivity, Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Public Economics,
    Date: 2012–01–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119727&r=agr
  13. By: Ahamadou, Aly; Dembele, Mamadou; Almas, Lal K.; Brooks, Kathleen R.
    Abstract: The reduction in the availability of irrigation water and the increase in pumping costs resulting from the decline in the Ogallala Aquifer make good management decisions more critical for the survival of the farm firm and the success of the agricultural sector in the Texas Panhandle. Response functions for irrigation and percentage potential evapotranspiration (PET) in the production of grain sorghum are estimated. The response functions are transferred into value product functions and combined with an irrigation energy cost function to determine the profit maximizing irrigation strategy. Three management decision variables; total water available, the level of irrigation and the water to meet crop ET requirements are evaluated. Grain sorghum yield, natural precipitation, irrigation, soil moisture content, potential evapotranspiration, and percent potential evapotranspiration (PET) data, collected over the period from 1998 through 2007 by commercial producers participating in the AgriPartners program are used to estimate the response functions. Results indicate that the optimum level of irrigation increases as the price of sorghum increases and decreases as the price of natural gas increases.
    Keywords: Grain sorghum, ET, maximizing profit, irrigation efficiency, input use optimization, water conservation, Ogallala Aquifer, Texas Panhandle., Farm Management, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q12, Q15, Q25, Q32, and Q34,
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119801&r=agr
  14. By: Wang, Yang; Barnett, Barry; Coble, Keith; Harri, Ardian
    Keywords: Area yield insurance, risk management, Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty, Q18, G22,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119775&r=agr
  15. By: Naanwaab, Cephas; Yeboah, Osei
    Abstract: This paper examines the effects of the North American Free Trade Agreement on agricultural commodity trade using extensive data. The data cover agricultural exports and imports between the U.S. and NAFTA partners over the extended period of 1989-2010. The commodities covered in our analyses include; corn, soy bean, cotton, wheat, fresh vegetables, poultry, dairy products, and red meats. Since the signing of the agreement, U.S. total agricultural commodity trade with NAFTA members has increased three-fold from $18 billion in 1994 to $61 billion in 2010. A partial equilibrium model, in which we derive each trading partner's excess demand and excess supply, is used to study the impact of NAFTA on trade, controlling for other trade-inducing variables such as exchange rates, tariffs, per capita incomes, and relative prices. Regression results show mixed effects of NAFTA on different commodities while graphical and counterfactual analyses indicate strictly positive effects.
    Keywords: NAFTA, Agricultural commodities, trade, partial equilibrium analysis, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, International Relations/Trade, Marketing,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119730&r=agr
  16. By: Asci, Serhat; Borisova, Tatiana; VanSickle, John J.; Zotarelli, Lincoln
    Abstract: This study focuses on development of agricultural best management practices (BMPs) for potato production areas in Northeast Florida, and presents the results of the initial situation assessment. BMP implementation is the primary strategy used by agencies and farmers to improve the efficiency and to ensure environmental sustainability of agricultural production. Although BMPs are defined as âeconomically feasibleâ and âcost-effectiveâ, economic analysis conducted as a part of BMP development has been limited, leaving the room for disagreement about economic impacts of specific BMPs. As a part of the situation assessment, we used interviews, group discussions, a survey, and a field trip to collect information about farmersâ production practices and to examine farmersâ opinions about BMP development process. Then, partial budget analysis was used determine the relative impacts of various factors (including the implementation of nitrogen fertilization management BMP) on production returns. Finally, an economic model is proposed to incorporate production risk analysis in BMP evaluation process.
    Keywords: Florida potato production, partial budget analysis, risk analysis, best management practice, nitrogen fertilization, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119797&r=agr
  17. By: Vorotnikova, Ekaterina; VanSickle, John; Borisova, Tatiana
    Abstract: The objective of this study was to examine the economic benefits associated with precision fungicide application system for Florida strawberry production. Given the weather and disease forecast system developed by the University of Florida researchers (Peres, 2010a , strawberry growers can potentially 1) reduce fungicide application rates during cool and dry conditions without affecting yields, thus reducing production costs; or 2) apply fungicide at the precise time of high disease pressure during warm and wet weather, therefore, decreasing disease development and spread, and increasing the yields and profits.
