nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2011‒10‒15
176 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
University of Verona

  1. Policy and Strategy for the Growth of Agriculture Industry in Korea (Power Point) By Joo-ryang, Lee
  2. Agricultural R&D, Productivity and Global Food Security (PowerPoint) By Pardey, Philip G.
  3. What Factors Determine the Allocation of Aid to Agriculture? By van Dijk, Michiel
  4. The economic sustainability of cropping systems in Indian Punjab: A farmers' perspective By Singh Dhol, Sukhwinder; Park, Julian; Litten-Brown, Jennie
  5. How land fragmentation affects off-farm labor supply in China: Evidence from household panel data By Jia, Lili; Petrick, Martin
  6. Crop biodiversity repercussions of subsidized organic farming in Greece By Nastis, Stefanos A.; Michailidis, Anastasios; Mattas, Konstadinos
  7. Revisiting the "Cotton Problem" - A Comparative Analysis of Cotton Reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa By Delpeuch, Claire; Vandeplas, Anneleen
  8. Farm Subsidies and Agricultural Employment: The Education Channel By Berlinschi, Ruxanda; Van Herck, Kristine
  9. Adoption of GMHT Crops: Coexistence Policy Consequences in the European Union By Areal, Francisco J.; Riesgo, Laura; Gomez-Barbero, Manuel; Rodriguez-Cerezo, Emilio
  10. Estimating the Technical Optimal Scale of Production in Danish Agriculture By Rasmussen, Svend
  11. Cap Impact on Rural Households Livelihood Strategies in Bulgaria By Nikolov, Dimitre; Anastassova, Minka; Radev, Teodor
  12. Estimated Impacts of New Zealand Agriculture Climate Policy: A Tale of Two Catchments By Daigneault, Adam J.; Greenhalgh, Suzie; Samarasinghe, Oshadhi
  13. Biofuels and Rural Economic Development in Latin America and the Caribbean By José Falck-Zepeda; Siwa Mangi; Timothy Sulser; Patricia Zambrano; César Falconi
  14. Impact of Off-farm Income on Farm Efficiency in Slovenia By Bojnec, Stefan; Ferto, Imre
  15. Resilience of European farms under different CAP scenarios By Polman, Nico; Peerlings, Jack H.M.; Slangen, Louis H.G.
  16. The Role of Rural Development in the CAP Post 2013 By Jambor, Attila
  17. Econometric Analysis of the Effects of Subsidies on Farm Production in Case of Endogenous Input Quantities By Henningsen, Arne; Kumbhakar, Subal C.; Lien, Gudbrand
  18. Pluriactivity in Italian Agriculture: Are Farmers Using Interlinked Strategies? By Dries, Liesbeth; Pascucci, Stefano; Gardebroek, Cornelis
  19. Agricultural Expenditure in the Future Eurpean Union Budget By de Filippis, Fabrizio; Henke, Roberto; Salvatici, Luca; Sardone, Roberta
  20. Technical efficiency under resource scarcity: Non-parametric approach Uzbekistan agriculture By Hasanov, Shavkat
  21. To Subsidize or Not to Subsidize Private Storage? Evaluation of the Effects of Private Storage Subsidies as an Instrument to Stabilize Agricultural Markets After CAP Reforms By Femenia, Fabienne
  22. Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Latin America and the Caribbean: Current Situation, Future Trends and One Policy Experiment By Stephen Vosti; Siwa Msangi; Eirivelthon Lima; Ricardo Quiroga; Miroslav Batka; Chad Zanocco
  23. Explaining Finnish Farmers' Policy Responses with Environmental Attitudes By Arovuori, Kyosti
  24. The Effect of Agricultural Policy Reforms on Income Inequality in Swiss Agriculture - An Analysis for Valley, Hill and Mountain Regions By El Benni, Nadja; Finger, Robert
  25. Short-term Farm Level Adaptations of EU15 Agricultural Supply to Climate Change By Leclere, David; Jayet, Pierre-Alain; Noblet-Ducoudre, Nathalie De
  26. Recognizing and Managing the Tropical Agricultural Revolution in Latin America and the Caribbean By Daniel Nepstad
  27. Modeling Processor Market Power and the Incidence of Agricultural Policy: A Non-parametric Approach By Goodhue, Rachael E.; Russo, Carlo
  28. Factors Affecting the Impact of CAP Scenarios on Farm Structure: An Analysis Based on Stated Intentions By Bartolini, Fabio; Viaggi, Davide
  29. Distributional Effects of CAP Subsidies: Micro Evidence from the EU By Ciaian, Pavel; Kancs, D'Artis; Paloma, Sergio Gomez y
  30. Food Expenditure Patterns of the Generation 50+: An Engel-Curve Analysis for Germany By Herrmann, Roland; Burzig, Johanna
  31. Counterfactual Approach for Assessing Agri-environmental Policy: The Case of the Finnish Water Protection Policy By Lankoski, Jussi; Ollikainen, Markku
  32. A modeling framework for the analysis of biomass production in a land constrained economy – the example of Austria By Bernhard Stürmer; Johannes Schmidt; Erwin Schmid; Franz Sinabell
  33. Consumersâ Valuation for European food quality labels: Importance of Label Information Provision By Caputo, Vincenzina; Aprile, Maria Carmela; Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr.
  34. Understanding the adoption of systemic innovations in smallholder agriculture: the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) in Tumor Leste By Noltze, Martin; Schwarze, Stefan; Qaim, Matin
  35. The proximity of a field plot and land-use choice: implications for land consolidation By Grammatikopoulou, Ioanna; Myyra, Sami; Pouta, Eija
  36. An analysis of the potential CAP changes: A Finnish case study By Niemi, Jyrki; Kettunen, Lauri
  37. On-farm weather risk management in suckler cow farms: A recursive discrete stochastic programming approach By Mosnier, Claire; Agabriel, Jacques; Lherm, Michel; Reynaud, Arnaud
  38. Smallholder Farmers and Collective Action: What Determines the Intensity of Participation? By Fischer, Elisabeth; Qaim, Matin
  39. Socio-Economic Impacts of the Agricultural Emissions Trading Scheme By Timar, Levente
  40. An analytical framework for soil degradation, farming practices, institutions and policy responses By Prager, Katrin; Schuler, Johannes; Helming, Katharina; Zander, Peter; Ratinger, Tomas; Hagedorn, Konrad
  41. The Economic Determinants of the On-farm Management of Rice Cultivars in the Rhone River Delta (France) By Jaeck, Melanie; Lifran, Robert
  42. Challenging Small-scale Farming, A Non-parametric Analysis of the (Inverse) Relationship Between Farm Productivity and Farm Size in Burundi By Verschelde, Marijn; D'Haese, Marijke F.C.; Vandamme, Ellen; Rayp, Glenn
  43. Globalization Issues and Consumersâ Purchase Decisions for Food Products: Evidence from a Lab Experiment By Disdier, Anne-Celia; Marette, Stephan
  44. Exploratory Research into the Resilience of Farming Systems during Periods of Hardship By Parsonson-Ensor, Chris; Saunders, Caroline M.
  45. DETERMINANTS OF FOOD PRICE INFLATION IN FINLAND By Irz, Xavier T.; Niemi, Jyrki; Xing, Liu
  46. Liability Rules, Collective Organizations and the Provision of Food Safety By Goodhue, Rachael E.; McCarthy, Nancy
  47. Consumersâ Willingness to Pay for Food Safety in Nairobi: The Case of Fresh Vegetables By Lagerkvist, Carl Johan; Hess, Sebastian; Ngigi, Marther; Okello, Julius
  48. Large-Scale Modelling of Global Food Security and Adaptation under Crop Yield Uncertainty By Fuss, Sabine; Havlik, Petr; Szolgayova, Jana; Schmid, Erwin; Obersteiner, Michael
  49. Sustainable or not sustainable, thatâs the question: ranking European regional agricultural systems using Data Envelopment Analysis By Gerdessen, Johanna C.; Pascucci, Stefano
  50. Evaluation of Agro-Environmental Policy through a Calibrated Simulation Farm Model By Hansen, Kristiana; de Frahan, Bruno Henry
  51. Latin American Agricultural Trade: The Role of the WTO in Sustainable Virtual Water Flows By Niemeyer, Insa; Garrido, Alberto
  52. Reductions of Agricultural Nitrogen Use Under Consideration of Production and Price Risks By Finger, Robert
  53. Differentiated Implementation of the Second Pillar of CAP: A Budget Analysis of Member States and Regions of the European Union By Lataste, Francois-Gael; Berriet-Solliec, Marielle; Trouve, Aurelie
  54. Distributional Effects of the CAP on Western German Farm Incomes and Regional Farm Income Disparity By Deppermann, Andre; Grethe, Harald; Offermann, Frank
  55. DETERMINANTS OF GRASSLAND USE RIGHT TRANSFER IN INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE: EVIDENCE FROM PASTORAL CHINA By Yu, Lu; Wang, Xiaoxi
  56. Using the Ricardian Technique to estimate the impacts of climate change on Crop Farming in Pakistan By Ahmed, Mirza Nomman; Schmitz, P. Michael
  57. EUROPEAN RAPESEED AND FOSSIL DIESEL: THRESHOLD COINTEGRATION ANALYSIS AND POSSIBLE IMPLICATIONS By Ziegelback, Martin; Kastner, Gregor
  58. Short-term Marginal Costs in French Agriculture By Latruffe, Laure; Letort, Elodie
  59. Structural Change and Landscape Appearance By Kapfer, Martin; Ziesel, Sigrid; Kantelhardt, Jochen
  60. Price Transmission in Three Italian Food Chains: A Structural Break Approach By Carraro, Alessandro; Stefani, Gianluca
  61. An Ex-ante Rural/Urban Analysis of Common Agricultural Policy Options By Psaltopoulos, Demetris; Phimister, Euan; Ratinger, Tomas; Roberts, Deborah; Skuras, Dimitris; Santini, Fabien; Gomez y Paloma, Sergio; Balamou, Eudokia; Espinosa, Maria; Mary, S.
  62. Managing Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Latin America: Assessing the National, Regional, and Global Effects of Halting Deforestation in the Tropics By Stephen Vosti; Siwa Msangi; Eirivelthon Lima; Ricardo Quiroga; Miroslav Batka; Chad Zanocco
  63. Do Direct Payments Influence Farmers' Hail Insurance Decisions? By Finger, Robert; Lehmann, Niklaus
  64. Assessment of the Agri-food System for Sustainability: Recognizing Ignorance By Rivera-Ferre, Marta G.; Ortega-Cerda, Miquel
  65. Farming or burning? shadow prices and farmerâs impatience on the allocation of multi-purpose resource in the mixed farming system of Ethiopia By Teklewold, Hailemariam
  66. VOLUNTARY CERTIFICATION SCHEMES AND LEGAL MINIMUM STANDARDS By Herzfeld, Thomas; Jongeneel, Roel
  67. Impacts of Promoting Perennial Crops in the French Agriculture By Fradj, Nosra Ben; Jayet, Pierre-Alain
  68. Relationship of Development and Fiscal Indicators with Agricultural Producer Support in the OECD Economies By Siudek, Tomasz; Zawojska, Aldona
  69. Public-private partnerships and GLOBALGAP standard adoption: evidence from small-scale fruit and vegetable farmers in Thailand By Kersting, Sarah; Wollni, Meike
  70. Investment in Irrigation Systems under Weather Uncertainty By Heumesser, Christine; Fuss, Sabine; Szolgayova, Jana; Strauss, Franziska; Schmid, Erwin
  71. Competing claims on land use for food and biodiversity By Tabeau, Andrzej; van Berkum, Siemen
  72. Possible Impacts of Climate Change on Mediterranean Irrigated Farming Systems By Dono, Gabriele; Cortignani, Raffaele; Doro, Luca; Ledda, Luigi; Roggero, PierPaolo; Giraldo, Luca; Severini, Simone
  73. Agriculture and Climate Change: Socially Optimal Production and Land Use By Ervola, Asta; Lankoski, Jussi; Ollikainen, Markku
  74. Feeding the Cities and Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Beyond the Food Miles Approach By de Cara, Stephane; Fournier, Anne; Gaigne, Carl
  75. Dominos in the dairy: An analysis of transgenic maize in Dutch dairy farming By Groeneveld, Rolf A.; Wesseler, Justus; Berentsen, Paul B.M.
  76. Food Sovereignty and Agricultural Trade Policy Commitments: What are the Margins of Manoeuvre for West African States? By Laroche, Dupraz C.; Postolle, A.
  77. Identifying obstacles to the design and implementation of payment schemes for ecosystem services provided through farm trees By Schleyer, Christian; Plieninger, Tobias
  78. Agricultural Efficiency Gains and Trade Liberalization in Sudan By Siddig, Khalid H.A.; Babiker, Babiker Idris
  79. The Impact of Information on the Willingness-to-Pay for Labeled Organic Food Products By Rousseau, Sandra; Vranken, Liesbet
  80. Productivity and Subsidies in European Union Countries: An Analysis for Dairy Farms Using Input Distance Frontiers By Latruffe, Laure; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Moreira, Victor H.; Desjeux, Yann; Dupraz, Pierre
  81. A New Sampling Design for Swiss Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) Data By Roesch, Andreas
  82. The Effect of Altruism on Consumer Behavior in Japan: an Analysis on Rice Consumption using Scanner Data By Ujiie, Kiyokazu
  83. Food safety and quality, strategic levers for European products in emerging markets: the case of China. By Caracciolo, Francesco; Cembalo, Luigi; Cicia, Giovanni; Del Giudice, Teresa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Krystallis, Athanasios
  84. Price volatility, market regulation and risk management: challenges for the future of the CAP By Vincent Chatellier
  85. Where have all the farmers gone? EU Accession and Structural Change in Bulgaria By Van Herck, Kristine
  86. Land Use and Property Changes in Poland and in Hungary After EU Accession By Takacs-Gyorgy, Katalin; Erdelyi, Tamas; Sadowski, Adam
  87. AUCTIONING OUTCOME-BASED CONSERVATION CONTRACTS By Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe; Schilizzi, Steven; Breustedt, Gunnar
  88. Returns from Income Strategies in Rural Poland By Falkowski, Jan; Jakubowski, Maciej; Strawinski, Pawel
  89. AN ECONOMIC MODELLING APPROACH FOR VULNERABILITY ASSESMENT IN IRRIGATION FARMS IN SPAIN By Esteve, Paloma; Varela-Ortega, Consuelo
  90. Does Common Agricultural Policy Reduce Farm Labour Migration? A Panel Data Analysis Across EU Regions By Olper, Alessandro; Raimondi, Valentina; Cavicchioli, Daniele; Vigani, Mauro
  91. Limiting the Nitrogen Losses by N-tax and Bioenergy Support: A Quantitative Analysis of Environmental Policy Mix Impacts in the North of France By Fradj, Nosra Ben; Bourgeois, Cyril; Clodic, Melissa; Jayet, Pierre-Alain
  92. Estimation of Commodity Specific Production Costs Using German Farm Accountancy Data By Bahta, Sirak Teclemariam; Berner, Anja; Offermann, Frank
  93. PRODUCTIVITY OF BT COTTON AND ITS IMPACTS ON PESTICIDE USE AND FARM RETURNS: EVIDENCE FROM PAKISTANI PUNJAB By Bakhsh, Khuda
  94. Multifunctional Impacts of the Olive Farming Practices in Andalusia, Spain: An Analytic Network Approach By Carmona-Torres, Carmen; Parra-Lopez, Carlos; Sayadi, Samir; Hinojosa-Rodriguez, Ascension
  95. Profitability development of milk production on the Czech Republic in 2002-2010 By Kopecek, P.; Kopp, O.
  96. Modeling farmer participation to a revenue insurance scheme by means of Positive Mathematical Programming By Severini, Simone; Cortignani, Raffaele
  97. OUTSOURCING DECISIONS OF PIG PRODUCERS IN BADEN-WÃRTTEMBERG By Hess, Sebastian
  98. EU ENLARGEMENT TO TURKEY: POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND HOW THEY ARE SHAPED BY CHANGES IN MACROECONOMIC CONDITIONS By Fellmann, Thomas; van Leeuwen, Myrna; Salamon, Petra
  99. Efficiency and productivity change of Estonian dairy farms from 2001 - 2009 By Luik, Helis; Omel, Raul; Viira, Ants-Hannes
  100. Sourcing and Promotion of Local Foods by Food Cooperatives in the U.S. By Katchova, Ani L.; Woods, Timothy A.
  101. Allocation of CAP modulation funds to rural development measures at the regional level in Finland By Hyytia, Nina
  102. The Impact of Corruption on Farmers' Efficiency in Rice Production: A Natural Experiment from Bangladesh By Anik, Asif Reza; Breustedt, Gunnar; Bauer, Siegfried
  103. Farming Systems and Global Threats: Problems and Proposals Northern Portugal Cases By Marta-Costa, Ana Alexandra; Lourenco-Gomes, Lina
  104. Scale Effects, Technical Efficiency and Land Lease in China By Wang, Xiaobing; Yu, Xiaohua
  105. Can Vietnamese Upland Farmers Profit from High World Market Prices? A Price Transmission Analysis By Luckmann, Jonas; Ihle, Rico; Grethe, Harald; Kleinwechter, Ulrich
  106. ADAPTATION OF MEDITERRANEAN CROPS TO WATER PRESSURE IN THE EBRO BASIN: A WATER EFFICIENCY INDEX By Fernandez-Haddad, Zaira; Quiroga, Sonia
  107. Impact of Agricultural and Trade Policy Reform on land-use within the EU By Renwick, Alan W.; Jansson, Torbjorn; Verburg, Peter H.; Revoredo-Giha, Cesar; Britz, Wolfgang; Gocht, Alexander; McCracken, Davy
  108. Investment and Financial Constraints in European Agriculture: Evidence from France, Hungary and Slovenia By Ferto, Imre; Bakucs, Lajos Zoltan; Bojnec, Stefan; Latruffe, Laure
  109. Impacts of More Efficient Use of Manure Nutrients at Farm and Sector Level By Lehtonen, Heikki
  110. Alternative Insurance Indexes for Drought Risk in Developing Countries By Bobojonov, Ihtiyor; Sommer, Rolf
  111. CAP versus Rural Policy Challenges, Paradigm change By Halmai, Peter; Vasary, Viktoria
  112. Organic Productions and Capacity to Respond to Market Signals and Policies: An Empirical Analysis of a Sample of FADN Farms By Arfini, Filippo; Donati, Michele
  113. The consolidation phase: Survival strategies of farmers stabilizing and developing their businesses By Rantamaki-Lahtinen, Leena; Vare, Minna
  114. Testing for Moral Hazard and Ranking Farms by Their Inclination to Collect Crop Damage Compensations By Myyra, Sami; Pietola, Kyosti
  115. How cost-effective are direct payments to organic farms for achieving environmental policy targets? By Schader, Christian; Lampkin, Nic; Christie, Mike; Stolze, Matthias
  116. Trade policy reponses to food price rises and implications for existing domestic support measures: the case of China in 2008 By Yu, Wusheng; Jensen, Hans G.
  117. RESPONSES OF AGRICULTURAL BIOENERGY PRODUCTION IN BRANDENBURG (GERMANY) TO ECOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC AND LEGAL CHANGES: AN APPLICATION OF HOLLING'S ADAPTIVE CYCLE By Grundmann, Philipp; Ehlers, Melf-Hinrich; Uckert, Gotz
  118. Multinationals or Cooperatives: Does it Matter to Farmers? - A Study of the Dairy Sector in Punjab (India) By Vandeplas, Anneleen
  119. Price Discovery in Agricultural Commodities: The Shifting Relationship Between Spot and Future Prices By Baldi, Lucia; Peri, Massimo; Vandone, Daniela
  120. Participation in Modern Agri-Food Supply Chain in Senegal and Happiness By Dedehouanou, Senakpon; Maertens, Miet
  121. The Strategic Use of Private Quality Standards in Food Supply Chains By von Schlippenbach, Vanessa; Teichmann, Isabel
  122. INFLUENCES OF THE GOVERNMENTAL MARKET INTERVENTIONS ON WHEAT MARKETS IN SERBIA DURING THE FOOD CRISIS 2007/2008 By Djuric, Ivan; Goetz, Linde; Glauben, Thomas
  123. AHAZARD ANALYSIS OF CONSUMERSâ SWITCHING BEHAVIOUR IN GERMAN FOOD RETAILING FOR DAIRY PRODUCTS By Olearius, Gotz; Roosen, Jutta; Drescher, Larissa S.