    Keywords: fungicide application reduction, precision disease management system, strawberry, effect on yield, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119791&r=agr
  18. By: Arthur, Bruno; Katchova, Ani L.
    Abstract: This study investigates the stock prices of the US agriculture industries with regard to anomalous abnormal returns. Do the Accrual Anomaly documented for the entire US stock market less the financial institutions persists in the US Agriculture Industries? Using the risk-free trading strategy of Sloan (1996), which takes a long position on firms with low accruals and a short position on firms with high accruals, we compare ten portfolios formed by sorting the firms on increasing magnitude of accruals for each main component of the US agriculture. We use the SIC and NAICS codes on the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) classification of the six agricultural industries to merge the balance sheet and income statement data from Standard & Poorâs COMPUSTAT with the farms and farm related firms stock prices from the Center for research in Security Prices (CRSP). We find no convincing evidence of positive abnormal returns for the stocks of US farm and farm related firms, agricultural input firms, food supply chain firms and indirect agribusiness firms. This result suggests that more scrutiny of the stock prices for the US agriculture related firms with regards to the
    Keywords: stock returns, financial assets in agriculture, accrual anomaly, Agricultural Finance, Q14, G11,
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119822&r=agr
  19. By: Han, Doo Bong; Nayga, Rodolfo M. Jr; Lee, Ji Yong; Yoon, Jong Min
    Abstract: The aim of this paper is to determine Korean consumersâ valuation for domestic rice and imported rice from China and the US. Using revealed preference data from random nth price auction mechanism, our results generally suggest that consumersâ willingness to pay (WTP) for domestic rice is higher than the WTP for imported rice. Results also suggest that while country of origin and food miles information positively influences consumersâ WTP for domestic rice, country of origin information provides higher valuation for domestic rice than food miles information. Country of origin and food miles information has no statistically significant effect on WTP for the imported Chinese rice product but food miles information has a negative effect on WTP for the imported US rice product. Implications of the findings for rice industries for Korea, the US and China are discussed.
    Keywords: Rice, Country of origin information, Food mile information, Experimental auction, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119817&r=agr
  20. By: Vassalos, Michael; Dillon, Carl; Coolong, Tim
    Abstract: This study combines whole farm economic analysis with biophysical simulation techniques in order to achieve a twofold objective. First, the study seeks to develop a multiple enterprise vegetable farm model with a production and marketing decision interface and, second, to determine optimal production practices for Kentucky vegetable growers. Three vegetable crops are examined: tomatoes, bell peppers and sweet corn. The findings indicate that the risk associated with vegetable production can be significantly mitigated with diversification of production mix and with a greater number of transplanting dates. However, this reduction in risk comes at a high cost in terms of expected net returns.
    Keywords: vegetable production, mean-variance, biophysical simulation, farm management, Farm Management, C61, C63, D81,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:120016&r=agr
  21. By: Lim, Kar Ho; Hu, Wuyang; Maynard, Leigh; Goddard, Ellen
    Abstract: The controversy surrounding the Mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling (COOL) has attracted research attentions. A number of studies have reported consumers are willing to pay more for beef labeled with U.S. origin versus beef from unknown or other origins. Despite that, relatively little is known about what motivates consumersâ preference for origin-labeled food products (Lusk et al 2006). Using Individual-Level Parameters following a mixed logit model, we found that U.S. consumers were willing to pay significantly less for imported steak from Australia and Canada compare to U.S. steak. Further, we found that the negative willingness to pay is associated strongly with consumersâ perception of food safety on the exporting country.
    Keywords: beef, country of origin, mixed logit, individual-level parameters, stated choice experiment, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Q13, Q18,
    Date: 2012–01–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119755&r=agr
  22. By: Rudi, Jeta; Davis, George C.; You, Wen
    Abstract: The goal of this study is to estimate the goods-time elasticity of substitution in the process of home food production using the concept of Morishima elasticity of substitution. Our aim is to find out how the elasticity of substitution varies as time in home food production is disaggregated into the following categories: time in food preparation, time in clean-up, time in shopping for groceries, and time in traveling for grocery shopping. In order to conduct our empirical analysis, we make use of data from the American Time Use Survey matched with data from Eating and Health Module and Food Security Supplement.
    Keywords: Morishima elasticity of substitution, input disaggregation, home food production., Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119715&r=agr
  23. By: Mekonnen, Dawit K.; Huang, Chung L.; Greg, Fonsah
    Abstract: The Quadratic AIDS model was estimated to analyze the U.S. fruit consumption using annual per capita consumption data and prices for a demand system consisting of fresh fruit, fruit juice and other processed fruit. All Marshallian own price elasticities are found to be negative and the demand system is dominated by complementarity relationships. Both own and cross price Marshallian elasticities are less than one. Fruit juices are found to be expenditure elastic conditional on the total expenditure on fruits while fresh fruits and other processed fruits are found to be expenditure inelastic. However, fresh fruit is close to being unitary expenditure elastic. After allowing for curvature in the Engel function, U.S. fresh fruit demand is found to be more responsive to changes in income than in previous studies.
    Keywords: Demand estimation, U.S fruit consumption, Quadratic AIDS, AIDS, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119767&r=agr
  24. By: Basnet, Arjun; Kenkel, Philip
    Abstract: The paper summarizes the harvesting and transportation costs of biomass in an individual producerâs framework versus a cooperative framework using a feasibility template developed in MS Excel. The cost is compared between individual producer having 1000 acres of land and a cooperative with five members each having 1000 acres of land. The estimated total cost per ton for harvesting biomass and transporting it to a warehouse 20 mile far is $25.53 for individual producer and $18.00 for cooperative. The mowing, raking and baling cost per ton is estimated to be $5.71, $3.94 and $11.16 respectively for individual producer and $4.97, $2.00 and $5.85 respectively for cooperative.
    Keywords: Biomass, Switchgrass, Harvesting, Transportation, Cooperative, Agricultural and Food Policy, Financial Economics, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119781&r=agr
  25. By: Barfield, Ashley; Bergstrom, John; Ferreira, Susana
    Abstract: The production of many crops depends on biotic pollination. As pollinator populations decline, assessments of the potential consequential loss of economic value are critical. We estimate the economic value of pollination services ($608 million), crop vulnerability ratio (21 percent), and pollinationâs contribution to agricultural production value (5 percent) for Georgia.
    Keywords: Pollination, Colony Collapse Disorder, Georgia, Bioeconomic, Value, Vulnerability, Ecosystem Services, Crops, Honeybees, Pollinators, Pollination Dependency, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119780&r=agr
  26. By: Neal, Kalyn; Doye, Damona; Brorsen, Wade
    Abstract: This study seeks to take fragmentation research in a new direction by looking at exurban sprawl and fragmentation of ownership. The primary objective of this study is to identify the location and magnitude of fragmentation of agricultural land parcels sold in Oklahoma. This was accomplished by estimating two different models. The first model regressed a polynomial in time to determine whether or not fragmentation has been increasing over time. While it was hypothesized that parcel size was decreasing, this was not found to be the case. Over the 40 years of data, parcel size was found to only have decreased by one acre. The purpose of the second model was to verify whether or not a location premium exists for small parcels. It was found that a location premium does exist for smaller parcels with parcels in urban counties more likely to receive a premium than those located in more rural counties.
    Keywords: fragmentation, land values, parcel size, Production Economics,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119774&r=agr
  27. By: Williams, Brian; Raper, Kellie; DeVuyst, Eric; Peel, Derrell; Lalman, David; Richards, Chris; Doye, Damona
    Abstract: The utilization of marketing programs to enhance feeder calf value has been met with modest success in Oklahoma. Value-added programs are continually promoted as avenues for improving cow-calf profitability, but producer adoption of value-added practices lags in spite of research showing the value of these practices. Identifying producer characteristics that increase their likelihood to adopt value-added practices is critical to developing successful outreach efforts. Results from a survey of Oklahoma producers on value-added practice adoption indicate that multiple demographic variables influence a producerâs likelihood of practice adoption. For Extension specialists, results can help in targeting likely adopters and developing methods to overcome barriers to adoption by producers less likely to adopt.