  124. Price Changes, Policy Impacts and Instability in Farmersâ Revenues By Elsholz, Rudiger; Harsche, Johannes
  125. Profit Persistence in the Food Industry: Evidence from five European Countries By Gschwandtner, Adelina; Hirsch, Stefan
  126. Do Agricultural Subsidies Crowd-out or Stimulate Rural Credit Market Institutions?: The Case of CAP Payments By Ciaian, Pavel; Pokrivcak, Jan; Szegenyova, Katarina
  127. Farm Income Stabilization and Risk Management: Some Lessons from AgriStability Program in Canada By Kimura, Shingo; Anton, Jesus
  128. Total Factor Productivity Change of the Swiss Dairy Sector for the Mountain Region in the Period 1999 to 2008 By Jan, Pierrick
  129. Risk-Risk Tradeoffs in Fish Consumption: Can You Have the Cake and Eat It Too? By Rheinberger, Christoph M.; Hammitt, James K.
  130. WHY ARE FARMS GETTING LARGER? THE CASE OF THE U.S. By MacDonald, James M.
  131. Influence of Animal Feeding on Milk Supply in Navarre By Casasnovas, Valero L.; Aldanondo, Ana Maria
  132. An Analysis of Taste Variety within Households on Soft Drinks By Bonnet, Celine; Mouzon, Olivier de
  133. Access to Microfinance: Does it Matter for Profit Efficiency Among Small Scale Rice Farmers in Bangladesh? By Sumelius, John; Islam, K.M. Zahidul; Sipilainen, Timo
  134. Preferences, trust and willingness to pay for food information: An analysis of the Italian Market By Nocella, Giuseppe; Stefani, Gianluca; Romano, Donato
  135. Estimating the impact of transport efficiency on trade costs: Evidence from Chinese agricultural traders By Li, Zhigang; Yu, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yinchu
  136. Long-Term Agricultural GHG Emissions and Economic Growth: The Agricultural Environmental Kuznets Curve across Italian Regions By Coderoni, Silvia; Esposti, Roberto
  137. Fruit and vegatable consumption in Malaysia: a count system approach By Yen, Steven T.; Tan, Andrew K.G.
  138. The productivity situation in Macedonian agriculture: Gainers and losers during the first decade of the 21st century By Martinovska-Stojcheska, Aleksandra; Surry, Yves R.
  139. Reducing GHG Emissions by Abandoning Agricultural Land use on Organic Soils By Roeder, Norbert; Osterburg, Bernhard
  140. Potential Impacts of WTO Accession on the Agribusiness Sector in Bosnia and Herzegovina By Vanzetti, David; Nikolic, Aleksandra
  141. Entrepreneurial Proclivity, Market Orientation and Performance of Dutch Farmers and Horticultural growers By Verhees, Frans J.H.M.; Lans, Thomas; Verstegen, Jos A.A.M.
  142. Efficiency and Heterogeneity in Czech Food Processing Industry By Cechura, Lukas; Hockmann, Heinrich
  143. Market Dynamics in Supply Chains: The Impact of Globalisation and Consolidation on Food Companies' Mark-Ups By Kaditi, Eleni A.
  144. How do obese people afford to be obese? Consumption strategies of Russian households By Staudigel, Matthias
  145. Landowner response to policies regulating land improvements: lease or search for other options? By Eija, Pouta; Sami, Myyra; Kyosti, Pietola
  146. The effects of Information and Country of Origin on Japanese Olive Oil Consumer Selection By Mtimet, Nadhem; Ujiie, Kiyokazu; Kashiwagi, Kenichi; Zaibet, Lokman; Nagaki, Masakazu
  147. Farm Size and the Share of Irrigated Land in total Landholding: the case of Water-Harvesting Irrigation in Ethiopia By Wakeyo, Mekonnen B.; Gardebroek, Cornelis
  148. The role of financing frictions in agricultural investment decisions: an analysis pre and post financial crisis By O'Toole, Conor M.; Newman, Carol; Hennessy, Thia C.
  149. RISK, TECHNICAL EFFICIENCY AND MARKET TRANSACTION COSTS IN DIFFERENT ORGANISATIONAL FORMS: EVIDENCE FROM THE OBLAST TATARSTAN By Hockmann, Heinrich; Gataulina, Ekaterina; Hahlbrock, Konstantin
  150. Eliciting Risk Preferences: A Field Experiment on a Sample of French Farmers By Bougherara, Douadia; Gassmann, Xavier; Piet, Laurent
  151. INFLUENCE OF THE INTEGRATION OF AGROHOLDINGS WITH RUSSIAN FARMS ON TOTAL FACTOR PRODUCTIVITY AND ITS SUBCOMPONENTS By Hahlbrock, Konstantin; Hockmann, Heinrich
  152. A Spatial Mathematical Model Analysis of the Linkage between Agricultural Trade and Deforestation By Schmitz, Christoph; Lotze-Campen, Hermann
  153. Willingness to Pay for Enhanced Food Quality: Rice Parboiling in Benin By Demont, Matty; Zossou, Esperance; Rutsaert, Pieter; Ndour, Maimouna; Mele, Paul Van; Verbeke, Wim
  154. Comparing productivity growth in conventional and grassland dairy farms By Kellermann, Magnus; Salhofer, Klaus
  155. Agri-Environmental Policies When the Spatial Pattern of Biodiversity Reserves Matters By Bamiere, Laure; David, Maia; Vermont, Bruno
  156. Certification Logos in the Market for Organic Food: What are Consumers Willing to Pay for Different Logos? By Janssen, Meike; Hamm, Ulrich
  157. Technical Change Performance and Water Use Efficiency in the Irrigated Areas: Data Envelopment Analysis Approach By Chemak, Fraj
  158. Enhancing Irrigation Efficiency but Increasing Water Use: The Jevons' Paradox By Gomez, Carlos Mario; Gutierrez, Carlos
  159. Technical efficiency in competing panel data models: A study of Norwegian grain farming By Kumbhakar, Subal C.; Lien, Gudbrand; Hardaker, J. Brian
  160. ON ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND RISK EXPOSURE IN THE NILE BASIN OF ETHIOPIA By Falco, Salvatore Di; Veronesi, Marcella
  161. Modeling Carbon Leakages with Forestation Policies By de Gorter, Harry; Drabik, Dusan; Just, David R.
  162. European farming and post-2013 CAP measures. A quantitative impact assessment By Helming, John F.M.; van Meijl, Hans; Woltjer, Geert B.; Jansson, Torbjorn; Nowicki, Peter; Tabeau, Andrzej A.
  163. Productivity, sunk costs and firm exit in the French food industry By Blanchard, Pierre; Huiban, Jean-Pierre; Mathieu, Claude
  164. Comparative Analysis of Technical Efficiency in European Agriculture By Bakucs, Lajos Zoltan; Ferto, Imre; Latruffe, Laure; Desjeux, Yann; Soboh, Rafat; Dolman, Mark
  165. THE IMPACT OF RISK ON THE INEQUALITY: EVIDENCES FROM THE IRISH AGRICULTURAL SECTOR By Vollenweider, Xavier; Falco, Salvatore Di; O'Donoghue, Cathal
  166. Farm Level Economic Implications of Genetic Selection for Improving Milk Fat Composition By Demeter, Robert Milan; Bovenhuis, Henk; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard; Lansink, Alfons G.J.M. Oude; Meuwissen, Miranda P.M.; van Arendonk, Johan A.M.
  167. The Distributional Implications for Higher Farm Animal Welfare in New Zealand By Bicknell, Kathryn
  168. Opportunity Costs of Providing Crop Diversity in Organic and Conventional Farming: Would Targeted Environmental Policies Make Economic Sense? By Sipilainen, Timo; Huhtala, Anni
  169. Is There Co-Movement of Agricultural Commodities Futures Prices and Crude Oil? By Natanelov, Valeri; Alam, Mohammad J.; McKenzie, Andrew M.; Van Huylenbroeck, Guido
  170. A marketing-finance approach linking contracts in agricultural channels to shareholder value By Pennings, Joost M.E.; Wansink, Brian; Hoffmann, Arvid O.I.
  171. Agricultural Commercialization in the Uplands of Northern Vietnam: How to Achieve Both Poverty Reduction and Environmental Sustainability Goals? By Keil, Alwin; Saint-Macary, Camille; Zeller, Manfred
  172. Marketing, Cooperatives and Price Heterogeneity: Evidence from the CIS Dairy Sector By Sauer, Johannes; Gorton, Matthew; White, John
  173. Stochastic Viability of Second Generation Biofuel Chains: Micro-economic Spatial Modeling in France By Bamiere, Laure; Martinet, Vincent; Gouel, Christophe; Lecadre, Elodie
  174. Productive Efficiency in Water Usage: An Analysis of Differences among Citrus Producing Farms Sizes in Tunisia By Dhehibi, Boubaker
  175. DOES GROUP AFFILIATION INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY AND EFFICIENCY IN RUSSIAâS AGRICULTURE? EVIDENCE FROM AGROHOLDINGS IN THE BELGOROD OBLAST By Hahlbrock, Konstantin; Hockmann, Heinrich
  176. An economic approach to collective management of endemic animal diseases By Rat-Aspert, Olivier; Krebs, Stephane

  1. By: Joo-ryang, Lee
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nzar11:115417&r=agr
  2. By: Pardey, Philip G.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nzar11:114719&r=agr
  3. By: van Dijk, Michiel
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114827&r=agr
  4. By: Singh Dhol, Sukhwinder; Park, Julian; Litten-Brown, Jennie
    Abstract: Food for all continues to be a key issue, especially in the developing world where every fifth person is chronically undernourished. India, a fast growing developing country has also experienced serious food shortages for example in the mid 1960s. Punjab, a small northern Indian state has developed, particularly since the Green Revolution in the mid 1960s, to be a key agricultural area producing 13% of the food grains of India. Increased productivity brought economic benefits to farmers and led to the establishment of Wheat-Rice Cropping Pattern (WRCP) as the main agricultural system of Punjab which more recently has become reliant on underground water resources, agricultural machinery, chemical fertilisers and pesticides. More recently stagnating yields and increased cost of cultivation of WRCP have squeezed the net farm profitability. However, the WRCP has been, and remains the first choice of farmers, because of its comparative economic advantage, assured marketing and stable productivity level. This paper compares the economic sustainability of WRCP to that of other alternative cropping patterns in Punjab and answers the question âWhy farmers continue with the WRCP despite various crop diversification efforts in the pastâ. Interviews with 120 farmers across Punjab illustrated the economic and risk advantages of WRCP over other potential cropping patterns and concludes that if cropping systems in Punjab are to become more environmentally sustainable then policy makers will need to put mechanisms in place which either encourage a more sustainable WRCP or provide the basis for the growth of alternative, less environmentally damaging cropping systems.
    Keywords: agriculture, cropping systems, Punjab, sustainability, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116007&r=agr
  5. By: Jia, Lili; Petrick, Martin
    Abstract: Research on agricultural development in China has increasingly paid attention to the potentially negative effects of highly fragmented farm structures. This study provides a deeper theoretical understanding of the linkages between land fragmentation and off-farm labor supply and investigates this relationship empirically in a more direct and robust way than in the existing literature. Drawing upon a rural household panel dataset collected in Zhejiang, Hubei and Yunnan provinces from 1995-2002, we estimate the effects in two steps. First, we estimate the effect of land fragmentation on labor productivity using a time-demeaned translog production function. Second, we estimate the effect of land fragmentation on off-farm labor supply using Wooldridgeâs (1995) panel data sample selection model. The production function results show that land fragmentation indeed leads to lower agricultural labor productivity. It implies that land consolidation will make on-farm work more attractive and thus decrease off-farm labor supply. This conclusion is supported by a direct estimation of the off-farm labor supply function, but only for the group of farmers with the least involvement in off-farm labor. Our analysis suggests that, if more liberal land market policies and hardened property rights will allow more consolidated farmland in the future, this will not trigger a flood of former farmers leaving rural areas in search for alternative incomes. As it makes farm work more productive, it will rather provide an incentive to continue farming and raise agricultural productivity.
    Keywords: Land fragmentation, off-farm, labor supply, China, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114522&r=agr
  6. By: Nastis, Stefanos A.; Michailidis, Anastasios; Mattas, Konstadinos
    Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of CAP financial assistance on crop biodiversity under uncertainty. A stochastic production function is employed and estimated to assess whether risk-averse farmers hedge risk by diversifying their portfolio of crops, thus increasing crop biodiversity. The model is applied to farm-level data of organic crop farms in Greece. Organic farming financial assistance poses a double-edged sword: even though it is considered agrobiodiversity enhancing as a cultivation method, subsidizing it can become agrobiodiversity reducing, since farmers may select to cultivate only the subsidized crops. The study shows that risk aversion leads to crop biodiversity conservation. However, providing CAP financial assistance on certain crops appears to decrease the relationship between revenue risk management and crop biodiversity, indirectly resulting in crop biodiversity loss.
    Keywords: crop biodiversity, agroecosystem, risk management, agricultural assistance, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q12, Q18, D80, Q24, Q57,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114628&r=agr
  7. By: Delpeuch, Claire; Vandeplas, Anneleen
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114446&r=agr
  8. By: Berlinschi, Ruxanda; Van Herck, Kristine
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Labor and Human Capital,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114248&r=agr
  9. By: Areal, Francisco J.; Riesgo, Laura; Gomez-Barbero, Manuel; Rodriguez-Cerezo, Emilio
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114227&r=agr
  10. By: Rasmussen, Svend
    Abstract: This paper uses representative farm account data for 1985-2007 to estimate stochastic production frontiers in the form of input distance functions for Danish crop, dairy and pig farms. The objective is to study and compare scale economies for the three farm types. The estimated technical efficiency is relatively constant over time for all three farm types, but the elasticity of scale differs. Although the size of all farm types has increased considerably during the last 20 years, more than 95 % of the crop farms and 85 % of the dairy and pig farms are still below the estimated technical optimal scale of production. The results support the hypothesis that the restrictions concerning the amalgamation of farms and the purchase of farm land have seriously prevented Danish farmers, and especially cash crop farmers, from taking full advantage of scale economies.
    Keywords: Scale economies, agriculture, SPF, input distance function, technical optimal scale, elasticity of scale, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114790&r=agr
  11. By: Nikolov, Dimitre; Anastassova, Minka; Radev, Teodor
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114610&r=agr
  12. By: Daigneault, Adam J.; Greenhalgh, Suzie; Samarasinghe, Oshadhi
    Abstract: Agricultural and forestry greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a key feature of New Zealandâs emissions profile, and New Zealand is the only country, to date, to have indicated that agricultural and forestry emissions will be covered under their domestic climate policy â the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZETS). Forestry entered the NZETS in 2008 while agricultural emissions are expected to enter in 2015. Coupled with climate policy development is the increasing scrutiny of agricultural impacts on water in New Zealand. Given the multiple forms of environmental regulation facing the agricultural and forestry industries we explore, at the catchment level, the impacts of climate policy on the agricultural and forestry industries, including those on farm returns, GHG emissions, carbon sequestration, water quality and induced land use change. We use the recently developed New Zealand Forest and Agriculture Regional Model (NZ-FARM) to assess potential economic and environmental impacts of a climate policy that imposes a series of carbon prices on GHG emissions of land-based production in the Manawatu and Hurunui/Waiau catchments in New Zealand.
    Keywords: Agriculture and Forestry Modelling, Land Use, Climate Policy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Nutrient Loadings, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nzar11:115352&r=agr
  13. By: José Falck-Zepeda; Siwa Mangi; Timothy Sulser; Patricia Zambrano; César Falconi
    Abstract: This report analyzes the current state of R&D in agricultural biotechnology in Latin America and the Caribbean in the context of development of the sector. The objectives of this report where first to estimate biofuel production potential based on current land use, productivity patterns and available technologies, examine the determinants of energy and biofuel supply and demand, and finally, develop a forward looking analysis of the long term impact of biofuel expansion in Latin America and its effects on prices, trade, food security, malnutrition and other indicators. The analysis of the current feedstock production possibilities show that most countries in Latin America continue to lag behind in terms of productivity, with a few exceptions. This conclusion leads to the need to further support strengthening the agricultural sector by improving input and output markets and value added chains.
    Keywords: Agriculture & Food Security :: Agricultural Policy, Agriculture & Food Security :: Agricultural Research & Extension, Science & Technology :: Research & Development
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:37798&r=agr
  14. By: Bojnec, Stefan; Ferto, Imre
    Abstract: Impact of Off-farm Income on Farm Efficiency in Slovenia
    Keywords: Off-farm income, Stochastic frontier analysis, Panel regression, Quantile regression, Slovenia, Agricultural Finance, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114258&r=agr
  15. By: Polman, Nico; Peerlings, Jack H.M.; Slangen, Louis H.G.
    Abstract: The upcoming reform of the Common Agricultural Policy will put pressure on agricultural incomes and will cause more price volatility and income risk for farms in the EU. This raises the question if and how farms will survive these disturbances. Farms are able to survive only if they respond appropriately to disturbances. This resilience of farms is explained in this research by analysing the number of strategies that farmers indicate that they will use in a situation where the current CAP will continue and in a situation where it will disappear. The outcomes show that under both scenarios large more specialised farms with young farm heads are most resilient, and small more diversified farms headed by old farmers are least resilient. Results also show that farms that indicate to exit are the ones that are most dependent on CAP support, have old farm heads, and are part-time and diversified farms.
    Keywords: resilience, governance, CAP reform, count model, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114758&r=agr
  16. By: Jambor, Attila
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114456&r=agr
  17. By: Henningsen, Arne; Kumbhakar, Subal C.; Lien, Gudbrand
    Abstract: The effect of subsidies on farm production has been a major topic in agricultural economics for several decades. We present a new approach for analyzing the effects of different types of coupled and decoupled subsidies on farm production with econometric methods. In contrast to most previous studies, our approach is entirely based on a theoretical microeconomic model, explicitly allows subsidies to have an impact on input use, and takes linkages between the farm and the farm household into account.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114548&r=agr
  18. By: Dries, Liesbeth; Pascucci, Stefano; Gardebroek, Cornelis
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114429&r=agr
  19. By: de Filippis, Fabrizio; Henke, Roberto; Salvatici, Luca; Sardone, Roberta
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114451&r=agr
  20. By: Hasanov, Shavkat
    Abstract: Water scarcity and land degradation increases led to a sharp rise in input resourceâs costs. These developments make it increasingly difficult for agricultural farms to produce according to the demand for food and other commodities, especially owing a rapid population growth. The present study aims to focus on scarce resource use in the agricultural production of the Zarafshan valley by means of the efficiency analysis. A DEA model is estimated to investigate the farm level efficiency levels with respect to the use of the limited resources available to the farmers. By the application of linear programming methods a âbest practice frontier is estimatedâ, classifying farms on the frontier as efficient and others as inefficient with respect to different scales. Technical and allocative efficiencies are calculated relative to the frontier. Results shows input resources are not used efficiently and a great majority of farms could effectively reduce considerable amounts of input use by still producing the same output.