    Keywords: Beef producers, value-added practices, practice adoption, negative binomial regression, Poisson regression, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Q12, Q16,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119743&r=agr
  28. By: Jensen, Jennifer; Dicks, Mike
    Abstract: The research addresses the economic problem of deforestation. A contributing factor to deforestation is coffee production. Coffee is an indigenous plant that is naturally occurring in the native tropical forests. However, conventional coffee is grown on cleared forest soil. In the native forest there is the potential for additional fruits (bananas, mangoes, avocados) and wood products while in the conventional coffee production system the only product is coffee. Conventional coffee production often causes deforestation and soil erosion while the organic coffee production system does not. In addition, the price risk associated with the coffee monoculture is high and has proven disastrous to the sustainability of coffee production in past years. Thus, determining the comparative cost and return between the two methods can provide important information for coffee producers. The purpose of the research is to determine the per acre profitability between conventional and organic coffee. This will be determined by researching the distribution of quantity on representative plots. This will help identify any size or scale economies. Determining the difference in profit per acre between organic and conventional coffee production included identifying and working with production stakeholders, engaging in fieldwork, site and case study selection, and determining measurable, non-market benefits and costs that pertain to environmental and community factors. This included, but is not limited to fertilization, water, pesticide use, and timber harvest.
    Keywords: coffee, inputs, outputs, species variation, Costa Rica, organic, conventional, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, International Relations/Trade, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119864&r=agr
  29. By: Walters, Lurleen; Jones, Keithly
    Abstract: Using FAO data for 1961-2009, this study characterizes the trends in Caribbean food imports and uses the Central Bureau Statistics demand system to estimate import demand parameters. The findings and policy implications of the study are evaluated in the context of Caribbean food security concerns.
    Keywords: Caribbean, food imports, import demand parameters, Central Bureau Statistics demand system, food security, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, International Relations/Trade, Q17,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119724&r=agr
  30. By: Almas, Lal K.; Lust, David G.; Brooks, Kathleen R.; Girase, J. R.
    Abstract: The potential of three feedstocks: grain sorghum, sweet sorghum, and switchgrass for ethanol production in the top 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle Region is analyzed using yield and production costs of feedstock, processing cost of feedstock, final demand for ethanol, farm to wholesale marketing margin, and the derived demand price of feedstock. The calculated economic returns per acre of grain sorghum, sweet sorghum, and switchgrass are -$45.37, -$410.19, and -$150.17 respectively under irrigated condition and -$38.25, -$145.09, and -$29.04 respectively under dryland condition. The evaluation in this study demonstrates that ethanol production from grain sorghum, sweet sorghum, and switchgrass in the Texas Panhandle Region is not economically feasible given the current price for ethanol in Texas. This is consistent with the status of the ethanol industry in the Texas Panhandle.
    Keywords: Ethanol production, Texas Panhandle, Grain sorghum, Sweet sorghum, and Switchgrass, Feedstock, Crop Production/Industries, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q16, Q25, Q27, and Q42,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119723&r=agr
  31. By: Hartarska, Valentina; Nadolnyak, Denis
    Abstract: We use survey data to study the level of financing constrains faced by new farmers in Alabama post 2008, and identify who got loans. We find that new farmers are financially constrained but not impacted by the crisis. Lending was collateral driven, although lenders also considered profitability and cash flows.
    Keywords: financing constraints, access to agricultural credit, new farmers, Agricultural Finance, Financial Economics, Risk and Uncertainty, G31, Q12, Q14,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119799&r=agr
  32. By: Shen, Xuan; Hartarska, Valentina
    Abstract: Using data between 1995 and 2010, we find that agricultural banks are benefiting from the derivatives activities by reducing total risk without hurting their profit. In nonagricultural banks, both profitability and total risk are adversely affected, possibly due to speculative derivatives positions.
    Keywords: Agricultural Banks, Financial Derivatives, Profitability, Risk Management, Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119789&r=agr
  33. By: Gillespie, Jeffrey; Nehring, Richard
    Abstract: Costs, returns, and profitability of cow-calf farms that are organic or transitioning to organic are compared with those of cow-calf farms that are non-organic. A method of matching samples is used for the comparison. Results suggest higher cost of organic production due to higher unpaid labor, taxes and insurance, and overhead costs.
    Keywords: Matching Samples, Profit, Costs, Farm Management, Production Economics,
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119773&r=agr
  34. By: Abello, Francisco J.; Palma, Marco A.; Anderson, David P.; Waller, Mark W.
    Abstract: The primary objective of this paper was to determine key factors impacting the frequency of consumer visits to Texas farmersâ markets measured in number of visits per month. Data obtained from in-person surveys administered in two farmersâ markets locations were used to determine consumer, market factors, and socio-demographic characteristics of shoppers affecting frequency of visits. The results of the model showed that travel distance, number of adults in the household, market promotional characteristics such as entertainment and education activities, food events, as well as education and age were all determinants of frequency of visits to farmersâ markets.
    Keywords: direct marketing, frequency, local, farmersâ markets, Consumer/Household Economics, R11, Q13,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119786&r=agr
  35. By: Uematsu, Hiroki; Mishra, Ashok K.
    Abstract: The objective of this study is to estimate the impact of natural amenity on farmland values in the contiguous United States using a quantile regression approach and data from the 2006, 2007, and 2008 Agricultural Resource Management Surveys. The contribution of this study is three-fold. First, we explicitly include variables representing natural amenity and soil characteristics of farmland. Second, we employ a quantile regression approach to examine potentially heterogeneous impacts of natural amenity and soil characteristics at different quantiles of farmland values. Third, we utilized data from a nationwide survey of farm household to examine findings in studies using regional data are consistent at a national scale. Our quantile regression analysis offers some insightful results. Natural amenity is positively correlated with farmland values and its impact is often more pronounced at a higher price range of farmland.
    Keywords: Farmland Values, Quantile Regression, Natural Amenity, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, C14, Q15, Q24,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119804&r=agr
  36. By: Fu, Shengfei; Epperson, James E.; Ames, Glenn C. W.
    Abstract: The U.S.-Central America-Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) levels the playing field of trade between the United States and the six CAFTA-DR partner countries. Half of U.S. farm products gain immediate tariff-free access to the markets of the CAFTA-DR region. All Tariffs will be eliminated in 20 years. Under CAFTA-DR, tariffs on an important U.S. fresh fruit export to the region, fresh apples, declined from an initial base of 15%-25% in CAFTA-DR countries to zero immediately upon enforcement. The specific objective of this research is to analyze the impact of tariff elimination under CAFTA-DR on the trade of U.S. fresh apples. Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) is used for the analysis involving an excess-supply-excess-demand model with monthly trade data from January 2000 to December 2010. The more telling empirical results indicate that for each of the six CAFTA-DR countries, tariff elimination positively promotes U.S. apple exports to this region.
    Keywords: CAFTA-DR, trade liberalization, tariff elimination, Generalized Method of Moments (GMM), Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Q17,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119782&r=agr
  37. By: Vestal, Mallory K.; Lusk, Jayson L.; Cooper, Steven R.; Ward, Clement E.
    Abstract: As a result of several judicial rulings, the processing of horses for human consumption came to a halt in 2007. This article determines the impact horse prices suffered as a result of the elimination of horse processing facilities. A quantile regression approach is applied and is useful, as horses of varying quality were impacted differently. The authors acknowledge that the slaughter ban occurred alongside the U.S. economic downturn and attempts to account for the recession to adequately asses the policy effect.
    Keywords: horse processing, slaughter, quantile regression, price, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119766&r=agr
  38. By: Chavez, Eddie; Wailes, Eric
    Abstract: Potential adjustments in U.S. commodity program for rice are evaluated in this paper using stochastic analysis in a global modeling framework. Corresponding threshold and loss-compensatory increases in target price and loan rates are determined with assumed outright and gradual elimination of direct payments. Results show that if direct payments (DP) are eliminated in 2012, a 23% increase in both the target price (TP) and loan rate (LR) triggers counter-cyclical payments (CCP) 80% of the time; and it will take an increase of 48% in TP and LR to generate CCP enough to compensate for the loss in total DP. If DP is gradually removed over 5 years, the trigger and compensatory increases in TP and LR are 41% and 46%, respectively. Furthermore, if DP is eliminated outright and TP maintained, an increase of 71% in LR triggers loan deficiency payments (LDP) 75% of the time; and it will take an increase of 130% in LR to generate enough LDP to recoup the total loss in DP. Under gradual removal of DP, the trigger and compensatory increases in LR are 71% and 92%, respectively.