    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114563&r=agr
  21. By: Femenia, Fabienne
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114360&r=agr
  22. By: Stephen Vosti; Siwa Msangi; Eirivelthon Lima; Ricardo Quiroga; Miroslav Batka; Chad Zanocco
    Abstract: This study employs the IFPRI IMPACT model to examine the effects of a hypothetical ban on the clearing of native vegetation for agriculture in tropical areas within LAC on GHG emissions, food production, food prices, and child malnutrition at several spatial scales. Results suggest that a complete ban on land clearing for agriculture would significantly reduce GHG emissions associated with the clearing of forests and other forms of natural vegetation vis-à-vis what would have occurred in the absence of the ban. The ban would also reduce agricultural production within tropical areas in LAC, however, the economic losses are not distributed uniformly across the three sub-regions within tropical LAC- the northern South American rim around the Amazon suffers approximately 45% of all losses in gross value of agricultural output attributable to the ban. The report also finds that at global level, the overall effects on commodity prices of the simulated ban on area expansion on LAC are not large and (hence) the effects on childhood malnutrition are small.
    Keywords: Agriculture & Food Security :: Agricultural Policy, Environment & Natural Resources :: Biodiversity & Natural Resources Management, Environment & Natural Resources :: Climate Change, Environment & Natural Resources :: Forests & Forestry, Climate Change, Forestry, Agriculture
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:35598&r=agr
  23. By: Arovuori, Kyosti
    Abstract: In general, farmers are often found to be resistant to environmentally targeted agricultural policies. On the other hand, a part of farmers are clearly self-motivated to undertake farm practices that are beneficial to the environment and resource conservation. What motivates these farmers to participate? How much of this participation can be explained with attitudes, and where these attitudes arise from? In this paper, we analyze the effect of farmersâ attitudes towards environmental policies and related issues on their farm level policy choice. The policy response analyzed is farmersâ choice to implement voluntary contract-based special measures in the current agri-environmental support scheme. Our results show that farmers fall into different groups in terms of their environmental attitudes. In addition, farmers falling into same group have similar behavior in making their policy choices. The paper will be further improved with more detailed analysis on the farm level and geographical factors behind the farmersâ attitudes. That second stage of our analysis will reveal, whether those farmers operating under more vulnerable environmental conditions and thus, higher environmental risks, are more willing to implement voluntary and more demanding policy measures.
    Keywords: farmers, agri-environmental policies, policy choice, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114216&r=agr
  24. By: El Benni, Nadja; Finger, Robert
    Abstract: We analyse the development of income inequality in Swiss agriculture for the period 1990-2009. To this end, Gini coefficients are estimated using FADN data. Furthermore, we estimate concentration ratios and Gini elasticities for market income, direct payments and off-farm income. Our analysis is separated for the three production regions in Swiss agriculture: valley, hill and mountain regions. This study is motivated by the fact that Swiss agricultural policy reforms resulted in dramatic changes of the importance of different income sources in the here considered period. Our results show that household income inequality increased only slightly between 1990 and 2009. Furthermore, agricultural policy reforms affected the income inequality differently in the considered production regions. More specifically, the introduction of area-based direct payments in 1992 mainly affected the valley region. In contrast, the introduction of cross-compliance and abandonment of farm household payments in 1999 had stronger effects for farmers in the hilly and mountainous region. An increase in direct payment income would decrease household income inequality, especially in the mountain and hill regions. Also off-farm income reduces income inequality while market income increases inequality.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114346&r=agr
  25. By: Leclere, David; Jayet, Pierre-Alain; Noblet-Ducoudre, Nathalie De
    Abstract: Assessing climate change impact on agriculture is a complex task involving a wide range of economical and physical processes, leading to significant uncertainties. At European scale, climate change impacts on agricultural supply have been appraised to be of relatively less important driver by the end of century compared to other global drivers. However these diagnoses are incomplete due to a limited representation of both spatial heterogeneity in important determinants of agricultural supply (soil, management practices and producer typology) and fine scale processes such as farm scale autonomous adaptation. We propose a complementary approach based on a modeling framework including a spatially explicit representation of productivity and producer behavior with regard to heterogeneity in soil, climate, and producer socio-economic context to appraise climate change impacts including autonomous farm-scale adaptations of EU15 agricultural supply to climate change. Our results suggest that without accounting for autonomous adaptation European agricultural supply may have interesting resilience properties at an aggregated scale despite significant heterogeneity at smaller resolution. Accounting for autonomous adaptations result in significant yield gains, and may lead to (i) a significant increase in the relative profitability of crops compared to other land-covers, thus possibly increasing its agricultural land-use share over other land covers, and (ii) an increase in total European production which may have impacts on agricultural goods markets, thus highlighting the need for integrating fine scale processes such as autonomous adaptation.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114391&r=agr
  26. By: Daniel Nepstad
    Abstract: In this technical note, the author discusses the implications of the rapid growth in agriculture in tropical Latin America and how new global and regional initiatives can support effective management of the ensuing environmental and social risks. The consequences of the tropical agricultural revolution for Latin America and the Caribbean vary greatly across nations and regions. The anticipated growth of the agricultural sectors in many nations could lead to higher rates of economic growth, more jobs, and higher export revenues.
    Keywords: Agriculture & Food Security :: Agricultural Policy, Agriculture & Food Security :: Agricultural Trade & Marketing, Agriculture & Food Security :: Plant, Animal, & Food Production, Environment & Natural Resources :: Forests & Forestry, IDB-TN-235
    Date: 2011–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:33178&r=agr
  27. By: Goodhue, Rachael E.; Russo, Carlo
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114618&r=agr
  28. By: Bartolini, Fabio; Viaggi, Davide
    Abstract: Several authors have emphasised the effect of agricultural policy (such as SFP) as a driver of structural change. This paper aims to identify the determinants of the change in the use of productive factors under different policy scenarios. The analysis is performed ex ante, assessing the effect of CAP abolishment (as compared to the current CAP) on the use of productive factors, based on stated intentions by farmers. The results highlight the role of farm size, intensity and education in determining different patterns of reaction to policy changes. Also differences are identified among the three main component of structural change, land, capital and labour, with the latter being the less dependent upon the CAP.
    Keywords: structural changes, CAP, stated intentions, multinomial logit, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114244&r=agr
  29. By: Ciaian, Pavel; Kancs, D'Artis; Paloma, Sergio Gomez y
    Abstract: In this paper we estimate the income distributional effects of the common agricultural policy (CAP) for farmers and landowners. Using a unique farm level panel data set from the FADN for the period 1995-2007 we employ the fixed effects, the Heckman selection bias and the GMM estimators to estimate income distributional effects of CAP subsidies. The results do not confirm the theoretical hypothesis that landowners benefit a large share of the CAP subsidies. According to our estimates, farmers gain between 60% to 95%, 80% to 178% and 86% to 90% of the total value of coupled crop/animal, coupled RDP and decupled payments, respectively. The CAP subsidies are only marginally capitalised in land rents. Our results suggest that rental rates are more responsive to structural variables and show a strong time dependency, suggesting the presence of rigidities in the EU rental markets, which constraint the adjustment of land rents to market signals and thus reduce landowners' gains from the CAP.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114291&r=agr
  30. By: Herrmann, Roland; Burzig, Johanna
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114543&r=agr
  31. By: Lankoski, Jussi; Ollikainen, Markku
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114404&r=agr
  32. By: Bernhard Stürmer (Institute for Sustainable Economic Development, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna); Johannes Schmidt (Institute for Sustainable Economic Development, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna); Erwin Schmid (Institute for Sustainable Economic Development, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna); Franz Sinabell (Austrian Institute of Economic Research)
    Abstract: Ambitious renewable energy targets have been implemented in the EU that can only be attained if further measures are taken to boost biomass production for energy uses on agricultural land. The aim of this discussion paper is to explore consequences for land use and environment if biomass production will be expanded for non-food purposes in Austria. We assess the bio-physical and economic production potentials of energy crops and explore the trade-offs between bioenergy and food production on arable lands in Austria. In a policy experiment, we analyze how costly it is to expand domestic non-food biomass production by employing an integrated modeling framework using an elaborated set of bio-physical and economic data. The results indicate that an expansion of biomass production for first and second generation biofuels would imply significant adjustment costs for the agricultural sector. Furthermore, increasing feedstock production would have significant impacts on land use and fertilizer intensity levels. The economic analysis considers differences of regions and site conditions, which lead to higher opportunity costs, and hence, higher feedstock costs as assumed in previous studies. Subsidizing domestic biomass production likely leads to rising regional food and feed prices as well as factor prices (e.g. land renting) in a land constrained economy.
    Keywords: land use competition, bioenergy, non-food and food crops, integrated modeling
    JEL: Q1 Q4
    Date: 2011–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sed:wpaper:512011&r=agr
  33. By: Caputo, Vincenzina; Aprile, Maria Carmela; Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114324&r=agr
  34. By: Noltze, Martin; Schwarze, Stefan; Qaim, Matin
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114604&r=agr
  35. By: Grammatikopoulou, Ioanna; Myyra, Sami; Pouta, Eija
    Abstract: Traditional methods in agricultural economics and agricultural engineering have yielded mixed results when specifying the costs of an unfavourable parcel structure. Concepts related to travel costs and the production function are frequently applied when the costs of farming distant parcels are examined. However, farmersâ perspective regarding preferences for land use is ignored or partly overlapped by predictions made by researchers. Based on applied econometric models fitted to stated preference data, we revealed that the proximity of a field plot is a relevant factor affecting land-use decisions. One-fourth of landowners would change the use of a field plot if the condition of distance was changed. Landowners would continue farming a field plot if its distance from the farm compound was reduced, being willing to accept on average â¬79 less in net income per ha per year. The effect of a greater proximity of field plots to the farm compound following land consolidation was heterogeneous, particularly depending on the farm size and its location.
    Keywords: land use options, distance factor, land consolidation, choice experiment, multinomial logit model, random parameters model., Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114602&r=agr
  36. By: Niemi, Jyrki; Kettunen, Lauri
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114612&r=agr
  37. By: Mosnier, Claire; Agabriel, Jacques; Lherm, Michel; Reynaud, Arnaud
    Abstract: Currently France wants to introduce a weather risk management framework into its agricultural policy for livestock farming. The aim of this paper is to better understand how on-farm risk reducing strategies modify the production system and profit distribution of French suckler cow enterprises. We present in this paper an original bioeconomic model that takes into account both risk anticipation and risk adjustments and that details biotechnical relationships between the different components of the beef cattle production system and their dynamics. On-farm risk management strategies are endogeneized under weather uncertainty and tested on real observed weather sequences. We simulate four scenarios characterized by different risk aversions and feed prices. Results emphasized that production adjustments, particularly the adjustments of area of grassland harvested and the possibility to purchase substitutes to on-farm forage production, improve farmers profit under weather variability. However, limiting the amplitude of these adjustments helps decreasing profit variability. All simulated long term decisions associated to risk reducing strategies encompass a reduction of long term stocking rate and the constitution of feed stocks. The impact of hay feed price on the market has similar effects on the long term strategy.
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114645&r=agr
  38. By: Fischer, Elisabeth; Qaim, Matin
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114354&r=agr
  39. By: Timar, Levente
    Abstract: The impacts of including the agricultural sector in the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) depend on how farmers change their behaviour in response to the increased cost of emissions. Yet most analyses of the ETS do not allow for a behavioural response. This paper partially addresses the gap in the literature: it allows for farmers to change their land use to reflect the reduced returns from pastoral agriculture as well as the potential to earn carbon credits for sequestration performed by plantation forestry and scrub. Simulations performed in the Land Use in Rural New Zealand (LURNZ) model allow us to answer questions about the likely spatial and temporal distribution of the socio-economic impacts of the ETS.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nzar11:115509&r=agr
  40. By: Prager, Katrin; Schuler, Johannes; Helming, Katharina; Zander, Peter; Ratinger, Tomas; Hagedorn, Konrad
    Abstract: There is a lack of knowledge about the effectiveness and efficiency of soil conservation policies in agriculture and little understanding of how policy measures should be designed to encourage farmers to adopt soil conservation practices. This paper analyzes institutional settings surrounding agricultural soil management in ten European countries based on the Institutions of Sustainability framework. This framework considers the interdependencies between ecological and social systems, taking into account environmental conditions, farming practices impacting on soil conservation, different types of actors, policies, institutions and governance structures. The purpose of this paper is to describe the analytical framework and the methodology that all case studies are based on, present and discuss compared findings, outline implications for successful soil conservation policy, and draw conclusions on the methodological approach. The case studies focused on the main soil degradation types occurring across Europe which are addressed by a broad range of mandatory and incentive policies. The findings highlight the following issues: i) the need to design policies that target the locally most common soil threats and processes in the light of agricultural management; ii) the need to take farming management constraints into consideration, (iii) the need for good communication and cooperation both between agricultural and environmental authorities as well as between governmental and non-governmental stakeholders; iv) the necessary mix of mandatory and incentive instruments; and v) the need for data and monitoring systems allowing the evaluation of the effectiveness of policies and soil conservation practices.
    Keywords: Institutional analysis, soil degradation, soil conservation policy, soil conservation measures, farming practices, policy evaluation, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114773&r=agr
  41. By: Jaeck, Melanie; Lifran, Robert
    Abstract: The aims of our paper are to identify economic determinants of the on-farm cultivars diversity and to empirically characterize the farmers' diversi…cation choices. We focus on the private decision making process involving the choice of rice cultivars and the corresponding allocation of farmland. For a speci…c crop, the choice of cultivars, and the resulting cul- tivars portfolio, involves the farmer comparing bene…ts and costs. Among the many costs involved, we focus on diversity's management costs. Our results rely on original data collected during the spring 2009 in the study area, and involve a sample of 86 economic units growing rice. We es- timated a count data model, in which the endogeneous variable is the number of cultivars grown on the farm. After that, we studied the factors explaining the portfolio choice in terms of commercial rice grain, and the on-farm repartition between these di¤erent types. A multinomial logit model was used, with three alternatives, be specialized into a particular type of rice grain (long or round), or grow simultaneously these two types, or …nally be diversi…ed with niche market varieties. And …nally we esti- mated the percentage of long rice compared to the percentage of round rice with a linear regression model. The results con…rm the importance of the interactions between market related bene…t and the management constraints on land and labor.
    Keywords: varietal diversity, rice cultivar, multinomial logit, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nzar11:115508&r=agr
  42. By: Verschelde, Marijn; D'Haese, Marijke F.C.; Vandamme, Ellen; Rayp, Glenn
    Abstract: We use a nonparametric estimation of the production function to investigate the relation- ship between farm productivity and farming scale in poor smallholder agricultural systems in the north of Burundi. Burundi is one of the poorest countries in the world, with a predominant small scale subsistence farming sector. A Kernel regression is used on data of mixed cropping systems to study the determinants of production including dierent factors that have been identied in literature as missing variables in the testing of the inverse relationship such as soil quality, loca- tion and household heterogeneity. Household data on farm activities and crop production was gathered among 640 households in 2007 in two Northern provinces of Burundi. Four production models were speci ed each with dierent control variables. For the relatively small farms, we nd clear evidence of an inverse relationship. The relatively large farms show a dierent pattern. Returns to scale are found to be farm scale dependent. Parametric Cobb-Douglass models tend to over-simplify the debate on returns to scale because of not accounting for the dierent eects of large farms. Other factors that signicantly positively aect production include the soil quality and production orientation towards banana or cash crop production. Production seems to be negatively aected by eld fragmentation.
    Keywords: inverse relationship, farm size, nonparametric, Burundi, Farm Management, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115550&r=agr
  43. By: Disdier, Anne-Celia; Marette, Stephan
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114439&r=agr
  44. By: Parsonson-Ensor, Chris; Saunders, Caroline M.
    Abstract: This paper investigates the management strategies and responses used by New Zealand sheep and beef farmers to ensure resilience during periods of hardship. Using two, farm level surveys conducted in 1986 and 2010, some aspects of resilient farming systems were identified. Despite apparent hardship current farmers seemed more willing to take risks, with many more borrowing to invest in on farm developments than those in 1986. The main similarity between time periods was the greatest response to economic changes being the adoption of a low input policy. This result was quite significant, as conventional farmers are generally believed to resort to other strategies or responses.
    Keywords: Resilience, New Zealand, indicators, sustainable agriculture, strategies, Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nzar11:115511&r=agr
  45. By: Irz, Xavier T.; Niemi, Jyrki; Xing, Liu
    Abstract: The agricultural commodity crisis of 2006-8 and the recent evolution of commodity markets have reignited anxieties in Finland over fast-rising food prices and food security. Although the impact of farm commodity price shocks on the final consumer is mitigated by a large degree of processing as well as the complex structure of the food chain, little is known about the strength of the linkages between food markets and input markets. Using monthly series of price indices from 1995 to 2010, we estimate a vector error-correction (VEC) model in a co-integration framework in order to investigate the short-term and long-term dynamics of food price formation. The results indicate that a statistically significant long-run equilibrium relationship exists between the prices of food and those of the main variable inputs consumed by the food chain, namely agricultural commodities, labour, and energy. When judged by the magnitude of long-run pass-through rates, farm prices represent the main determinant of food prices, followed by wages in food retail and the price of energy. However, highly volatile energy prices are also important in explaining food price variability. The parsimonious VEC model suggests that the dynamics of food price formation is dominated by a relatively quick process of adjustment to the long-run equilibrium, the half life of the transitional dynamics being six to eight months following a shock.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114460&r=agr
  46. By: Goodhue, Rachael E.; McCarthy, Nancy
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114620&r=agr
  47. By: Lagerkvist, Carl Johan; Hess, Sebastian; Ngigi, Marther; Okello, Julius
    Abstract: Large urban areas in developing countries represent currently the most dynamically growing markets for food products. This study investigates the willingness to pay of consumers in Nairobi for safer leafy vegetables. We survey individualsâ perceived food safety across four major market categories, while also considering the explanatory role of trust and behavioral, psychological, and socio-demographic covariates. Results show that willingness to pay is market-specific and multi-faceted, with trust and perceived risks as important drivers, while income plays only a subordinate role. We conclude that policy makers should aim to reduce asymmetric information within the value chain without raising food prices such that safer vegetables would become unaffordable for the poor.
    Keywords: Food safety, perceived risk, willingness to pay, regression tree, urban agriculture, Crop Production/Industries, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114409&r=agr
  48. By: Fuss, Sabine; Havlik, Petr; Szolgayova, Jana; Schmid, Erwin; Obersteiner, Michael
    Abstract: Concerns about future food security in the face of volatile and potentially lower yields due to climate change have been at the heart of recent discussions on adaptation strategies in the agricultural sector. While there are a variety of studies trying to quantify the impact of climate change on yields, some of that literature also acknowledges the fact that these estimates are subject to substantial uncertainty. The question arises how such uncertainty will affect decision-making if ensuring food security is an explicit objective. Also, it will be important to establish, which options for adaptation are most promising in the face of volatile yields. The analysis is carried out using a stochastic version of the Global Biosphere Management Model (GLOBIOM) model, which is a global recursive dynamic partial equilibrium bottom-up model integrating the agricultural, bio-energy and forestry sectors with the aim to give policy advice on global issues concerning land use competition between the major land-based production sectors. The source of stochasticity is the interannual crop yield variability, making it more risky to rely on average yields and thus requiring stochastic optimization techniques. The results indicate that food security requires overproduction to meet minimum food supply constraints also in scenarios of negative yield shocks, where the additional land needed is sourced from forests and other natural land. Trade liberalization and enhanced irrigation both appear to be promising food supply stabilization, and hence land saving, mechanisms in the face of missing storage.