    Keywords: U.S. commodity program, threshold and loss-compensatory increases, stochastic analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Q18,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119772&r=agr
  39. By: Susanto, Dwi; Rosson, C. Parr; Costa, Rafael
    Abstract: This study empirically investigates the effects of structural reforms on bilateral trade flows of agricultural products. Specifically, the study jointly analyzes the impacts of three different reforms including financial reform, trade reform, and agricultural reform on agricultural trade. The results suggest that less restrictive credit constraints, reduced tariff rates, and less government interventions are likely to generate increase in total agricultural exports. The evidence further indicates that the impacts of the reforms vary considerably across less aggregated products as well as across reform forms. The results provide a solid policy foundation for pursuing structural reforms in order to stimulate trade and economic growth, given the fact that the index level of reforms has not reached the level of full liberalization yet
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119657&r=agr
  40. By: Nehring, Richard; Gillespie, Jeffrey; Hallahan, Charlie; Sauer, Johannes
    Abstract: We estimate an input distance function for U.S. dairy farming to examine the competitiveness of organic and non-organic dairy production by system and size. Across organic/non-organic systems and size classes, size is the major determinant of competitiveness based on various measures of productivity and returns to scale.
    Keywords: Organic, Non-organic, Input Distance Function, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2012–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119769&r=agr
  41. By: Deng, Xueting; Saghaian, Sayed; Woods, Timothy
    Abstract: As the U.S. consumption of sweeteners has increased, analysis of the demand for sweeteners has become more important. In this paper, consumer willingness-to-pay (WTP) for selected four types of sweeteners is evaluated. The four types of sweeteners are Kentucky grown pure maple syrup, artificially maple flavored syrup, sorghum syrup and molasses. Results suggest that consumers who are at high household income level (above $80,000) and with a smaller household size are likely to pay more for Kentucky grown maple syrup. Results show that there is no statistic difference for the annual household consumption among the four types of sweeteners.
    Keywords: artificial sweeteners, Kentucky, maple syrup, molasses, sorghum, willingness to pay, Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119811&r=agr
  42. By: Watkins, K. Bradley; Hristovska, Tatjana; Anders, Merle M.
    Abstract: Irrigation fuel costs represent a significant portion of rice production expenses. Multiple inlet (MI) irrigation represents a water saving alternative to conventional flood irrigation. This study uses simulation to calculate the range of monetary benefits to MI in rice production. Water savings from MI relative to conventional flood irrigation along with rice yields, rice prices, and prices for key production inputs (diesel and fertilizer) are simulated, and stochastic rice net returns above variable and fixed expenses are calculated for different pump lifts with and without MI. Monetary benefits to MI are measured as the difference in net returns with and without MI. The results indicate MI monetary benefits depend greatly on pump lift and the presence or absence of a yield increase. Monetary benefits to MI increase as pump lifts become larger, and relatively small increases in yield resulting from MI irrigation can greatly enhance its payoff.
    Keywords: cost, cumulative distribution functions, multiple inlet irrigation, net return, rice, stochastic, Farm Management,
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119655&r=agr
  43. By: Hogan, Robert J. Jr.; Carlberg, Jared G.; Ward, Clement E.; Peel, Derrell S.
    Abstract: Prices for Choice and Select grade fed cattle are derived from wholesale and retail beef markets. Choice-Select price discounts are a key component of fed cattle pricing, whether packers purchase fed cattle on a live weight, dressed weight, or grid. This study identifies supply, demand, and other factors affecting the Choice-Select discount series using an adaptive expectations model. It is found that the lagged value of the discount as well as the percentage grading Choice exert statistically significant influences on the discount, while neither the boxed beef price nor seasonality affect the discount.