    Keywords: food security, food price volatility, optimization under uncertainty, adaptation, land use change, Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114347&r=agr
  49. By: Gerdessen, Johanna C.; Pascucci, Stefano
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114627&r=agr
  50. By: Hansen, Kristiana; de Frahan, Bruno Henry
    Abstract: This paper evaluates the production and income effects from the adoption of one popular agro-environmental measure, which concerns buffer strips along field edges, on a representative sample of crop farms in Belgium taken from the Farm Accountancy Data Network database. We represent the economic behaviour of each crop farm with a profit-maximisation programming model that embeds an estimated ex-ante flexible cost function. We calibrate the simulation model using the Positive Mathematical Programming approach. Accounting for farm and regional heterogeneity, simulation results show how crop farms may respond differently to incentives for the agroenvironmental measure. Results demonstrate that economic incentives can be an effective mechanism for encouraging uptake of agro-environmental measures and that impacts of agro-environmental measures can vary by farm and region, depending on agronomic conditions and the environmental potential for agro-environmental measure activity.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114577&r=agr
  51. By: Niemeyer, Insa; Garrido, Alberto
    Abstract: International agricultural trade has been growing significantly during the last decade. Many countries rely on imports to ensure adequate food supplies to the people. A few are becoming food baskets of the world. This process raises issues about the food security in depending countries and potentially unsustainable land and water use in exporting countries. In this paper, we analyse the impacts of amplified farm trade on natural resources, especially water. Farm exports and imports of five Latin America countries (Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Peru and Chile) are examined carefully. A preliminary analysis indicates that virtual water imports can save valuable water resources in water-short countries, such as Mexico and Chile. Major exporting countries, including Brazil and Argentina, have become big exporters due to abundant natural resource endowments. The opportunity costs of agricultural production in those countries are identified as being low, because of the predominant green water use. It is concluded that virtual water trade can be a powerful tool to alleviate water stress in semi-arid countries. However, for exporting nations a sustainable water use can only be guaranteed if environmental production costs are fully reflected in the commodity prices. There is no basis for erecting environmental trade tariffs on exporters though. Setting up legal foundations for them in full compliance with WTOs processes would be a daunting task.
    Keywords: farm trade, water, blue water, green water, global sustainability, food production, global food demand, water pricing, </dc:subject><dc:subject>WTO, International Relations/Trade, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114615&r=agr
  52. By: Finger, Robert
    Abstract: Production and price risks affect optimal nitrogen use as well as the effects of nitrogen taxation if farmersâ risk aversion is taken into account. Our empirical analysis for Swiss maize production shows that risk-aversion leads to lower levels of nitrogen application, and nitrogen taxes lead to higher reductions of nitrogen use for risk-averse than for risk-neutral farmers. Moreover, risk-averse farmers face lower abatement costs. Sensitivity analyses, that consider expected shocks in price and yield variability in Swiss maize production, show that these differences between risk-averse and risk-neutral farmers will increase further. Thus, agricultural policies should consider farmersâ risk-preferences as well as potential increases in farmersâ income risks.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114356&r=agr
  53. By: Lataste, Francois-Gael; Berriet-Solliec, Marielle; Trouve, Aurelie
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114399&r=agr
  54. By: Deppermann, Andre; Grethe, Harald; Offermann, Frank
    Abstract: This study is concerned with measuring impacts of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on farm income distribution of western Germany. Not only the sheer contribution of market price support and direct payments as a proportion of income is taken into account, but also the impact of support on production incentives. For this purpose, we apply a modelling system consisting of a partial equilibrium model and a programming model. Based on a comparison of Gini coefficients and a decomposition of overall inequality effects we conclude that liberalization of the agricultural sector leads to a more unequal distribution of family farm income in relative terms, whereas a liberalized market provides a more equal situation in absolute terms. Furthermore, we consider the impacts of liberalizing the agricultural market on regional differences in average agricultural income and conclude that in relative terms liberalization increases regional inequality.
    Keywords: Income distribution, CAP, Farm Group Model, Equilibrium Model, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114442&r=agr
  55. By: Yu, Lu; Wang, Xiaoxi
    Abstract: This paper focuses on factors influencing grassland lease, which will contribute to the heated debate about land use in China by extending to more extensive and vulnerable grassland regions. Based on review of grassland institutional change and analysis of data from 12 villages, this paper examines the impact of variables such as grassland property rights, grazing policies and physical attributes of actors on grassland lease. This paper also draws attention to widely existed illegal grazing and the implementation of grazing quota, as well as their impact on grassland lease and governance.
    Keywords: Land Use, Land Ownership and Tenure, Grassland lease, China, Landnutzen, Landbesitz, Graslandleasing, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114521&r=agr
  56. By: Ahmed, Mirza Nomman; Schmitz, P. Michael
    Abstract: This study uses the Ricardian valuation technique to estimate the effect of climate change on the crop farming sector in Pakistan. As a main contribution this paper uses a large household level dataset comprising 3336 farming entities to analyze long-term climate impacts on farm net crop revenues. In particular temperature increases in key growing seasons can be harmful. Annual losses for crop farming ranging from 100-200US$ can be expected. Given an average crop net income of 450US$ per hectare, these impacts can be devastating for farmers. The climate impacts will vary across geographic regions. Temperature is found to be the detrimental factor for farming in Pakistan. Precipitation changes seem to have a rather negligible effect.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114217&r=agr
  57. By: Ziegelback, Martin; Kastner, Gregor
    Abstract: For European operators of biofuels plants there are not many hedge vehicles available to hedge operational margins. Cross hedges for rapeoil (with the rapeseed futures contract) and RME (with the NYMEX diesel futures contract) could be useful instruments. We use recent developments on threshold cointegration approaches to investigate if asymmetric dynamic adjusting processes exist among rapeseed and diesel prices. The results suggest that a threeregime threshold cointegration model suitably explains the dynamics of the data.
    Keywords: Hedging, Rapeseed, Heating Oil, Threshold cointegration analysis, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Financial Economics, Industrial Organization, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114741&r=agr
  58. By: Latruffe, Laure; Letort, Elodie
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114385&r=agr
  59. By: Kapfer, Martin; Ziesel, Sigrid; Kantelhardt, Jochen
    Abstract: Our study examines the potential developments of cultural landscapes, taking into consideration various economic and social conditions (scenarios). The study takes place in three project regions which represent typical landscapes in Southern Germany and Austria. In each project area, the influence of a changing economic and political framework is analysed. The following scenarios are defined: (1) status quo (current economic and agri-political framework); (2) high-producer prices and constant (or even increasing) direct payments; and (3) low-producer prices and no (or very low) direct payments. In all three regions, potential production responses are estimated for all farms and aggregated on a regional level. The estimation takes into account social and economic parameters such as cash flow, size and type of farms, age of farmers and workload. The results show that the impact of the changing agro-economic environment differs in particular on the level of the study regions. Due to a lack of production alternatives, agricultural production in grassland areas is very unstable â especially if site conditions are unfavourable and economic conditions are disadvantageous. As a result, largescale abandonment of agriculture is likely in lowyield grassland areas and consequences for landscape appearance might be dramatic. In highyield grassland areas, agriculture is much more stable. However, under very disadvantageous conditions the extent of farms giving-up production is as high as in marginal grassland regions. Nevertheless one cannot expect large-scale set aside, because remaining farmers use the possibility of growth and lease a considerable quantity of land In contrast to this, farm structure in the arable regions is stable due to a high potential of production alternatives. However, landscape appearance may also change dramatically in this region due to the increasing importance of maize.
    Keywords: scenario analyses, structural change, landscape visualisation, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114777&r=agr
  60. By: Carraro, Alessandro; Stefani, Gianluca
    Abstract: Recently a wide instability of food prices has been observed in world and European agricultural and food markets. Both media and policy makers have dealt with the unsatisfactory patterns of marketing margins and price transmission along the food chain which may bring about distributive issues and affect inflationary trends. Although price transmission and margins dynamics have attracted so much interest at the policy level, few Italian studies deal with this topic. Our aim is to provide a first analysis of the price transmission mechanism in three Italian agri-food chains (lamb, pork and pasta), within a structural change framework. Results show that structural breaks in the price transmission mechanism are an issue in the food chain of pasta and pork with the regime change arising in occasion of the price bubble of 2007-2008.
    Keywords: price transmission, cointegration, structural breaks, Agribusiness, Q13, L11,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114317&r=agr
  61. By: Psaltopoulos, Demetris; Phimister, Euan; Ratinger, Tomas; Roberts, Deborah; Skuras, Dimitris; Santini, Fabien; Gomez y Paloma, Sergio; Balamou, Eudokia; Espinosa, Maria; Mary, S.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114780&r=agr
  62. By: Stephen Vosti; Siwa Msangi; Eirivelthon Lima; Ricardo Quiroga; Miroslav Batka; Chad Zanocco
    Abstract: The following handout is a summary of the IDB Discussion Paper "Agriculture Greenhouse Emissions in Latin America and the Caribbean: Food Security and Deforestation".
    Keywords: Agriculture & Food Security, Environment & Natural Resources :: Climate Change, Environment & Natural Resources :: Forests & Forestry, Climate Change, Forestry, Agriculture
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:35618&r=agr
  63. By: Finger, Robert; Lehmann, Niklaus
    Abstract: We analyze determinants of hail insurance use of Swiss farmers, covering the period 1990-2009 using FADN panel data. Mixed effect logistic regression models are estimated to identify the most important farm and farmer characteristics that determine insurance use. In addition, information on local hail risk is taken into account in these models. It shows that larger farms, with specialization on crop production, and with larger local hail risks are more likely to adopt the hail insurance. Moreover, insurance users are usually older and better educated. Since the early 1990s, Swiss agricultural policy has reduced price support and introduced general and ecological direct payments. This has led to a much higher importance of direct payments for farmersâ incomes. We find that this development has contributed to decreasing hail adoption rates in Switzerland in the considered period, due to the insurance and wealth effects of direct payments. Our results indicate that the larger the share of direct payments for total farm revenue, the more subsidies would be required to induce hail insurance adoption. Thus, agricultural policy should explicitly consider this interdependency.
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114355&r=agr
  64. By: Rivera-Ferre, Marta G.; Ortega-Cerda, Miquel
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115965&r=agr
  65. By: Teklewold, Hailemariam
    Abstract: In crop-livestock mixed farming system where farm yard manure (FYM) is considered as important multi-purpose resource such as source of soil organic matter, additional source of income and household source of energy, soil fertility depletion could takes place within the perspective of the household allocation pattern of FYM. This paper estimates structural FYM-allocation model in the presence of corner solution, with the objective of examining the role of various returns to FYM and farmerâs impatience on the propensity to allocate FYM for alternative purposes. We illustrate the model using data based on a random sample of 493 farm households in the central highlands of Ethiopia. We find that the higher the selling price of FYM is the higher the incentive for farmers to divert the resource from farming to marketing for burning outside the farm households. A farmersâ decision to turn FYM from farming to marketing due to heterogeneity in time preference is also an alternative account to explicate the correlation between farmersâ impatience and resource allocation. The implication is that the high discount rate and the rise of price encourage current consumption that has long term effect on the sustainable management of soil resource. The results are of paramount importance for the design of sustainable land management policy where soil fertility depletion is salient for low agricultural productivity.
    Keywords: impatience, shadow price, allocation, farm yard manure, Ethiopia, Farm Management, Q01, Q12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116080&r=agr
  66. By: Herzfeld, Thomas; Jongeneel, Roel
    Abstract: EU farmers face increasing requests to comply with legal as well as private agribusiness and retail standards. Both requests potentially raise farmerâs administrative burden. This paper discusses the potential synergies between cross-compliance and third-party certification schemes. In selected aspects cross-compliance and several certification schemes ask similar measures. However, both regulatory approaches differ considerably in other areas. The heterogeneous nature of the various certification schemes in place prevent a general conclusion. As a tendency systemic standards like organic agriculture provide the largest overlap with cross-compliance. Certificates of origin, on the opposite side, have no relation with cross-compliance.
    Keywords: Cross-compliance, certification schemes, institutional economics, Common Agricultural Policy, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Financial Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114728&r=agr
  67. By: Fradj, Nosra Ben; Jayet, Pierre-Alain
    Abstract: This paper is devoted to a quantitative analysis of the introduction of perennial crop in a short-term supply model. The analysis provides assessment of impacts regarding land use and N-input demand. We show that a variation in yield or the subsidy amount of miscanthus leads to a significant change in land use and N-input.
    Keywords: lignocellulosic perennial crop, bio-energy, mathematical linear programming, land use, N-input demand, Crop Production/Industries, Marketing,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114246&r=agr
  68. By: Siudek, Tomasz; Zawojska, Aldona
    Abstract: The paper seeks to quantify the effects of macro development and fiscal indicators on the agricultural producer support in the OECD countries during the period 1986-2009. The study is complementary to the body of microeconomic research that highlights the importance of support to agriculture industry. Data were obtained from the OECDâs Producer and Consumer Support Estimates database and the World Bankâs Word Development Indicators 2010 database. Producer Support Estimate (expressed in absolute value, in percent of total farm receipts - %PSE and per 1 ha of agricultural land) was taken as the dependent variable, whereas selected indicators describing performance of the economies were the independent variables. Simple linear regression analysis was conducted and resulted in many significant associations. In the period analyzed, there was a wide gap between the most and least supporting countries in terms of average %PSE and PSE per ha as well as substantial differences in degree of their inter-temporal variation occurred. Regression findings reveal, among others, that when countries were becoming richer, the %PSE was generally decreasing. Conflicting results were obtained for relationship between the %PSE and unemployment as in some countries it was negative, while in the others positive. Expansionary fiscal policy exerted opposite effects on the PSE in different countries.
    Keywords: producer support estimate, high-income countries, macroeconomics, public finance, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116009&r=agr
  69. By: Kersting, Sarah; Wollni, Meike
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114761&r=agr
  70. By: Heumesser, Christine; Fuss, Sabine; Szolgayova, Jana; Strauss, Franziska; Schmid, Erwin
    Abstract: Irrigated agriculture will play a crucial role to meet future food demand, but a sustainable water resource management in agriculture is crucial as well. Therefore, the European Water Framework Directive promotes several measures, e.g., the adoption of adequate water pricing mechanisms or the promotion of water-saving irrigation techniques. Since production conditions such as weather and climate development are uncertain, farmers might be reluctant to invest in a water-saving but capital intensive irrigation system. We apply a stochastic dynamic programming approach to analyze a farmerâs optimal investment strategy for either a waterâsaving drip irrigation system or sprinkler irrigation system under weather uncertainty and assess the probability of adopting either irrigation system until the year 2040. We design two policy scenarios: (i) irrigation water pricing and (ii) equipment subsidies for drip irrigation, and investigate how they affect the farmerâs optimal investment strategy. Our case study analysis is performed for the region Marchfeld, a typical semi-arid agricultural production region in Austria. We use data from the bio-physical process simulation model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) which accounts for site and management related characteristics as well as weather parameters from a statistical climate change model. We find that investment in drip irrigation is unlikely unless subsidies for equipment cost are granted. Even water prices do not increase the probability to adopt a drip irrigation system, but rather decrease the probability to invest into either irrigation system.
    Keywords: Irrigation investment, stochastic dynamic programming approach, water policies, weather uncertainty, EPIC, Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114536&r=agr
  71. By: Tabeau, Andrzej; van Berkum, Siemen
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116072&r=agr
  72. By: Dono, Gabriele; Cortignani, Raffaele; Doro, Luca; Ledda, Luigi; Roggero, PierPaolo; Giraldo, Luca; Severini, Simone
    Abstract: In the agricultural sector, climate change (CC) affects multiple weather variables at different stages of crop cycles. CC may influence the mean level or affect the distribution of events (e.g., rainfall, temperature). This work evaluates the economic impact of CC-related changes in multiple climatic components, and the resulting uncertainty. For this purpose, a three-stage discrete stochastic programming model is used to represents farm sector of an irrigated area of Italy and to examine the influence of CC on rainfall and on maximum temperature. These variables affect the availability of water for agriculture and the water requirements of irrigated crops. The states of nature, and their change, are defined more broadly than in previous analyses; this allows examining the changes of more climatic variables and crops cultivation. The effect of CC is obtained by comparing the results of scenarios that represent the climatic conditions in the current situation and in the future. The results show that the agricultural sector would seek to lower costs by modifying patterns of land use, farming practices and increasing the use groundwater. The overall economic impact of these changes is small and due primarily to the reduced availability of water in the future. The temperature increase is, in fact, largely offset by the effects of the increase in CO2 levels, which boosts the yield of main crops of the irrigated zone. Therefore, availability and water management becomes a crucial factor to offset the increase of evapotranspiration and of water stress resulting from the increase of temperature. However, the costs of CC are very high for some types of farming, which suffer a large reduction in income.
    Keywords: discrete stochastic programming model, climate change, water availability, irrigation requirements, Farm Management, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114436&r=agr
  73. By: Ervola, Asta; Lankoski, Jussi; Ollikainen, Markku
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114339&r=agr
  74. By: de Cara, Stephane; Fournier, Anne; Gaigne, Carl
    Abstract: In this paper, we study the impact of urbanization on the location of agricultural production and the GHG emissions related to transportation activities. We develop an economic geography model where the location of agricultural activities and urban population are endogenous. We show that increasing agricultural yields induce the spatial concentration of agricultural produc- tion in the least urbanized region if agricultural transport costs are relatively low and in the most urbanized region otherwise. In addition, interregional trade in agricultural commodities is desirable to reduce GHG emissions, except when urban population is equally split between cities. However, the market may induce too much agglomeration of agricultural production when yields are high and when collection costs are low.
    Keywords: Urbanization, agriculture location, transport, Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Q10, Q54, R12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114350&r=agr
  75. By: Groeneveld, Rolf A.; Wesseler, Justus; Berentsen, Paul B.M.
    Abstract: Isolation distances to limit the risk of cross-pollination from transgenic to nontransgenic crops can severely limit the potential use of transgenic crops through a socalled 'domino effect' where a field of non-transgenic crops limits adoption of transgenic crops not only on plots in its direct vicinity, but also in plots further away as its neighbors are forced to grow the non-transgenic varieties, forcing their neighbors to grow the non-transgenic variety, and so on. The extent to which this effect takes place, however, may depend crucially on the type of farm. For example, dairy farms can use grassland as a buffer between transgenic and conventional maize plots. This article assesses the effects of isolation distances for transgenic maize in dairy farming. A spatially explicit farm model is applied to a region in the Southern Netherlands to identify to what extent a single farmer (who uses non-transgenic maize) can limit other farmersâ potential to grow transgenic maize. The main findings are that 50% or more of the farms in the study area will not affect the potential adoption of transgenic maize by growing conventional maize at all. This result even holds under distance measures of 800m, which is the largest distance implemented by member states of the European Union. When they do have such effects, isolation distances can reduce the benefits from transgenic maize by â¬5,000 - â¬6,000, for a considerable part through a domino effect. Large net benefits of transgenic maize may limit the spatial effects as farmers are more willing to relocate maize production to areas where transgenic maize is allowed.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114595&r=agr
  76. By: Laroche, Dupraz C.; Postolle, A.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114402&r=agr
  77. By: Schleyer, Christian; Plieninger, Tobias
    Abstract: An important determinant of ecosystem services provision from European farmland is the amount and spatial arrangement of trees, shrubs, and woodlands that are integrated into the respective land use systems. Farm trees are considered âkeystone structuresâ of agroecosystems because of their disproportionally large ecological value (relative to their low abundance), but are threatened by agricultural intensification, land abandonment, and urbanization. While the preservation of farm trees is a component of several command-andcontrol approaches and while numerous payment schemes for ecosystem services (PES schemes) provided through agricultural practices do in general exist, there are few incentivebased policies that specifically target the conservation of farm trees. This paper uses an institutional economics framework for the analysis of PES schemes that enhance the establishment, protection, and management of farm trees. Using the German state of Saxony as a case, it elaborates on the reasons for the very reluctant participation of farmers in these schemes. The obstacles identified include high production and opportunity costs, contractual uncertainties, and land tenure implications. Further, since scheme adoption has been low compared with the total area covered by the respective farm tree types, the PES schemes alone cannot explain the substantial increase in number and size of some farm-tree types. Options to improve participation comprise regionalised premiums, result-oriented remuneration, and cooperative approaches. The example of PES schemes for farm trees highlights one of the major challenges for the protection and preservation of cultural landscapes: they are man-made and thus need to be preserved, managed, and maintained continuously.
    Keywords: Payments for ecosystem services (PES), agroecosystems, trees outside forests, institutional economics, East Germany, Saxony, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115992&r=agr
  78. By: Siddig, Khalid H.A.; Babiker, Babiker Idris
    Abstract: The traditional agriculture in Sudan occupies 60% of the total cultivated land and employs 65% of the agricultural population. Nevertheless, it is characterized by its low crop productivity, which is mainly driven by low technical efficiency, while drought and civil conflicts threaten most of its areas countrywide. Therefore, it has contributed only an average of 16% to the total agricultural GDP during the last decade. This paper addresses from an empirical point of view the sectoral and macroeconomic implications of agricultural efficiency improvement in Sudan and assesses the efficiency gains under the assumption of trade liberalization. Efficiency improvement experiments are implemented by augmenting the efficiency parameters of labor, capital, and land in a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) framework. The CGE model of the study relies on the newly produced Sudanese Social Accounting Matrix (SAM), which provides data on 10 agricultural sectors, 10 industrial sectors and 13 service sectors. Results show that improving the agricultural efficiency would lead to improvements in GDP, welfare level, and trade balance. In addition it would also improve the output and competitiveness of the Sudanese agricultural exports and increase their strength to face the challenges of liberalization.
    Keywords: Agricultural efficiency, liberalization, Sudan SAM, CGE analysis, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Consumer/Household Economics, Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty, Labor and Human Capital, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, D2, D5, D6, E1, E2, F1, F2, H2,
    Date: 2011–08–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:ukdawp:112786&r=agr
  79. By: Rousseau, Sandra; Vranken, Liesbet
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115986&r=agr
  80. By: Latruffe, Laure; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Moreira, Victor H.; Desjeux, Yann; Dupraz, Pierre
    Abstract: The major objective of this paper is to examine the association between agricultural subsidies and farm efficiency using data from the European Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) for operations specializing on dairy. The analysis covers the 18 year period going from 1990 to 2007 and includes the following seven countries: Denmark; France; Germany; Ireland; Spain; the Netherlands; and the United Kingdom. Separate translog stochastic input distance frontiers are estimated for each country. The key results show high average technical efficiency (TE) ranging from 91.8% to 94.9%, average rates of technological change going from -0.6% to 1.4%, and increasing returns to scale (1.24 to 1.44) across all seven countries. In addition, higher subsidy and hired labor dependence are found to be significantly associated with higher technical inefficiency across all seven countries. Moreover, the latest Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) regime introducing fully decoupled payments has reduced TE in all countries considered except Denmark.
    Keywords: Subsidies, CAP, technical efficiency, technological progress, returns to scale, Europe, dairy production, input distance frontiers, Livestock Production/Industries, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114396&r=agr
  81. By: Roesch, Andreas
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115984&r=agr
  82. By: Ujiie, Kiyokazu
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116094&r=agr
  83. By: Caracciolo, Francesco; Cembalo, Luigi; Cicia, Giovanni; Del Giudice, Teresa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Krystallis, Athanasios
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114321&r=agr
  84. By: Vincent Chatellier
    Abstract: This article provides an analysis of the European Commission’s proposals (18 Novembre 2010) regarding the next CAP reform. It proposes a reflection centered on the volatility of agricultural prices, the market regulation mechanisms and the risk management tools (the important question of direct payment to farmers is not included here). The first section deals with the factors underlying the volatility of agricultural prices, the effects of these factors on an international scale and ways of better managing volatility through enhanced international coordination of policies associated with agriculture. The second concerns the European tools that could be mobilised to accompany and support the envisaged strategies on a more global scale. Arguments are then developed around the following topics: customs duties, export refunds, safety nets, futures markets, fiscal policies and income stabilisation tools.
    Keywords: CAP, agricultural market, price volatility, risk, regulation instruments
    JEL: Q10 Q13 Q18
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rae:wpaper:201104&r=agr
  85. By: Van Herck, Kristine
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114829&r=agr
  86. By: Takacs-Gyorgy, Katalin; Erdelyi, Tamas; Sadowski, Adam
    Abstract: Land property, in the post socialist countries, was rebuilt in the beginning of the 90âs. The process went in different way in Poland and in Hungary. The different initial conditions are resulted in different development in the agricultural economy of these two countries. Now the agriculture had different characteristics. Despite of the fact that there are different elements of ownership structures, the importance of farm land leases is increasing in both evaluated countries. Regarding to the competitiveness of agriculture, Poland showed a developing tendency after the accession, but Hungary suffers from serious problems. The aims and means of agricultural policy have gone through numerous changes throughout the last fifty years in the history of the European Union and its predecessors. Specialties deriving from the characteristics of agricultural production and its structure have come continuously in the foreground when shaping the aims and means of the policy. The sustainable usage of natural resources is of augmented importance, which is basically based on the limitation of land usage and the introduction of various incentives. The (Axis 2) measures serve this objective by enhancing the utilization and protection of arable land. The land use is affected by all the above.
    Keywords: land ownership and rental, effects on tendencies, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116338&r=agr
  87. By: Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe; Schilizzi, Steven; Breustedt, Gunnar
    Abstract: This paper explores two ideas to enhance the performance of agri-environmental contracting schemes: linking contract payments to environmental outcomes and putting the contracts up for tender. This paper investigates whether there are any gains to be had by combining the benefits of both approaches. Controlled lab experiments were run in two countries, systematically varying the rate at which payments are linked to environmental outcomes. This paper clarifies the conditions under which the benefits from combining tenders with incentive payments outweigh the costs.
    Keywords: Conservation tenders, auctions, incentive contracts, agricultural policy, environmental policy, market-based instruments, experimental economics, Auktionen, Ausschreibungsverfahren, Agrar-Umweltverträge, Agrar-Umweltpolitik, Anreizverträge, experimentelle Ãkonomie, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Demand and Price Analysis, Political Economy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114523&r=agr
  88. By: Falkowski, Jan; Jakubowski, Maciej; Strawinski, Pawel
    Abstract: In order to stabilize and improve their income situation, rural households are strongly encouraged to diversify their activities both in and outside the agricultural sector. Most often, however, this phenomenon takes on only moderate proportions. This paper addresses issues of rural householdsâ income diversification in the case of Poland. It investigates returns from rural householdsâ income strategies using propensity score matching methods and extensive datasets spanning 1998-2008. Results suggest that returns from combining farm and off-farm activities were lower than returns from specialization, namely, concentrating on farming or on off-farm activities. Generally, farming seems to be the most attractive option for rural households and income difference between farmers and those who combine farming and off-farm activities increased after Poland joined the EU.
    Keywords: Income diversification, rural areas, propensity score matching, Poland, Community/Rural/Urban Development, D31, O15, Q12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114364&r=agr
  89. By: Esteve, Paloma; Varela-Ortega, Consuelo
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114337&r=agr
  90. By: Olper, Alessandro; Raimondi, Valentina; Cavicchioli, Daniele; Vigani, Mauro
    Abstract: This paper deals with the determinants of labour out-migration from agriculture across 153 EU regions over the 1990-2008 period. The central aim is to shed light on the role played by CAP payments on this important adjustment process. Using static and dynamic panel data methods, we show that standard neo-classic drivers, like the relative income and the relative labour share, represented significant determinants of the inter-sectoral migration of the agricultural labour. Overall, CAP payments have contributed significantly to job creation in agriculture, although the magnitude of the economic effect is quite small. Moreover, Pillar I subsidies have exerted an effect from three to five times stronger than Pillar II payments.
    Keywords: Out-farm Migration, CAP Payments, Labour Markets, Panel Data Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Labor and Human Capital, Q12, Q18, O13, J21, J43, J60,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114597&r=agr
  91. By: Fradj, Nosra Ben; Bourgeois, Cyril; Clodic, Melissa; Jayet, Pierre-Alain
    Abstract: This paper is devoted to assessment of policy mix impacts regarding nitrogen pollutants. The analysed policy combines a tax on the nitrogen input and incentives promoting perennial crops assumed to be low input ones. We show that perennial crop subsidy increases significantly the tax efficiency, compatible with the balanced budget of the Regulatory Agency in charge of the environment. Based on a MILP agricultural supply model, quantitative analysis provides assessment of impacts regarding land use, farmers income, and N losses at the North France level.
    Keywords: Bio-economic model, mathematical linear programming, environmental policy mix, N-fertilizer tax, bio-energy support, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114267&r=agr
  92. By: Bahta, Sirak Teclemariam; Berner, Anja; Offermann, Frank
    Abstract: A central problem in estimating per unit costs of production originates from the fact that most farms produce multiple outputs and standard farm-accounting data are only available at the whole-farm level. The seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) approach is used to estimate per unit production costs based on German farm accountancy data. Special emphasis is put on outlier detection prior to the estimation of production costs to increase the robustness of the results. Outlier observations are identified based on the Mahalanobis distance for each observation on the data set. It was observed that less negative cost coefficients are estimated after the exclusion of the outliers. The time series analysis of cost estimation based on SUR regression shows the costs of arable crops after 2004, affected by rising prices of fertilizer, seeds and energy, while the increase of livestock production costs after 2006 is attributed to feed costs.
    Keywords: Multi-output, outlier detection, production costs, Seemingly Unrelated Regression, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114233&r=agr
  93. By: Bakhsh, Khuda
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114234&r=agr
  94. By: Carmona-Torres, Carmen; Parra-Lopez, Carlos; Sayadi, Samir; Hinojosa-Rodriguez, Ascension
    Abstract: Olive agriculture represents one of the most important economic activities in the region of Andalusia, Spain. Additionally to its economic importance the multifunctional character of agriculture and its wide territorial presence entails that it has a high potential incidence in the environmental and social dimensions of the sustainable development of the region. Despite this importance, it is hypothesised and aimed to be contrasted that olive farmers are not implementing the agricultural practices optimal from an economic, environmental and social point of view. Contrasting this hypothesis entails to evaluate with a holistic and systemic approach the multiple impacts of the different technical alternatives to diverse agricultural practices. The use of the Analytic Network Process, a Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis technique, will be illustrated as a useful approach to deal with this kind of problems characterised by complexity, lack of information and risk. The study will focus on the average yield, climatic, environmental, etc., conditions of olive cultivation in Andalusia. The results seem to confirm the initial hypothesis when comparing the current situation with different scenarios of optimal technical alternatives. In particular the technical alternatives implemented nowadays they are far from being environmentally optimal. The multifunctional benefits and the technical costs of a change from the current situation to these optimal scenarios will be analysed.
    Keywords: Olive farming practices, Multifunctionality, Analytic Network Process, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114319&r=agr
  95. By: Kopecek, P.; Kopp, O.
    Abstract: This paper examines development of the Czech agriculture through profitability of the dairy - milk in time horizon 2002-2010. The analyse base of the methodology and the database published by Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information in Prague. The aim of the paper is to give an objective information about influence of agrarian policy on the development of milk production, especially with reference to comparison of changes in the pre-accession (period I = 2002-2003) and in the after-accession of CR to the EU with consistent producer prices of milk (period II = 2004-2008) and with reduced producer prices of milk (prediction of period III = 2009-2010). This deals with the economic position of Czech producers related to the most considerable livestock commodity of the Czech agriculture through 2 indicators, profitability without supports (R-S) and profitability with supports (R+S). There was proved that profitability R+S in the period I was negative for dairy sector. In connection with the membership of CR in EU agricultural supports significantly increased for dairy sector as the consequence of applying of Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on the Czech agriculture. Therefore there were monitored in the period II important positive changes of the indicator R+S for milk commodity. In the connection with the decrease of producer prices in the period III there was found important downgrade of this indicator. For the Czech Republic there were obtained following milk production values of R+S in the period I, resp. II and III 2,1 %, resp. 10,8 and â7,4 %.
    Keywords: Common Agricultural Policy, milk profitability, supports, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114708&r=agr
  96. By: Severini, Simone; Cortignani, Raffaele
    Abstract: European farmers face increasing income uncertainty and the debate is growing on the role of insurance schemes and of public support in this field. This debate is further stimulated by the perspective of introducing instruments to cope with risk also in the Common Agricultural Policy. Therefore, there is a need for empirical analysis and tools aimed at providing empirical evidences on this subject. This paper applies a PMP modelling approach that takes into explicit consideration risk aversion behaviour to test the possibility to use it to assess the implications of participating in a insurance scheme. This is done by introducing a revenue insurance scheme into a model developed on a small group of crop farms in Italy. In particular, a quadratic mix integer programming approach has been developed in order to model the choice of participating or not in the proposed insurance scheme. The model has been than used to conduct simulations considering changes in the level of the insurance premium. The paper tries to assess the soundness of the proposed approach and to identify its limitations. The obtained results suggest that this could be a useful tool to investigate the impact of participating in insurance schemes on production patterns and farm profitability and the role of public support in this field.
    Keywords: insurance schemes, PMP, farmersâ participation, risk aversion, non-linear mix-integer programming, Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty, Q12, C61, Q18,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116001&r=agr
  97. By: Hess, Sebastian
    Abstract: The global trend of industrializing agriculture increasingly transforms farms and firms into specialized component suppliers within a multi-stage food processing chain, which creates intraindustry trade between- and within geographical regions. This can be analyzed within the framework of a hypothetical multiregional food-processing firm that benefits from outsourcing of various âtasksâ to other sub-contracting regions, in order to utilize lower production cost there. This paper demonstrates how this can be modeled as a multi-output cost minimization problem of the processing firm, and it is argued that with respect to agriculture, the outsourcing opportunities for the firm are determined by economies of diversification. Trade is implicitly reflected as the movement of intermediate factors towards the processing firm, and firm-level specialization of the sub-contractors is an observable outcome. This framework is applied to pig production in 1155 municipalities in southern Germany that can be interpreted as âalmost firm-levelâ data. The estimated multi-output production frontier is decomposed according to a primal measure of diversification economies. Results show that pig farms located closer to slaughterhouses tend to specialize more in one of the tasks âpiglet productionâ, ârearingâ or âfatteningâ, while farms in regions distant from slaughterhouses tend to insource all of these tasks. Future research may extend the framework towards comparative static analyses of relevant policies.
    Keywords: Outsourcing, Trade of Tasks, Economies of Diversification, Pig Production, Schweineproduktion, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114509&r=agr
  98. By: Fellmann, Thomas; van Leeuwen, Myrna; Salamon, Petra
    Abstract: The potential accession of Turkey to the EU, and the related adoption of the CAP by Turkey, is expected to influence agricultural markets in both the EU and Turkey. The extent of the accession impacts depends on the one hand on the way the CAP will be implemented in Turkey, while on the other hand impacts are expected to be also shaped by macroeconomic conditions (like exchange rates, GDP growth and inflation levels). In this paper we provide a comprehensive model-based assessment of the potential impacts on agricultural markets of a Turkish accession to the EU. We first assess the impacts under the assumption of standard macroeconomic projections, then we analyse how a different TL/Euro exchange rate, a doubling of the Turkish inflation rate or a doubling of the Turkish GDP growth rate would influence the accession impacts. Results of the Turkish EU-membership simulation show that the impacts on agricultural markets in Turkey are significant, while effects on EU markets are rather limited. The main impact on Turkish agriculture is a reduction of producer prices. With market prices and produced quantities declining, and as the coupled Turkish direct payments and the input subsidies will be replaced by lower payments of the CAP, agricultural income is expected to be reduced especially for Turkish crop producers (except for tobacco). In contrast, accession effects on the Turkish livestock sector are projected to be positive, mainly due to lower feed costs. Furthermore, the demand levels of most commodities are projected to increase due to lower prices, thus Turkish consumers are expected to gain from an accession to the EU. The further analysis reveals that in particular a depreciation of the Turkish lira alters the results of the accession scenario.
    Keywords: Turkey, EU enlargement, agricultural markets, macro economy, AGMEMOD Zusammenfassung, Türkei, EU Erweiterung, Agrarmärkte, Makroökonomie, AGMEMOD, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114507&r=agr
  99. By: Luik, Helis; Omel, Raul; Viira, Ants-Hannes
    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to analyse productivity change of Estonian dairy farms during the period 2001-2009. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) was used to estimate the technical efficiency of producers and Malmquist productivity index for analysis of productivity change. Estonian FADN data was used in analysis. Performed analysis indicated that Estonian EU accession in 2004 increased considerably total factor productivity. Farm gate milk prices have considerable effect on total factor productivity change. Number of cows and milk yield has positive and dependence on subsidies, stocking density and capital to working hours ratio have negative effects on total factor productivity change.
    Keywords: Malmquist productivity index, technical efficiency, technical change, data envelopment analysis, dairy production, Livestock Production/Industries, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114583&r=agr
  100. By: Katchova, Ani L.; Woods, Timothy A.
    Abstract: This study examines the role that food consumer cooperatives play in the local food networks. Data are collected from three case studies with leading food cooperatives and a national survey of the general managers of food cooperatives. We identify the emerging business practices in local sourcing as a differentiation and member recruitment strategy for food cooperatives. Our analysis identifies several clusters of strategies used for local food procurement, based on the extent to which the co-op is involved in procurement activities upstream (at the farm), mid-stream (at the distribution center) or downstream (at the food cooperative). The results also show that when compared to other grocers, food co-ops have clear advantages in working with local producers and oftentimes play a key role in the producersâ business viability.
    Keywords: food consumer cooperatives, local foods, Agribusiness, Marketing, Q13,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114767&r=agr
  101. By: Hyytia, Nina
    Abstract: Further coordination and coherence of the EU funds and policies has been increasingly called for, implying that the territorial perspectives should be included as a major element in the future policies. In this paper, CAP modulation is considered in a framework of a regional development such that it compares the effects on modulation funds first, as they are allocated as income subsidies to farm related, diversified economic activities and second, as they are channeled from agriculture to increased regional investment demand. A rural-urban Social Accounting Matrix is used as a base year data for the CGE-model. The results suggest that transferring CAP payments from actual agriculture as income support to diversified activity does not promote rural development and economic activity measured at the regional level. Accordingly, traditional agriculture seems to be able to exploit the subsidies more efficiently. On the contrary, the investment shocks resulted in positive total impacts in terms of the gross regional domestic product and regional employment. However, the positive GDP impacts were greater in the urban area, thus suggesting possible agglomeration development.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114525&r=agr
  102. By: Anik, Asif Reza; Breustedt, Gunnar; Bauer, Siegfried
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114224&r=agr
  103. By: Marta-Costa, Ana Alexandra; Lourenco-Gomes, Lina
    Abstract: In a context of growing global threats, from climate change, the depletion and degradation of natural resources, to the recent global economic crisis, consequences of short and long term are being witnessed, which undermine the agriculture sustainability. The systems vulnerability, their inability to resilience and the need for innovation is observed, emphasizing also the most capable systems (more sustainable), offering new opportunities and encouraging more environmentally friendly practices. This work takes as starting point the evolution of economic, environmental and social parameters in farms, in recent years, in order to try to identify the difficulties and the solutions capable of sustaining agriculture in the context of multiple hazards at the farm level. The main methodology focuses on inquiries to the responsible agents for developing the main agriculture activities held in Trás-os-Montes, including farmers and their associations. The results confirm the dependence of production factors outside the farm, the limited availability and the high cost of manpower, the weakness of marketing channels and the poor organization of the sector as the main problems. Effective responses to these situations are the opportunities of the activities under study: (a) establishment of an organized marketing circuit, (b) strengthening of mutual help between farms, (c) collective use of inputs, (d) use of environmentally friendly production practices, (e) self-use of products produced on the farm, strengthening their autonomy. This work proposes the society valuation for different levels of agriculture intensity, through discrete choices methodology, to identify the real importance that society attributes to the agrarian activity.