    Keywords: Choice-Select discount, marketing, prices, quality, Demand and Price Analysis, Marketing,
    Date: 2012–01–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119814&r=agr
  44. By: Mahrizal; Nalley, Lanier; Dixon, Bruce; Popp, Jennie
    Abstract: This study sets out to empirically estimate the optimum annual replacement rate and age of cocoa trees in order to maximize the net present value of four common cocoa production systems. The study examines the costs and returns of four common cocoa production systems in Ghana associated with changes in cocoa prices, fertilizer prices, inflation rates, and labor prices. While this study focuses on cocoa, the methodology is applicable to any perennial crop. This study uses empirical yield curves and cost of production data from Ghana to determine when and what percentage of a cocoa orchard should be replaced annually to maximize net present value of revenues over time. Successive versions of the model are solved to determine how input and output price changes affect optimal replacement rates and replacement ages. Producers in both high- and low-income countries are reluctant to cull still productive assets, such as trees that are diminishing in yield over time. The Excel based model developed in this study could provide extension personnel with a simple yet powerful tool to illustrate to producers the benefits of systematic tree replacement. This study provides strong evidence of the benefits of replacing trees at the optimal time and rate.
    Keywords: Cocoa, Replacement Rate, Net Present Value (NPV), Production Economics, Q01, Q15, Q32,
    Date: 2012–02–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119777&r=agr
  45. By: Sylvain Dessy; Gaston Gohou; Désiré Vencatachellum
    Abstract: We study the welfare effects of government-backed FDIs in Africa’s farmlands. We build an occupational choice model featuring four mechanisms driving these effects. First, local farming is subject to social arrangements prescribing that farmers share their crop surplus with kin. Second, proceeds from land investment deals are invested to make modern inputs affordable to local farmers. Third, these deals cause some farmers to shift to wage employment. Fourth, they also entrench export-oriented agriculture, at the expense of local markets. We show that three conditions are sufficient for such deals to make local people better off: (i) the state has a high capacity and willingness to negotiate deals that benefit local people; (ii) these deals create enough jobs; (iii) wage employment make displaced farmers better off. Fulfilling these three conditions, however, may conflict with the interests of profit-maximizing foreign investors.
    Keywords: FDIs in farmland, local populations, welfare
    JEL: O13 Q15 Q24 Q28
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:lvl:lacicr:1203&r=agr
  46. By: Wright, Andrew P.; Mitchell, Donna; Hudson, Darren
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119947&r=agr
  47. By: Haque, Mohua; Biermacher, Jon T.; Kering, Maru K.; Gureztky, John A.
    Abstract: There is limited information available explaining the agronomic and economic relationships between yield and nitrogen and phosphorus applications to growing switchgrass produced in phosphorus-deficient soils. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers on feedstock yield and measures of expected total cost, gross revenue, net return, and breakeven price of feedstock produced in phosphorus-deficient soils in the southern Great Plains. Data were collected from a three-year, two-location agronomic field study conducted in south-central Oklahoma. Two discrete nitrogen treatments (0 and 134 kg ha-1) and four discrete phosphorus treatments (0, 30, 60 and 90 kg ha-1) were randomly assigned to small plots arranged in a randomized complete block designed (RCBD) study. Random effects mixed ANOVA models were used to estimate the effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and nitrogen by phosphorus interactions on feedstock yield and the economic variables specified. Results showed that, on average over site-years, switchgrass yield increases from 10.5 to 12.3 Mg ha-1 with the highest (101-kg ha-1) treatment; however, we found no statistical difference in net profitability between phosphorus treatments. Yield and net return did respond significantly to 135 kg-1 of N ha-1. Our results suggest that phosphorus-deficient soils do not seem to have the same impact on switchgrass yield and profitability as they do for the yields and profitability of other crops traditionally grown in this region.
    Keywords: bioenergy feedstock, economics, phosphorus-deficient soils, nitrogen, switchgrass, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Production Economics,
    Date: 2012–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119765&r=agr
  48. By: Chavez, Holcer; Nadolnyak, Denis; Kloepper, Joseph
    Abstract: In this paper, we analyze the impact of the Microbial Inoculants (MI) Technology on apple yields and pesticide application using 2007 farm data. The results show that pesticide usage is not reduced by MI applications. However, there is a significant positive effect on the yields. Apple production efficiency is 37%.