    Keywords: Farming sustainability, swot analysis, proposals, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114368&r=agr
  104. By: Wang, Xiaobing; Yu, Xiaohua
    Abstract: Using a panel dataset from Zhejiang province in China over the period 1995-2002, we propose a two-step estimation procedure to investigate the links between land lease activity and production efficiency. We find that the output elasticity with respect to land, the scale effect and the technical efficiency are higher for farmers involved in land-lease activities. In addition, technical efficiency and land-lease activity are endogenous, and farmers with higher technical efficiency are more likely to lease more land and adopt advanced technologies to achieve higher profits, which in turn alters the technical efficiency.
    Keywords: Land Lease, Land Use Rights, Technical Efficiency, Scale Effect, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Q15, P23, D50,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115736&r=agr
  105. By: Luckmann, Jonas; Ihle, Rico; Grethe, Harald; Kleinwechter, Ulrich
    Abstract: Replaced with revised version of paper 09/14/11.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114376&r=agr
  106. By: Fernandez-Haddad, Zaira; Quiroga, Sonia
    Abstract: In this paper, we assess the output-oriented technical efficiency of agricultural production functions in order to compare, over time, economic and environmental production processes in the different regions of the Spanish Ebro basin, in a climate change context. The measurement of technical efficiency in agriculture can provide useful information about the competitiveness of farms and their potential to increase its productivity moreover can help in the crops adaptation to water pressure by improving the management of scarce resources. Here, we generate an agricultural water efficiency index to evaluate the adaptation of some Mediterranean crops to the water pressures in this area. We estimate frontier production functions and technical efficiency measures, using panel data models. This will allow us to observe changes in production due to individual specific effects and those that are time specific. To characterize our model, we use historical data, about crop yields, water requirements and climate as well as socio-economic and geographical aspects of the most representative crops in the provinces of the Ebro basin during 1976-2007. Then we generate a ranking of the most efficient crops across geographical areas, given their water use and other inputs, to evaluate policy scenarios with adjustments in water supply.
    Keywords: water efficiency index in agriculture, Ebro basin, climate change adaptation, Crop Production/Industries, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114358&r=agr
  107. By: Renwick, Alan W.; Jansson, Torbjorn; Verburg, Peter H.; Revoredo-Giha, Cesar; Britz, Wolfgang; Gocht, Alexander; McCracken, Davy
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114800&r=agr
  108. By: Ferto, Imre; Bakucs, Lajos Zoltan; Bojnec, Stefan; Latruffe, Laure
    Abstract: The article investigates the investment and financial constraints for French, Hungarian and Slovenian farms using FADN panel data with different econometric estimation approaches. Farm gross investment is positively associated with real sales growth and cash flow implying the absence of soft budget constraint. Gross farm investment is positively associated with investment subsidies. Specific results by country are found depending on farm indebtedness. Investment subsidies can mitigate some capital market imperfections in short-term, while on long-term what is crucial is farm sale ability to successfully compete in the output market gaining sufficient cash flow for farm competitive survival and investment.
    Keywords: farm investment, soft budget constraint, investment subsidy, panel data analysis, Agricultural Finance, D81, D92, O12, Q12, C23,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114357&r=agr
  109. By: Lehtonen, Heikki
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114390&r=agr
  110. By: Bobojonov, Ihtiyor; Sommer, Rolf
    Abstract: The paper compares the risk coping potential of insurances that are based on indices derived from weather (rainfall and temperature) data as well as from crop model and remote sensing analyses. Corresponding indices were computed for the case of wheat production in the Aleppo region of northern Syria, representative for agricultural production systems in many developing countries. The results demonstrate that weather derivatives such as the rainfall sum index (RSI) and the rainfall deficit index (RDI) have a very good potential for coping with risk in semiarid areas. Crop simulation model index (CSI) on the other hand could serve as an alternative to RSI and RDI when historical farm yield data is not available or not reliable. In such cases we simulated historical yields using the CropSyst cropping system simulation model. Remote sensing data could be used to establish index insurances where weather stations are sparsely located and (daily time step) weather data thus not available. The study analyzes two indexes estimated from the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI): (1.) the farm level NDVI (FNDVI) and (2.) the area level NDVI (ANDVI). FNDVI may have a very high potential for securing farm revenues, but may be prone to moral hazard since farm management changes and subsequent gains or losses in crop production are directly revealed by the NDVI when high resolution images are used. Therefore, we recommend ANDVI for developing countries since the index is estimated for the whole agricultural zone similar to traditional area-yield insurances.
    Keywords: risk management, index insurance, alternative index, CropSyst, NDVI, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114256&r=agr
  111. By: Halmai, Peter; Vasary, Viktoria
    Abstract: Rural development in the European Union has to face several challenges. Negative effects of old and new challenges (if these challenges are not faced effectively) might enhance and accelerate those processes that are taking place slowly for the present but that are definitely irreversible. On the basis of sector-specific approach problems related to agriculture should be focused on. It has to be, however, highlighted that there is an ongoing paradigm change: there is a shift from the agricultural policy aiming at food self sufficiency and income parity towards a sustainable rural policy with spatial focus. The shift itself is considered a continuous challenge, too. The following questions as objectives of the paper arise: - Are there policy instruments that could accelerate the paradigm change, enhance the spread of ânew rural economiesâ? - What is the relation between the priorities of the rural development in the European Union and the spatial (or territorial) approach? - Is there a way to create such an agricultural policy which itself is able to face more effectively the new rural challenges? - At which level should be found the solutions to problems including finding the necessary financial resources â national or Community level? In what way could be reallocated the necessary resources of an integrated rural policy? The paper intends to analyze and systematize the challenges facing the rural economy/rural development both from the point of view of sectoral and territorial approach. It is aimed at analyzing and assessing adequate policy instruments and justified financial tools which could strengthen the integrated rural policy. The authors apply the theory of new rural paradigm, new rural economy, the concept of multifunctional agriculture, European added value and common rural policy.
    Keywords: common agricultural policy, new rural paradigm, European added value, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Q01, Q18, Q28, Q57,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115547&r=agr
  112. By: Arfini, Filippo; Donati, Michele
    Abstract: The paper approaches the problem of assessing the impacts of market and rural development policies oriented at stimulating the growth and spread of organic farming in Italy. From the methodological perspective, an innovative formulation of Pmp is presented and discussed; it is applied to a set of farms belonging to the FADN sample, specifically located in Emilia Romagna and Sicily. The Pmp model has the capacity to estimate the impact of policies on crops not yet present at the time the farm data was recorded. From the empirical standpoint, various sets of policies are simulated on cluster of farms both conventional and in course of conversion in organic production.
    Keywords: Organic products, PMP, CAP, Farm Management, Q12, C61, Q18, C38,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114229&r=agr
  113. By: Rantamaki-Lahtinen, Leena; Vare, Minna
    Abstract: In earlier studies, past succession is found to contribute positively to the farm growth. However, there is lack of information on how are the farms succeeding after the starting phase. In this study, it is analysed how farmers that have recently started their farm enterprise differ from more experienced farmers in some key farm management areas such as farm and farmer characteristics, strategic objectives and development plans. The data were collected by postal survey from Salo region in South-Western Finland. In the study, farmers are divided in to three different groups according to the farmerâs age and experience. According to the results, early phase farmers are in certain areas better equipped than older generations. They have better education and better networks than others. Moreover, the younger entrepreneurs consider their networks more important than their senior colleagues. Like expected, at early phase farmers had invested significantly more and have more liabilities than the others. In addition, the early phase farmers are the most active also for developing their farms. The late phase farmers were the least active, even if they were going to have succession within the next years. This might be problem-atic for the successor, too. However, in order to improve the viability of whole farming sector, the farms should be developed as continuum.
    Keywords: farm management, multivariate data analysis, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116096&r=agr
  114. By: Myyra, Sami; Pietola, Kyosti
    Abstract: This paper tests for the extent of moral hazard problem within a Crop Damage Compensation (CDC) program that is similar to traditional multi peril crop insurances but is publicly funded and openly accessible for all farmers in Finland. We further estimate the potential of using the observed farmer and farm characteristics in ranking and classifying farms according to their incidence towards losses when they are protected. The data are the claimed and granted indemnity payments for each farm over the fifteen year period of 1995-2009. These data are complemented by data on total farm population in 2005. The data suggest that most of the farmers (60%) have not made any claims in the CDC program over the 15 year period. Those farms that claimed compensation did so typically either once or twice within the 15 year period. Nevertheless, a substantial number of farmers have claimed and also granted indemnity payments more regularly than can be justified by the exogenous (aggregate level) yield distributions. Based on the logit models, farmers and farms with certain observed characteristics are more inclined to the losses than the others. In general presence of animals declines the probability of crop damage. However, the existence of different animals on the farm classifies the farms by their inclination to collect crop damage compensations. In addition, the fixed municipality effects are significant indicating that the persons in charge for appraising the losses implement different standards
    Keywords: Farm Management, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114632&r=agr
  115. By: Schader, Christian; Lampkin, Nic; Christie, Mike; Stolze, Matthias
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115991&r=agr
  116. By: Yu, Wusheng; Jensen, Hans G.
    Abstract: Existing literature on the 2007/8 food price crisis focuses on the causes and poverty and hunger consequences of the crisis and seems to be less concerned with the interactions of different policy measures applied by governments. As such, the relative effectiveness, interactions and costs of these policy actions are often not satisfactorily explored. This paper provides a first preliminary quantitative assessment on the individual and joint effects of Chinaâs short term trade policy actions and existing domestic support measures on domestic market prices, outputs, trade flows and farm income, using a global CGE model characterized with detailed and up-to-date policy information for China in the year of 2008. A series of interesting results emerge from our simulations. First, Chinaâs agricultural outputs for many products are estimated to be boosted by up to 1.8 percentage by all the policy interventions combined, indicating that the extra domestic support in 2008 (relative to the pre-crisis level) is able to compensate for the lowered outputs due to the short term trade policy measures. The most stringent export restriction placed on wheat, however, reduces agricultural incentive so much that the observed domestic support measure is not able to compensate the lost domestic production. Second, while both the short term trade policy measures and existing domestic measures are able to reduce domestic market price, roughly two-thirds of the price reductions are due to the increased spending on the domestic measures. Third, the domestic market price reduction effects of the observed policy measures are shown to be large and significant, relative to the observed agriculture and food price indexes in China in 2008. Lastly, while China seems to be quite successful in tackling the food price inflation issue using a combination of policy measures, the fiscal and efficiency costs are not negligible, especially if one considers the extra government spending on the input subsidies necessitated by the insulating trade and border policy measures.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115970&r=agr
  117. By: Grundmann, Philipp; Ehlers, Melf-Hinrich; Uckert, Gotz
    Abstract: Agricultural bioenergy production faces dynamics such as yield fluctuations, volatile prices, resource competition, new regulation and policy, innovation and climate change. To what extent is bioenergy production able to adapt to changing environments and to overcome critical events? We investigate in detail how the agricultural bioenergy sector in the German State of Brandenburg adapted to diverse past events. The analysis rests on the adaptive-cycle concept of HOLLING and GUNDERSON (2002a), which has been widely applied in socialecological systems research. Brandenburgâs bioenergy production displays properties of a system in the exploitation phase, including a low potential and a high resilience of the system and a low connectedness within the system. There are risks and opportunities for bioenergy production. Sustainable bioenergy production requires a transition from the exploitation to the conservation phase. But Brandenburgâs bioenergy sector has limited adaptive capacity and there are certain barriers for the agricultural bioenergy sector to overcome potentially critical states. Policy needs to be tailored accordingly.
    Keywords: Adaptive cycle, agricultural bioenergy, potential, resilience, connectedness, critical states, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, Financial Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114726&r=agr
  118. By: Vandeplas, Anneleen
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115545&r=agr
  119. By: Baldi, Lucia; Peri, Massimo; Vandone, Daniela
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114237&r=agr
  120. By: Dedehouanou, Senakpon; Maertens, Miet
    Abstract: This paper uses the framework of subjective wellbeing in order to analyze the welfare implication of rural households involved in modern agri-food supply chain in Senegal. It is argued that small farmers are increasingly excluded from high value commodities chain. There is also evidence that despite increasing standards, vegetable export chain can improve rural householdsâ welfare through contract farming or by the creation of employment. As an alternative and complementary framework, this paper uses self reported happiness instead of the commonly income-based measure to assess the household welfare. We deal with the potential selection bias of participation. We find that participation in modern agri-export chain as contract farming is not related to happiness. Rather, participation as agro-industry employee is positively and significantly correlated to happiness. There is also no evidence concerning income and relative income effect on happiness. We provide some explanations.
    Keywords: Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114447&r=agr
  121. By: von Schlippenbach, Vanessa; Teichmann, Isabel
    Abstract: This paper highlights the strategic role retailers private quality standards play in food supply chains. Considering two symmetric downstream …rms that are exclusively supplied by a …nite number of upstream …rms and letting the upstream …rms decide which retailer to supply, we show that there exist two asymmetric equilibria in the downstream …rms quality requirements. The asymmetry is driven by both an increase in the retailers buyer power and the retailers competition for suppliers. The use of private quality standards induces a decrease in social welfare, which can be softened by the implementation of a public minimum quality standard.
    Keywords: Private Quality Standards, Vertical Relations, Buyer Power, Food Supply Chain, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Industrial Organization,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114519&r=agr
  122. By: Djuric, Ivan; Goetz, Linde; Glauben, Thomas
    Abstract: This paper analyzes how the market interventions of the Serbian government during the food crisis 2007/2008, inter alia a de facto export ban, have affected domestic wheat markets. Besides a comprehensive description of the crisis policy and its effects on the Serbian wheat market, we investigate how it influences the equilibrium and stability of the Serbian wheat market and its integration with the world market within a price transmission model. Applying a Markov-switching error correction model to weekly wheat grower prices in Serbia and world market prices, two states of the wheat market are identified. Our results suggest that although the long-run price elasticity did not change during the crisis, the market equilibrium was disrupted and the market stability reduced. Also, we find that the price dampening effect of the export restrictions was only short-lived, and that Serbian wheat grower prices even increased above the world market level.
    Keywords: international market integration, Markov-Switching Error Correction Model, Serbia, wheat market, world market price transmission, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, C34, Q11, Q13, Q17, Q18,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114438&r=agr
  123. By: Olearius, Gotz; Roosen, Jutta; Drescher, Larissa S.
    Abstract: German food retailing is characterized by fierce competition among retail chains for consumer shopping. This paper considers the switching behaviour using data of white dairy product purchases. The empirical investigation uses survival analysis approach, in particular hazard analysis. The results extend the knowledge of shopping behaviour by providing a new set of explaining variables and the importance of the first store, defined as store with the major share of household budget, becomes apparent. On average, households buy dairy products 42 times per year. Thereof only 21 % are retail chain switches. Generally a high customer loyalty is visible in this investigation. It is shown that switching behaviour is widely influenced - amongst others - by percentage of private label products, percentage of special offers and price consciousness.
    Keywords: switching behaviour, store choice, store loyalty, hazard analysis, food retailing, Geschäftsstättenwahl, Geschäftsstättenwechsel, Einkaufsverhalten, Hazard Analyse, Lebensmitteleinzelhandel, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Industrial Organization,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114516&r=agr
  124. By: Elsholz, Rudiger; Harsche, Johannes
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114342&r=agr
  125. By: Gschwandtner, Adelina; Hirsch, Stefan
    Keywords: Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114534&r=agr
  126. By: Ciaian, Pavel; Pokrivcak, Jan; Szegenyova, Katarina
    Abstract: In this paper we estimate the impact of CAP subsidies on farm bank loans. According to the theoretical results, if subsidies are paid at the beginning of the growing season they may reduce bank loans, whereas if they are paid at the end of the season they increase bank loans, but these results are conditional on credit constraint and on the relative cost of internal and external financing. In empirical analysis we use the FADN farm level panel data for period 1995-2007. We employ the fixed effects and the GMM models to estimate the impact of subsidies on farm loans. The estimated results suggest that (i) subsidies influence farm loans and the effects tend to be non-linear and indirect; (ii) both coupled and decoupled subsidies stimulate long-term farm loans, but the long-term loans of big farms increase more than those of small farms due to decoupled subsidies; (iii) the short-term loans are affected only by decoupled subsidies, and they are altered by decoupled subsidies more for small farms than for large farms; however (v) when controlling for the endogeneity, only the decoupled payments appear to affect loans and the relationship is non-linear.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114289&r=agr
  127. By: Kimura, Shingo; Anton, Jesus
    Abstract: This paper analyzes the effectiveness and efficiency of farm income stabilization program such as AgiStability in Canada. This program intends to mitigate farm income fluctuations, which is seemingly more neutral to the farming decision than the payments that are countercyclical with price or revenue, or that are commodity specific. However reduction of income variability generate responses in farmersâ risk management strategies, and most often generate crowding out effects of other strategies such as insurance or diversification. Stochastic analysis of risks and payments is combined with a micro economic model of endogenous risk management decision under uncertainty to explore the interactions between them. The part of the program that is triggered with small margin reductions of 15-30% (frequent normal risk) is found to have the strongest crowding out effects; the most catastrophic part of the payments (when margins are negative) is paid too late for being an effective disaster assistance; the middle range part of the program enters in competition with AgriInsurance, the subsidized insurance program. In all, this program is a socially more acceptable form of supporting farmers, rather than an efficient risk management tool.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114755&r=agr
  128. By: Jan, Pierrick
    Abstract: In view of a probable free trade agreement between Switzerland and the European Union in the agricultural and food sector and as a consequence of their actual low competitiveness in international comparison, Swiss dairy farms are under pressure to increase their productivity. In the present contribution I assess the total factor productivity (TFP) change in the period 1999-2008 of a balanced panel of 118 dairy farms located in the mountain region using the Malmquist productivity index. Particular attention is paid thereby to the issue of deflation quality for monetary input and output variables, and to the consideration of direct payments. The yearly average TFP growth rate of the sample of farms investigated amounts to 1% and is very close to the levels observed in European countries showing some similarities with Switzerland from an agricultural perspective. There seems thus to be some initial evidence that Swiss dairy farms located in the mountain region can keep up with their European counterparts in terms of TFP growth. However, due to the actual productivity gap existing between Swiss farms and their European counterparts, higher TFP growth would be necessary for the Swiss farms to increase their competitiveness in a European comparison.
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114455&r=agr
  129. By: Rheinberger, Christoph M.; Hammitt, James K.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114813&r=agr
  130. By: MacDonald, James M.
    Abstract: Agricultural production continues to shift to larger farms in the U.S. I show that the shift is persistent over time, large, and ubiquitous across commodities. I review theories of farm size, and classify three channels for analysis: 1) scale effects, through technological economies and managerial diseconomies; 2) the roles of relative factor prices and factor shares; and 3) policy and institutions. Finally, I evaluate the empirical evidence on the forces driving structural change, distinguishing between crops and livestock because of important differences in the role of scale economies and coordination, and I offer some directions for the future.
    Keywords: Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:115361&r=agr
  131. By: Casasnovas, Valero L.; Aldanondo, Ana Maria
    Abstract: Determining the competitive position of dairy farms depends on several technological, economic and institutional variables. Among them, are remarkable those related to animal feeding in the current context of high variability on prices. In this context, the aim of our study is to analyze the effects on milk supply and the competitiveness of dairy farms with different models of land intensification, with greater reliance on market purchases or self production of livestock feed. Our work is based on an econometric approach to a variable cost function, in a fixed effects model for unbalanced panel data of specialized dairy farms in Navarre (Spain). From this region, we use 3 geographical areas in relation to the availability of grazing land. It has been tested the absence of sample selection bias and satisfaction of regularity conditions. The study shows a flexible milk farm supply with respect to the price of milk and very dependent on the evolution of feed prices. This aspect has been emphasized by the restructuring of farms, characterized by strong size increases and productivity gains based on a greater reliance on purchases of animal feed. The provision of grazing land has an important role in determining the average costs and farm profitability. In addition, grazing land use permits greater exploitation of economies of scale present in the dairy sector.
    Keywords: multiproduct cost function, panel data, milk, animal feed, dairy farms, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114316&r=agr
  132. By: Bonnet, Celine; Mouzon, Olivier de
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114261&r=agr
  133. By: Sumelius, John; Islam, K.M. Zahidul; Sipilainen, Timo
    Abstract: This paper measures profit efficiency and examines the effect of access to microfinance on the performance of rice firms in Bangladesh. An extended Cobb-Douglas stochastic frontier profit function was used to assess profit efficiency and profit loss of rice farmers in Bangladesh in a survey data of 360 farms throughout the 2008-2009 growing seasons. Model diagnostics reveal that serious selection bias exists that justifies the uses of sample selection model in stochastic frontier models. After effectively correcting for selectivity bias, the mean profit efficiency of the microfinance borrowers and non-borrowers were estimated at 68% and 52% respectively, thereby suggesting that a considerable share of profits were lost due to profit inefficiencies in rice production. The results from the inefficiency effect model show that householdsâ age, extension visits, off-farm income, region and the farm size are the significant determinants of inefficiency. Some indicative policy recommendations based on these findings have been suggested.
    Keywords: Stochastic frontier function, Profit efficiency, Selection bias, Bangladesh, Microfinance, Agricultural Finance, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116067&r=agr
  134. By: Nocella, Giuseppe; Stefani, Gianluca; Romano, Donato
    Abstract: Lack of consumer trust and communication strategies are probably the main determinants of information failure in modern food markets. This study attempts to tackle these aspects affecting the quality of food information by investigating questions related to what topics are more relevant to consumers, who should disseminate trustful food information, and how communication should be conveyed. Primary data were collected both through qualitative (in depth interviews and focus groups) and quantitative research. Quantitative research was conducted by means of a questionnaire administered in 2006-2007 to a sample of Italian respondents using both a web and a traditional mail survey. Reading preferences, willingness to pay and trust towards public and private sources conveying information through a hypothetical food magazine were assessed combining factor analysis, choice modelling and a criterion-based market segmentation. The study shows that reading preferences of Italian consumers can be summarized along three dimensions: agro-food system, enjoyment and wellness. Furthermore, willingness to pay for receiving food-related information is influenced by trust towards the type of publisher, which plays also a key role in market segmentation together with socio-demographic and economic variables such as gender, age, presence of children and income. Policy implications of these findings are discussed.
    Keywords: food information, trust, preference heterogeneity, segmentation, Italy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, D12, D18, D89, Q18,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114606&r=agr
  135. By: Li, Zhigang; Yu, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yinchu
    Abstract: costs: Evidence from Chinese agricultural traders
    Keywords: Transportation Costs, China, Agricultural Traders, Infrastructure, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114384&r=agr
  136. By: Coderoni, Silvia; Esposti, Roberto
    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114426&r=agr
  137. By: Yen, Steven T.; Tan, Andrew K.G.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115969&r=agr
  138. By: Martinovska-Stojcheska, Aleksandra; Surry, Yves R.
    Abstract: This paper examines the production and productivity growth of Macedonian agriculture. Furthermore, having in mind the distinctive dual structure of Macedonian agriculture, this study investigates the differences in productivity surplus between family farms and agricultural companies. In the period from 1998 to 2008, the sector experienced an increase in terms of volume with an average annual rate of 0.8%, and a productivity or growth rate of 0.7% per annum. The partial productivity of the production factors generally increased throughout the whole period. The productivity growth mainly originated from the increase in agricultural output prices and was distributed to the input suppliers. Additionally, an important benefit was received by family labour with 1.5% of the surplus. Family farms proved to be more consistent in production and productivity growth, despite their small and heterogenic features. In contrast, the production and productivity levels at agricultural companies seem to follow a decreasing trend. The decision makers should consider the source and allocation of productivity gains when formulating the agricultural and rural development policy. This approach also provides ground for monitoring and assessment of the policy, through measurement of the distribution of the increasing governmental support and the EU pre-accession funds.
    Keywords: productivity gains, surplus accounts, Macedonian agriculture, Farm Management, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114667&r=agr
  139. By: Roeder, Norbert; Osterburg, Bernhard
    Abstract: Roughly 6.5% of the German utilized agricultural area is located on organic soils (fens and bogs). Nevertheless, the drainage of these areas in order to allow their agricultural utilization causes roughly a third of the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) of the German agricultural sector, being equivalent to 4% of the total German GHG emissions. Obviously, German policies trying to reduce the GHG emissions successfully must tackle this issue. The abandonment of the cultivation of organic soils would be an effective policy to reduce the GHG emissions however the question remains whether it is an efficient measure compared with the other options? In the paper we assess the mitigation costs on the basis of the standard gross margin and tenure of the agriculturally used peatlands and with the results obtained from sector model RAUMIS. Without engineering and transaction costs the mitigation costs are in the magnitude of 10 to 45 ⬠per to of CO2eq. This makes rewetting of peatlands at least in the medium and long run a fairly efficient options for reducing GHG emissions, especially as the implications on the sector due to reallocation affects are fairly small.
    Keywords: GHG-Mitigation, Landuse, peatland, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115983&r=agr
  140. By: Vanzetti, David; Nikolic, Aleksandra
    Abstract: Bosnia Herzegovina (BH) is in the process of joining the World Trade Organization in the near future and the European Union in the medium term. As a net agriculture and food importer, accession will require BH to expose some of its inefficient and sensitive agricultural industries, such as meat and dairy products, to international competition. A bilateral trade model is used to estimate the potentially negative impacts of accession on production and trade in several specific sectors. According to the research results, BH imports are estimated to increase, driven by the livestock products sector. Exports are only marginally affected. A drop in overall customs revenues is expected. BH is expected to experience a small reduction in agricultural sector welfare following accession to the EU or the WTO. The implications for poverty are likely to be negative, especially for meat producers. On the other hand the main beneficiaries will be the consumers. This presumes that lower border prices are passed through to domestic consumers.
    Keywords: Bosnia Herzegovina, WTO accession, trade, agricultural tariffs, Agribusiness, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114611&r=agr
  141. By: Verhees, Frans J.H.M.; Lans, Thomas; Verstegen, Jos A.A.M.
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115548&r=agr
  142. By: Cechura, Lukas; Hockmann, Heinrich
    Keywords: Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114314&r=agr
  143. By: Kaditi, Eleni A.
    Abstract: This paper examines whether ownership and increased competitive pressure affect food retailersâ market power, analysing whether all actors involved in the food supply chain deviate from the pricing behaviour that exists under perfect competition. A method proposed by Roeger (1995) is used to estimate price-cost margins, relaxing the assumptions of perfect competition and constant returns to scale. The obtained results show that foreign investments and consolidation have a positive and significant impact on the market power of food processors and retailers. Food processors, agricultural producers and wholesalers have lower price-cost margins than retailers, which suggests that these actors price closer to marginal costs being more concerned with maximising social welfare or that the former have higher costs than retailers. The results are robust to various estimation techniques and specifications.
    Keywords: Price-cost mark-ups, multinational firms, retailing, Agribusiness, F23, L13, L81,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114452&r=agr
  144. By: Staudigel, Matthias
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:116065&r=agr
  145. By: Eija, Pouta; Sami, Myyra; Kyosti, Pietola
    Abstract: Land improvements with long pay-back periods are often delayed on leased agricultural land, resulting in social costs through land degradation, decreased land productivity and environmental problems. An important question is thus how landowners would respond to regulations and mandates concerning land improvements. Based on a landowner survey, we analyse landowner choices under certain land improvement regulations, using the currently dominant choice of leasing land for agricultural use as the benchmark. The results indicated that land leasing will continue to increase in the future, but if the landowner mandate to co-finance costly land improvements is increased, landowners are predicted to respond significantly to these mandates and search for other land management options. Three heterogeneous landowner groups were identified based on their land use choices. Current leasers and amenity owners, in particular, were sensitive to land improvement mandates, and would avoid compulsory investment expenses by selling or afforesting their land.
    Keywords: contingent behaviour, latent class model, landlord, land use, heterogeneity, Land Economics/Use, Q15, Q24, Q28,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114770&r=agr
  146. By: Mtimet, Nadhem; Ujiie, Kiyokazu; Kashiwagi, Kenichi; Zaibet, Lokman; Nagaki, Masakazu
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114642&r=agr
  147. By: Wakeyo, Mekonnen B.; Gardebroek, Cornelis
    Abstract: Rain-fall shortage constrains production in small-holder agriculture in developing countries and with ongoing climate change these shortages may increase. Rain-water harvesting are interesting technologies that decrease this risk. Therefore, one would expect an increasing use of these technologies in drought-prone areas. However, data collected in Ethiopia shows that the share of irrigated land in total landholding declines with farm size. This study investigates why the share declines with farm size using panel data collected in 2005 and in 2010. A random-effect tobit model is estimated for the share of irrigated land as a function of variables affecting returns, market prices, source of finance and expectation formation. The findings show farm-specific factors such as credit per hectare, distance to market, ease of selling output, landholding, regional differences, aridity and distance of plots from natural water sources significantly affect the share. Thus, encouraging investment has to consider farm-size, and also geographical, environmental and regional diversity.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115735&r=agr
  148. By: O'Toole, Conor M.; Newman, Carol; Hennessy, Thia C.
    Abstract: This paper uses a fundamental Q model of investment to consider the role played by nancing frictions in agricultural investment decisions, controlling econometrically for censoring, heterogeneity and errors-in-variables. Our ndings suggest that farmer's in- vestment decisions are not driven by market fundamentals. We nd some evidence that debt overhang restricts investment but investment is not dependent on liquidity or internal funds. The role of nancing frictions in determining investment decisions changes in the post-nancial crisis period when debt overhang becomes a signicant impediment to farm investment. The evidence suggests that farmers increasingly rely on internal liquidity to drive investment. Finally, we nd no evidence that farmers use o-farm capital to fund on-farm investment.
    Keywords: Credit Constraints, Firm Level Investment, Tobin's Q, Debt, Agricultural Finance, G31, G32, F34,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114568&r=agr
  149. By: Hockmann, Heinrich; Gataulina, Ekaterina; Hahlbrock, Konstantin
    Abstract: The paper investigates the significance of external and internal transaction costs and risk in agriculture in the Tatarstan Republic. The analysis is conducted for independent farms and farms which are members of agroholdings. The result indicates that external transaction costs are more marked in independent farms than in agroholding members. However, average prices do not differ among the organisational forms. With regard to internal transaction costs (or inefficiency) the result is the opposite. Inefficiency in agroholding members is considerably higher than in independent farms. However, the estimation suggests that this result is due to more intense risk management in agroholding members. Thus, members of a business group have a more intense use of inputs; however, these are rather allocated to reduce uncertainty of production than to increase production.
    Keywords: Risk production function, internal and external transaction costs, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Industrial Organization, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Q110, D220, P230,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114510&r=agr
  150. By: Bougherara, Douadia; Gassmann, Xavier; Piet, Laurent
    Abstract: We designed a field experiment involving real payments to elicit farmersâ risk preferences. Farmers are a very interesting sample to study since risk has always played an important role in agricultural producersâ decisions. Besides, European farmers may face more risky situations in the future. In this context, it is very important for any economic analysis focusing on agriculture to correctly assess farmersâ behaviour in the face of different sources of risk. We test for two descriptions of farmersâ behaviour: expected utility and cumulative prospect theory. We use two elicitation methods based on the procedures of Holt and Laury (2002) and Tanaka et al. (2010) on a sample of 30 French farmers. The experiment consists in asking subjects to make series of choices between two lotteries with varying probabilities and outcomes. We estimate parameters describing farmersâ risk preferences derived from structural models. We find farmers are slightly risk averse in the expected utility framework. In the cumulative prospect theory frame, we find farmers display either loss aversion or probability weighting, tending to overweight small probabilities and to underweight high probabilities. In our study, expected utility is not a good description of farmersâ behaviour towards risk.
    Keywords: Risk Attitudes, Field Experiment, Farming, Risk and Uncertainty, C93, D81, Q10,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114266&r=agr
  151. By: Hahlbrock, Konstantin; Hockmann, Heinrich
    Abstract: The impact of group affiliation to agroholdings on enterprise performance in terms of productivity and efficiency is controversially discussed in the literature. However, only few papers evaluate the effects of group membership on the productivity and efficiency of agricultural enterprises in Russia. The underlying research question of this paper is therefore whether farms that belong to agroholdings perform better than independent farms. We calculate partial land and labor productivity, total factor productivity (TFP) and technical efficiency scores for the two categories of independent farms and members of agroholdings. In this paper a production function approach is estimated in the framework of stochastic frontier analysis. The results are used to decompose TFP into a technological change effect and a technical efficiency effect. The results show a different trend than observed in previous studies. We show that the growth of agroholdingsâ TFP exceeds by far the development of the TFP of independent farms and that group affiliation has a positive impact on the performance of farms.
    Keywords: Agroholding, Stochastic Frontier Analysis, Efficiency, Total Factor Productivity, Russia, Agroholding, Stochastic Frontier Analysis, Effizienz, Total Factor Productivity, Russland, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114508&r=agr
  152. By: Schmitz, Christoph; Lotze-Campen, Hermann
    Abstract: Like agricultural trade, deforestation has increased tremendously throughout the past five decades. We analyse the linkage between both factors by applying trade and forest policy scenarios to the global land-use model MAgPIE ("Model of Agricultural Production and its Impact on the Environment"). The model predicts global landuse patterns in a spatially explicit way and uses endogenously derived technological change and land expansion rates. Our study is the first which combines global trade analysis with a spatially explicit mapping of deforestation. By implementing self-sufficiency rates in the regional demand and supply equations, we are able to simulate different trade settings. Our baseline scenario fixes current trade patterns until the year 2045. The three liberalisation scenarios assume a path of increasing trade liberalisation which ends with no trade barriers in 2045 and they differ by applying different forest protection policies. Regions with comparative advantages like Latin America for oilcrops and China for cereals will export more. Whereas, Latin America will buy this competitiveness by converting large parts of its Amazonian rainforest into cropland, China will benefit most due to its decreasing food demand after 2025. In contrast, regions like the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia face the highest increases of imports. Forest protection policies lead to higher technological change rates. In absence of such policies, investments in agricultural Research & Development are the most effective way for protecting the forest.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115993&r=agr
  153. By: Demont, Matty; Zossou, Esperance; Rutsaert, Pieter; Ndour, Maimouna; Mele, Paul Van; Verbeke, Wim
    Abstract: In Benin, traditional parboiling is still widely practiced among rice processors, resulting in inferior grain quality. A new parboiler was introduced to improve the milling yield and quality of local rice. We conducted Vickrey second price auctions followed by a consensus session to elicit rural Beninese consumersâ willingness to pay for rice obtained through the new parboiler and two locally innovated parboilers. Relative to traditionally parboiled rice, consumers were willing to pay price premiums of 9â13% for rice obtained through a local parboiler using a container of which the bottom is a perforated metal, 27% for rice obtained through a local parboiler using wooden sticks at the bottom of the pot, and 25â34% for rice parboiled through the improved parboiler. Bids were influenced by the presentation order of the products according to perceived quality. Bids were also higher when participants had been informed on the benefits of improved parboiling techniques, a crucial insight for developing marketing and communication strategies for this improved quality product.
    Keywords: sub-Saharan Africa, food processing, experimental auction, food quality, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114443&r=agr
  154. By: Kellermann, Magnus; Salhofer, Klaus
    Abstract: This paper analyzes technical efficiency and productivity growth of dairy farms in southern Germany. We compare the performance of farms operating on permanent grassland and conventional farms using fodder crops from arable land. Using a latent class stochastic frontier model, intensive and extensive production systems are identified for both types of farms. We estimate stochastic output distance functions to represent the production technology. TFP change is calculated and decomposed using a generalized Malmquist productivity index. Our results show that grassland farms can in general keep up with conventional farms. The productivity on intensive (extensive) grassland dairy farms grew by 1.15% (0.93%) per year, compared to 1.19% (intensive) and 1.0% (extensive) on conventional farms.
    Keywords: productivity, dairy farming, stochastic frontier analysis, Livestock Production/Industries, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114763&r=agr
  155. By: Bamiere, Laure; David, Maia; Vermont, Bruno
    Abstract: The aim of this paper is to compare different policy instruments for cost-effective habitat conservation on agricultural lands, when the desired spatial pattern of reserves is a random mosaic. We use a spatially explicit mathematical programming model which studies the farmers' behavior as profit maximizers under technical and administrative constraints. Facing different policy measures, each farmer chooses its land-use at the field level, which determines the landscape at the regional level. A spatial pattern index (Ripley L function) is then associated to the obtained landscape, indicating on the degree of dispersion of the reserve. We compare a subsidy per hectare of reserve with an auction scheme and an agglomeration malus. We find that the auction is superior to the uniform subsidy both for cost-efficiency and for the spatial pattern of the reserve. The agglomeration malus does better than the auction for the spatial pattern but is more costly.
    Keywords: agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, mathematical programming, spatial optimization, reserve design, cost-eciency, Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, H23, Q57, Q12, Q28,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114239&r=agr
  156. By: Janssen, Meike; Hamm, Ulrich
    Abstract: Organic food is often labelled with an organic certification logo to gain consumer trust in the product integrity. The number of different organic certification logos in the European market raises the question whether consumers prefer specific logos over others. The aim of this paper is to analyse consumersâ willingness-to-pay (WTP) for different organic logos to give recommendations for actors in the organic sector. Choice experiments and structured interviews were conducted with 2,441 consumers of organic food in six European countries. The data was analysed with random parameter logit models. We found great differences between the tested logos regarding the price premium that consumers were willing to pay. The highest WTP was recorded for well-known logos that consumers perceived as credible with high production standards and a strict control system. It is thus recommended for suppliers of organic food to label products with an organic logo preferred by consumers. Organisations owning an organic logo should put effort into measures for increasing consumer awareness of the logo and forming consumer perceptions of the certification scheme behind it.
    Keywords: Organic logos, willingness-to-pay, credence goods, random parameter logit models, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114454&r=agr
  157. By: Chemak, Fraj
    Abstract: In order to cope with the water scarcity, Tunisia has to manage efficiently the water demand of the economic and social sectors mainly that of the agricultural irrigated activities. Within this context, this investigation aims to analyze the technical efficiency, the water use efficiency and the dynamic of the productivity of the irrigated areas in the Sidi Bouzid region. Farm surveys have been carried out during 2003 and 2007 cropping years and technology performance has been assessed using Data Envelopment Analysis approach. Malmquist index has been also computed in order to characterize the productivity change. Empirical findings showed that the technical efficiency of the farms has increased by 17% during this period leading to an improvement of the water use efficiency up to 22%. Both, the technical efficiency change as well as the technical change reveal a positive impact on the productivity change. However, in 2007, the water use efficiency was only 78%. Therefore, farmers have to improve further their irrigated practices in order to save more water.
    Keywords: Irrigated Area, Technical Efficiency, Water Use Efficiency, Productivity Change, Data Envelopment Analysis, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114311&r=agr
  158. By: Gomez, Carlos Mario; Gutierrez, Carlos
    Abstract: In this paper we analyze the conditions under which increasing technical efficiency of water use in the agricultural sector might not reduce water demand and pressures on water ecosystems. Departing from this basic problem we discuss how policy measures performed to enhance water productivity in the agriculture might be transformed into effective alternatives to improve the conservation of water resources and then guarantee the successful implementation of the Water Framework Directive. A preference revelation model is presented in the third section of the paper and one empirical application to an irrigation district in southern Spain is used in the fourth section to discuss the effectiveness of water savings measures.