    Keywords: Microbial Inoculants, apple production, frontier analysis, damage control, Farm Management, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119796&r=agr
  49. By: Egyir, Irene; Adu-Nyako, Kofi; Okafor, Ralph
    Abstract: Market survey data from Ghana was used to gain understanding of consumersâ attitudes, preferences for foreign food products, and the role product country of origin plays in the demand for poultry. Intention to purchase poultry from the US was anchored on product packaging, quality, expiry date and country of origin.
    Keywords: Country of origin, consumer preference, poultry demand, Ghana, US exports., Agribusiness, Industrial Organization, Marketing, Q13, Q17,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119745&r=agr
  50. By: Wan, Wei; Hu, Wuyang
    Abstract: This study investigates demographic and socioeconomic factors contributing to at-home consumption of seafood in Kentucky through a 2010 survey. The Tobit and Craggâs double-hurdle model are analyzed and tested. Numbers of people in the household, household income, race and employment status are significant determinants of at-home seafood consumption in Kentucky.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Seafood consumption, At-home, Kentucky, Double-Hurdle Model,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119807&r=agr
  51. By: Li, Xiaoqian; Saghaian, Sayed
    Abstract: Although the effect of HACCP on international trade is an issue with many concerns recently, only a few empirical studies focus on the impact of HACCP on U.S seafood export industry. Using the approach of Gravity Model with adjustment of unobserved country characteristics, this paper contributes to analyze the differential effects of HACCP implementation on three kinds of seafood: fishes, mollusca, and shellfish other than mollusca. The results indicate that HACCP application has negative but insignificant effect on seafood exports in the short run. In the long run, HACCP only negatively and significantly affect seafood exports of mollusca and shellfish. Moreover, the higher risk of food born disease seafood has, the easier is seafood trading affected by the enforcement of stricter food safety standards.
    Keywords: HACCP, Mollusca, Fishes, Shellfish Other Than Mollusca, Trade Flow, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119859&r=agr
  52. By: Alamo, Carmen I.; Malaga, Jaime
    Abstract: Scanned data was used to estimate US coffee demand using an AIDS model. The estimated elasticities have the expected signs and magnitude. Differentiated coffees are complements for regular and unclassified while regular and unclassified coffees are substitutes. These results could be useful in designing marketing strategies by coffee suppliers.
    Keywords: demand, coffee, differentiation, Demand and Price Analysis,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119885&r=agr
  53. By: Baldwin, Katherine L.; Jones, Keithly G.
    Abstract: Citrus fruits make up one-fifth of all fresh fruit consumed in the United States. Given the increasing importance of imported citrus in the diet of American consumers, it is perhaps surprising that no import demand analysis of U.S. citrus has been conducted. Using quarterly U.S. import data for six citrus commodities, we employed a demand systems model and evaluated aspects of seasonality. The results suggest wide variations in price responses to different types of imported citrus. The average amplitude and phase shift suggest that all citrus fruits exhibit some seasonality in their imports, likely a result of peak harvesting schedules of exporters.
    Keywords: Fresh citrus, oranges, limes, lemons, grapefruit, mandarins, import demand, seasonality, Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119741&r=agr
  54. By: Kaninda Tshikala, Sam; Fonsah, Greg
    Abstract: Melons constitute an important part of the U.S. fruit and vegetable industry even though they are produced only from May through December of each year. Import supplies from Latin American countries are used to make up for the domestic demand shortages. This paper investigates the U.S. demand for imported fresh and frozen melons using quarterly data on import volumes and unit prices. A static and a dynamic linear approximated almost ideal demand systems were estimated using ITSUR. Marshallian and Hicksian elasticities were used to analyze consumersâ responsiveness to price and income change in the short run and the long run.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119779&r=agr
  55. By: Soltani, Mohammad; Saghaian, Sayed
    Abstract: Raisins are one of important products of California. Almost all U.S. raisins are produced near Fresno Californiaâs central valley due to its hot growing season and abundant water supply. U.S. is the leading exporter of raisins in the world. This paper investigates the export demand function of U.S. raisins for the top five importer countries. The relationship of quantity exported with export price, other exportersâ prices, real income, and exchange rate is estimated. The model used is a logarithmic panel data model for the 1992-2008 periods. The model used is in log-log format to determine own- price, cross price, and income elasticities for the commodity.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea12:119860&r=agr

This nep-agr issue is ©2012 by Angelo Zago. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.