    Keywords: Water Framework Directive, Water Economics, Agricultural Economics, Simulation Models, Preference Revelation., Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114622&r=agr
  159. By: Kumbhakar, Subal C.; Lien, Gudbrand; Hardaker, J. Brian
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114673&r=agr
  160. By: Falco, Salvatore Di; Veronesi, Marcella
    Abstract: This study investigates the impact of climate change adaptation on farm householdsâ downside risk exposure (e.g., risk of crop failure) in the Nile Basin of Ethiopia. The analysis relies on a momentbased specification of the stochastic production function. We estimate a simultaneous equations model with endogenous switching to account for the heterogeneity in the decision to adapt or not, and for unobservable characteristics of farmers and their farm. We find that (i) climate change adaptation reduces downside risk exposure, i.e., farm households that implemented climate change adaptation strategies get benefits in terms of a decrease in the risk of crop failure; (ii) farm households that did not adapt would benefit the most in terms of reduction in downside risk exposure from adaptation; and (iii) there are significant differences in downside risk exposure between farm households that did and those that did not adapt to climate change. The analysis also shows that the quasi-option value, that is the value of waiting to gather more information, plays a significant role in farm householdsâ decision to adapt to climate change. Farmers that are better informed may value less the option to wait to adapt, and so are more likely to adapt than other farmers.
    Keywords: adaptation, climate change, endogenous switching, Ethiopia, risk exposure, stochastic production function, skewness, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Risk and Uncertainty, D80, Q18, Q54,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115549&r=agr
  161. By: de Gorter, Harry; Drabik, Dusan; Just, David R.
    Abstract: This paper analyzes carbon leakage due to reduced emissions from deforestation (RED). We find that leakage with RED is good because the policy induces afforestation that contributes to a further carbon sequestration. By ignoring the domestic component of carbon leakage, the literature can either overestimate or underestimate leakage, depending on the magnitudes of the numerator and the denominator of the leakage formulas. Unlike the literature, we include the land and agricultural markets in the analysis of carbon leakage with forestation policies. In this model, carbon leakage depends on: (1) supply and demand elasticities of timber production and consumption, respectively in the country introducing a RED policy (Home country) and in the rest of the world; (2) Home countryâs production and consumption share in the world timber production and consumption, respectively; (3) prices of land and crop products in the Home country and the rest of the world; (4) initial allocation of land between forestry and agriculture; (5) share of total forest area set aside under RED; and (6) relative carbon sequestration potential of the forest planted on an afforested land and of the forest withdrawn from timber harvest. These potentials depend heavily on the forest species as well as on timing of the policy, and on the discount rate and time path of increasing carbon prices.
    Keywords: carbon leakage, forestry, reduced emissions from deforestation, afforestation, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q23, Q24, Q54,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114450&r=agr
  162. By: Helming, John F.M.; van Meijl, Hans; Woltjer, Geert B.; Jansson, Torbjorn; Nowicki, Peter; Tabeau, Andrzej A.
    Abstract: Following the paradigm for reforming the current CAP, the first objective of this study is to give insights into the economic impact of post-2013 CAP measures at different levels of aggregation (e.g. EU, Member State and region). The post-2013 CAP measures included are directed towards income for the farmers, competitiveness, valuable areas and ecosystem services. The second objective is to analyse the impact of a scenario that combines the above mentioned post-2013 CAP measures. This study can be seen as a first attempt to quantify the transition to a CAP with more targeted measures at the European level and reveals considerable methodological and data challenges. A key finding is that the impact of the various measures is very different with regard to various economic indicators.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114550&r=agr
  163. By: Blanchard, Pierre; Huiban, Jean-Pierre; Mathieu, Claude
    Keywords: Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114526&r=agr
  164. By: Bakucs, Lajos Zoltan; Ferto, Imre; Latruffe, Laure; Desjeux, Yann; Soboh, Rafat; Dolman, Mark
    Abstract: Technical efficiency has long been analysed as a measure of farm performance, however most studies are restricted to a single country case. This paper presents a comparative analysis of field crop and dairy farm performance across eight EU countries, including two New Member States (NMS), focusing on long run stability and mobility patterns. The main research question is how relative performance of farms fluctuates over time, i.e. whether poorly performing farms remain always inefficient whilst some farms are always very efficient. Results show that on average 60% of farms maintain their efficiency ranking in two consecutive years, whilst 20% improve and 20% worsen their positions, for all countries. Due to the unstable economic conditions, farms in NMS are more mobile than those in EU15.
    Keywords: Farm technical efficiency, SFA, FADN, stability analysis, Farm Management, P52, Q12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114235&r=agr
  165. By: Vollenweider, Xavier; Falco, Salvatore Di; O'Donoghue, Cathal
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:115553&r=agr
  166. By: Demeter, Robert Milan; Bovenhuis, Henk; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard; Lansink, Alfons G.J.M. Oude; Meuwissen, Miranda P.M.; van Arendonk, Johan A.M.
    Abstract: The objective of the study was to assess the farm level economic implications of valueadding genetic selection strategies to improve milk fat composition. Selection based on a quantitative trait (ratio of total saturated to total unsaturated fatty acids in milk) or a known genotype (for the DGAT1 gene) was considered. Technical and economic performance of hypothetical herds were computed by a herd optimization and simulation model. It was assumed that the herds are already bred for the specific milk composition, and the transition period was not considered. Correlated effects of the selection scenarios on milk production, female fertility, and functional longevity traits were accounted for. Results showed that increasing the total unsaturated fatty acids in milk by traditional selection leads to lower net revenue, whereas selection based on DGAT1 genotype results in slightly higher net revenue. Our results, therefore, suggest that genetic selection based on DGAT1 genotype is a more profitable strategy for dairy farmers than selection based on phenotypes for SFA/UFA ratio.
    Keywords: dairy cattle, genetic selection, milk composition, farm economics, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114444&r=agr
  167. By: Bicknell, Kathryn
    Abstract: Over the past few decades the relative price of eggs has fallen dramatically in New Zealand. This has been made possible, at least in part, by the application of increasingly intensive agricultural practices. However, there is also growing pressure from consumers and animal rights groups around the world to ban the use of conventional/barren cages for egg production on animal welfare grounds. In this paper a simple partial equilibrium model is used to provide a preliminary estimate of the welfare effects of moving to alternative housing systems for egg laying hens in New Zealand. Results indicate that in a market where demand is relatively inelastic and trade is restricted for sanitary reasons, the cost of improving hen welfare will be born largely by consumers. This raises difficult distributional issues, as market research indicates that nearly 80% of the eggs currently sold in New Zealand supermarkets are cage eggs, and the heaviest purchasers of eggs are those with large families and limited budgets.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nzar11:115418&r=agr
  168. By: Sipilainen, Timo; Huhtala, Anni
    Abstract: Targeted environmental policies for farmlands may improve the cost-efficiency of conservation programs if one can identify the farms that produce public goods, or environmental outputs, with the least cost. We derive shadow values of producing crop diversity on conventional and organic crop farms to examine their opportunity costs of conservation. Non-parametric distance functions are estimated by applying data envelopment analysis to a sample of Finnish crop farms for the period 1994 â 2002. Our results show that there is variation in the shadow values between farms and the technologies adopted. The extent of cost heterogeneity and farmsâ potential for specialization in the production of environmental outputs determine whether voluntary programs such as auctions for conservation payments are economically reasonable.
    Keywords: biodiversity, Shannon index, DEA, distance functions, shadow values, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, C21, D24, H41, Q12, Q24,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114527&r=agr
  169. By: Natanelov, Valeri; Alam, Mohammad J.; McKenzie, Andrew M.; Van Huylenbroeck, Guido
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114626&r=agr
  170. By: Pennings, Joost M.E.; Wansink, Brian; Hoffmann, Arvid O.I.
    Abstract: A conceptual marketing-finance framework is proposed which links channel contracting in agriculture and the use of financial facilitating services (e.g., financial derivatives) to (shareholder) value creation. The framework complements existing literature by explicitly including channel contract relationships as market-based assets that can be managed to reduce cash flow volatility and hence increase shareholder value. We show how financial facilitating services (e.g., derivatives) can be used to complement the cash flows components of channel contract relationships thereby further reducing the risk adjusted cost of capital and improving shareholder value. In a field study of producers, wholesalers, and processors, in the potato and meat industry the framework shows how shareholder value can be enhanced by using financial facilitating services, such as derivatives, to complement marketing channel relationships. Moreover, this study shows how producers and managers from agribusiness companies can use such financial services as conflict-solving tools in case of incongruent contract preferences between channel members.
    Keywords: marketing-finance, agricultural marketing strategy, decision-making, channels, Agribusiness, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2011–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114785&r=agr
  171. By: Keil, Alwin; Saint-Macary, Camille; Zeller, Manfred
    Abstract: Income growth and urbanization in developing countries have enlarged markets for highvalue agricultural commodities. However, there are concerns that lacking access to physical, financial, and human capital, as well as infrastructure and institutions limit the ability of the poor to participate in and benefit from such commercial agricultural activities. There may further be a trade-off between wealth enhancing effects of intensive commercial agriculture and adverse long-term effects on farmersâ livelihoods due to natural resource degradation. This study provides empirical evidence on these crucial issues and derives related policy recommendations using the example of Vietnam. Here, economic growth has boosted the demand for animal products and, consequently, commercial maize production for animal feed purposes especially in erosion-prone upland areas. Using data from mountainous Yen Chau district in north-western Vietnam, the main objective of this paper is to investigate the degree of farmersâ engagement in commercial maize production and the determinants of their land allocation decision, whereby a special focus is laid on the poorest farm households. We find that maize covers most of the sloping uplands and generates the lionâs share of farmersâ cash income. The poorest farmers are particularly specialized in commercial maize production, but they are highly dependent on relatively disadvantageous input supply and marketing arrangements offered by maize traders. Although farmers in all wealth groups are well aware of soil erosion, effective soil conservation measures are rarely practiced. Due to the trade-off between short-term wealth enhancing effects of maize production and lacking sustainability we propose a two-pronged policy approach that comprises (1) measures aimed at enhancing the short-term profitability of maize production for the poorest farmers while reducing the associated market related risks and (2) measures aimed at enhancing both the economic and ecological sustainability of land use in the long run through the promotion of economically attractive soil conservation options that may gradually evolve into a more diversified land use system.Einkommenswachstum und zunehmende Verstädterung in Entwicklungsländern haben zu einer Ausweitung von Märkten für hochwertige Agrarprodukte geführt. Es gibt jedoch Bedenken, dass die Armen in ihrer Möglichkeit an derartigen kommerziellen landwirtschaftlichen Aktivitäten teilzunehmen und von ihnen zu profitieren durch mangelnden Zugang zu physischem, finanziellen und Humankapital, sowie Infrastruktur und Institutionen beschränkt sind. Zudem mögen die wohlfahrtssteigernden Effekte intensiver kommerzieller Landwirtschaft mit durch Degradierung natürlicher Ressourcen hervorgerufenen negativen Langzeitwirkungen auf die Existenzgrundlage von Kleinbauern konfligieren. Die vorliegende Studie liefert empirische Erkenntnisse zu diesen wichtigen Fragen am Beispiel von Vietnam und leitet entsprechende Politikempfehlungen ab. In Vietnam beflügelt Wirtschaftswachstum die Nachfrage nach Tierprodukten und damit den 2 kommerziellen Maisanbau zu Futterzwecken vor allem in erosionsanfälligen Bergregionen. Das Hauptziel dieses Aufsatzes ist es anhand von Daten aus dem bergigen Distrikt Yen Chau in Nordwestvietnam zu untersuchen, in welchem Umfang die dortigen Bauern kommerziellen Maisanbau betreiben und welche Faktoren sie bei ihrer Landallokationsentscheidung beeinflussen, wobei spezielles Augenmerk auf die ärmsten bäuerlichen Haushalte gelegt wird. Unsere Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Mais auf einem GroÃteil der Hanglagen angebaut wird und den Löwenanteil der bäuerlichen Bareinkommen generiert. Die ärmsten Bauern sind in besonderem MaÃe auf den kommerziellen Maisanbau spezialisiert, sie hängen jedoch stark von relativ nachteiligen Vereinbarungen mit Maishändlern für die Bereitstellung von Inputs und der Vermarktung ab. Obwohl Bauern aller Einkommensschichten sich der auftretenden Bodenerosion sehr wohl bewusst sind, werden effektive BodenschutzmaÃnahmen kaum praktiziert. Aufgrund des Zielkonfliktes zwischen dem kurzfristigen, wohlfahrtssteigernden Effekt der Maisproduktion und ihrer mangelnden Nachhaltigkeit plädieren wir für einen zweigleisigen Politikansatz. Dieser umfasst (1) MaÃnahmen, die die kurzfristige Rentabilität des Maisanbaus für die ärmsten Bauern erhöhen, während gleichzeitig Marktrisiken vermindert werden, und (2) MaÃnahmen, die die ökonomische und ökologische Nachhaltigkeit der Landnutzung langfristig durch die Förderung wirtschaftlich attraktiver Bodenschutzoptionen erhöhen, die sich schrittweise zu einem diversifizierteren Landnutzungssystem weiterentwickeln könnten.
    Keywords: Agricultural commercialization, maize cultivation, sustainability, Tobit regression, Vietnam, Landwirtschaftliche Kommerzialisierung, Maisanbau, Nachhaltigkeit, Tobit-Regression, Vietnam, Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114487&r=agr
  172. By: Sauer, Johannes; Gorton, Matthew; White, John
    Abstract: Drawing on survey data, this paper identifies the determinants of variations in farm gate milk prices for three CIS countries (Armenia, Moldova and Ukraine). We apply a multi-level modeling approach, specifically a bootstrapped and selectivity bias corrected mixed-effects linear regression model. The analysis suggests three main strategies for farmers to improve the price received for their output: consolidation, cooperation and stable supply chain relationships. While selling through a marketing cooperative has a significant and positive effect on farm gate milk prices, the majority of non-members are reluctant to join. The size of dairy operations, trust and contracting also impact positively on the prices received by farmers. Policy implications are drawn. Basierend auf Umfragedaten identifiziert diese Studie Faktoren für eine Variation im Rohmilchpreis für verschiedene CIS Staaten (Armenien, Moldawien und die Ukraine). Es wird ein multi-level Modellierungsansatz verwandt in der Form eines mixed-effects Regressionsmodells unter Berücksichtigung eines möglichen Sampleselektionsfehlers (sample selection bias). The Analyse zeigt die folgenden Strategien für eine mögliche Realisierung eines höheren Rohmilchpreises auf: Konsolidierung, Kooperation und stabile Supply Chain Beziehungen. Während der Verkauf über Marketingkooperative einen signifikanten und positiven Effekt auf den Rohmilchpreis aufweist, ist die Mehrheit der Nichtmitglieder nicht zu einem Beitritt bereit. Die Betriebsgrösse, Vertrauen sowie vertragliche Bindungen zeigen ebenso einen positiven Einfluss auf den vom Milchbauern erzielten Absatzpreis. Entsprechende Politikimplikationen werden formuliert.
    Keywords: Price Heterogeneity, Milk, Cooperatives, Armenia, Moldova, Ukraine, Preisheterogenität, Milch, Kooperative, Armenien, Moldawien, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, O13, P32, Q13,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:gewi11:114489&r=agr
  173. By: Bamiere, Laure; Martinet, Vincent; Gouel, Christophe; Lecadre, Elodie
    Abstract: Within an overall project to assess the ability of the agricultural sector to contribute to bioenergy production, we set out here to examine the economic and technological viability of a bioenergy facility in an uncertain economic context, using the stochastic viability approach. We consider two viability constraints: the facility demand for lignocellulosic feedstock has to be satisfied each year and the associated supply cost has to be lower than de profitability threshold of the facility. We assess the viability probability of various supplying strategies consisting in contracting a given share of the feedstock demand with perennial dedicated crops at the initial time and then in making up each year with annual dedicated crops or wood. The demand constraints and agricultural prices scenarios over the time horizon are introduced in an agricultural and forest biomass supply model, which in turns determines the supply cost per MWh and computes the viability probabilities of the various contract strategies. A sensibility analysis to agricultural prices at initial time is performed. Results show that when they are around or under the median (of the 1993â2007 prices), the strategy consisting in contracting 100% of the feedstock supply with perennial dedicated crops is the best one.
    Keywords: Biofuel, Biomass production, Spatial economics, Stochastic viability, Monte Carlo simulation, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114238&r=agr
  174. By: Dhehibi, Boubaker
    Abstract: The objective of this paper is to measure productive efficiency of irrigation water efficiency based on the concept of technical efficiency and compared among different sizes farms in Tunisia. The proposed methodology is applied to a randomly selected sample of 144 citrus growing farms and differentiated by size (small, medium and large farms). A stochastic production frontier approach, based on Battese and Coelliâs (1995) inefficiency effect model, is used to obtain farm-specific estimates of technical and irrigation water efficiency. The last step of the analysis consists on the identification of the factors influencing irrigation water efficiency differentials across citrus growing farms. Empirical results show that estimated mean technical efficiency ranges from a minimum of 12.82% to a maximum of 90.69% with an average estimate of 67.73%. This result means that 32.3% increase in production is possible with the present state of technology and unchanged input uses, if technical inefficiency is completely removed. Thus, improving technical efficiency will result to significant increases in framerâs revenue and profit. On the other hand, mean irrigation water efficiency is found to be 53%, which is much lower than technical efficiency and also exhibits greater variability ranging from 1.6% to 98.87%. Estimated mean irrigation water efficiency implies that the observed quantity of marketable citrus could have been maintained by using the observed values of other inputs while using 47.0% less of irrigation water. This means that farmerâs can achieve significant savings in water use by improving irrigation system technologies.
    Keywords: Water Efficiency, stochastic frontier production function, small, medium and large citrus farms, Tunisia, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114441&r=agr
  175. By: Hahlbrock, Konstantin; Hockmann, Heinrich
    Abstract: The impact of group affiliation to agroholdings on enterprise performance in terms of productivity and efficiency is controversially discussed in the literature. However, only few papers evaluate the effects of group membership on the productivity and the efficiency of agricultural enterprises in Russia. The underlying research question of this paper is therefore whether farms that belong to agroholdings perform better than independent farms. We calculate partial land and labor productivity, total factor productivity and technical efficiency scores for the two categories of independent farms and members of agroholdings. In this paper a production function approach is estimated in the framework of stochastic frontier analysis. The results are used to decompose total factor productivity into a scale effect, a technological change effect and a technical efficiency effect. The results show a different trend than observed in previous studies. The growth of agroholdings total factor productivity exceeds by far the development of the independent farms and that group affiliation has a positive impact on the performance of the farm.
    Keywords: Agroholding, Stochastic Frontier Analysis, Efficiency, Total Factor Productivity, Russia, Productivity Analysis,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114579&r=agr
  176. By: Rat-Aspert, Olivier; Krebs, Stephane
    Abstract: The control of animal diseases is an issue of particular interest in animal production chains. Because of their direct impact on production, animal diseases generate income shortfalls for farmers. In some cases, diseases may also have lead to human health problems and undermine market access conditions. Because of these potential negative impacts, some diseases are regulated. But for many communicable diseases, much latitude is given to individual control of the disease by farmers. In the case of a communicable disease, individual management therefore generates an externality, as individual decisions have an impact on the level of risk exposure of other farms to the disease. Thus, the collective result of individual management may differ from the collective expectations. This gap can be reduced by collective actions. The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for the study of collective management of animal diseases, which will provide management tools to collective managers of animal health. The development of this conceptual framework rests on three steps. We first discuss the means to model the individual decisions of farmer in regard to animal diseases. Then it should take into account the interaction between the epidemiology of the disease and the individual decisions of farmers, by the coupling of epidemiologic and economic models. Finally, collective management tools are introduced in these models in order to test incentives schemes for horizontal coordination. Finally, collective actions are introduced in these models, in order to test devices for horizontal coordination (management of prevalence between farms).
    Keywords: Animal health economics - Micro modelling â Bio-economic modelling - endemic animal diseases, Animal health economics, Micro modelling, Bio-economic modelling, endemic animal diseases, Livestock Production/Industries,
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaae11:114791&r=agr

This nep-agr issue is ©2011 by Angelo Zago. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.