nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2011‒04‒16
106 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
University of Verona

  1. Adoption of Conservation Agriculture Technologies by Smallholder Farmers in the Shamva District of Zimbabwe: A Tobit application By Chiputwa, Brian; Langyintuo, Augustine S.; Wall, Patrick
  2. Impact of United States Corn-based Ethanol Production on Land Use By Sobowale, Folakemi; Dicks, Mike; Campiche, Jody
  3. Effect of Cover Crop Adoption on Nitrogen Use among Conventional and Organic Corn Farms â An Empirical Analysis By Chintawar, Sachin; Gabrielyan, Gnel; Westra, John
  4. Investigating the Redundancies in Current Farm Programs By Knapek, George M.; Richardson, James W.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Raulston, J. Marc
  5. A Categorical Data Analysis on Risks in Agriculture By Uematsu, Hiroki; Mishra, Ashok K.
  6. Reasons for Adopting Precision Farming: A Case Study of U.S. Cotton Farmers By Pandit, Mahesh; Mishra, Ashok K.; Paudel, Krishna P.; Larkin, Sherry L.; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.; Larson, James A.; Velandia, Margarita M.; Roberts, Roland K.; Kotsiri, Sofia
  7. Customizable Area Whole Farm Insurance (CAWFI) By Chalise, Lekhnath; Coble, Keith H.; Barnett, Barry J.
  8. Determinants of Swine Farm Sale Prices Under a de facto Moratorium By Zering, Kelly; van der Hoeven, Guido; Kotsiri, Sofia
  9. Motivation for Technology Adoption and Its Impact on Abandonment: A Case Study of U.S. Cotton Farmers By Uematsu, Hiroki; Mishra, Ashok K.; Roberts, Roland K.; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.
  10. Consumers' Perception of Sustainably Produced Food: The case of local and organic production technologies By Whorton, Carly S.; Amanor-Boadu, Vincent
  11. The Role of Specialty Food Stores and Farmers' Markets in the Procurement of Local Foods By Wixson, Sarah E.; Katchova, Ani L.; Woods, Timothy A.; Hu, Wuyang
  12. Local Food Procurement and Promotion Strategies of Food Cooperatives By Katchova, Ani L.; Woods, Timothy A.
  13. The Farm Level Impacts of Replacing Current Farm Programs with a Whole Farm Revenue Program By Raulston, J. Marc; Richardson, James W.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Knapek, George M.
  14. The Effectiveness of Dairy Risk Management at Managing Income, Revenue, and Margin Risk By Herbst, Brian K.; Anderson, David P.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Richardson, James W.
  15. Got (Safe) Milk? Chinese Consumersâ Valuation for Select Food Safety Attributes By Ortega, David L.; Wang, H. Holly; Wu, Laping; Bai, Junfei; Olynk, Nicole J.
  16. Producers and Consumer attitudes toward Biotechnology in Ghana By Nsafoah, Annie; Dicks, Michael R.; Osei, Collins
  17. Impact of Ethanol Policies on Livestock Production in the United States By Miljkovic, Dragan; Shaik, Saleem; Braun, Dane
  18. Effects of a Traceability System on the Economic Impacts of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak By Jones, Jason; Carlberg, Jared; Pendell, Dustin L.
  19. "Buying Local" Means "Selling Local" - Using a Transportation Alliance of environmental and Food Horticulture Producers in Georgia By Stegelin, Forrest; Houston, Jack E.; Compte, Javier Mantilla; Thomas, Paul; Chappell, Matthew
  20. Optimal Coverage Level Choice with Individual and Area Plans of Insurance By Bulut, Harun; Collins, Keith; Zacharias, Thomas P.
  21. Taxpayer Preferences for Farm Policy and USDA Budget Expenditures By Ellison, Brenna; Lusk, Jayson L.; Briggeman, Brian
  22. Farmers’ Preferential Choice Decisions to Alternative Cassava Value Chain Strands in Morogoro Rural District, Tanzania By Sewando,, Ponsian T.; Mdoe, N. Y. S.; Mutabazi, K.D.S
  23. Agricultural Nutrient Nonpoint Source Credits: A Comparison of State Crediting Procedures By Latane, Annah; Stephenson, Kurt
  24. Farmers' Perceptions about Spatial Yield Variability and Precision Farming Technology Adoption: An Empirical Study of Cotton Production in 12 Southeastern States By Kotsiri, Sofia; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Marra, Michele C.; Velandia, Margarita
  25. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates and Switchgrass Production on Hay Markets By Acheampong, Kwame; Dicks, Michael R.; Adam, Brian D.
  26. Analysis of Factors Affecting Farmersâ Willingness to Adopt Switchgrass Production By Qualls, D. Joshua; Jensen, Kimberly L.; English, Burton C.; Larson, James A.; Clark, Christopher D.
  27. Livestock Market Integration and Price Discovery: Case of Mali By Bizimana, Jean Claude; Bessler, David A.; Angerer, Jay P.
  28. The Effect of Water Use and Water Availability on Net Revenues and Optimal Cropping Patterns on the Texas High Plains By Wright, Andrew P.; Hudson, Darren
  29. The Impact Of Climate Change On Agriculture By K, Sudarkodi; K, Sathyabama
  30. Adoption and Profitability of Breeding Technologies on United States Dairy Farms By Khanal, Aditya R.; Gillespie, Jeffrey M.
  31. The Impacts of Farm Size and Economic Risk on No-Till Rice Whole-Farm Profitability By Watkins, K. Bradley; Hignight, Jeffrey A.; Anders, Merle M.
  32. Intensive versus Extensive Dairy Production Systems: Dairy States in the Eastern and Midwestern U.S. and Key Pasture Countries the E.U.: Determining the Competitive Edge By Nehring, Richard F.; Sauer, Johannes; Gillespie, Jeffrey; Hallahan, Charles
  33. HYBRID RICE AND ITS IMPACT ON FOOD SECURITY AND THE PATTERN OF GLOBAL PRODUCTION AND TRADE By Durand-Morat, Alvaro; Wailes, Eric J.; Chavez, Eddie C.
  34. Factors Influencing Successful Small-Farm Operations in North Carolina By Yeboah, Anthony K.; Owens, John Paul; Bynum, Jarvetta S.
  35. An Analysis of the Banana Import market in the U.S. By Su, Chia-Hsien; Ishdorj, Ariun; Leatham, David J.
  36. ANALYSIS OF U.S. RICE POLICY IN A GLOBAL STOCHASTIC FRAMEWORK By Chavez, Eddie C.; Wailes, Eric J.
  37. Community Food Store Types Availability is Associated with Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in North Carolina By Adu-Nyako, Kofi; Okafor, Ralph
  38. Weather Derivatives as Risk Management Tool in Ecuador: A Case Study of Rice Production By Vedenov, Dmitry; Sanchez, Leonardo
  39. Efficiency Measure in Nitrogen Management under U.S. Trade Induced Corn Production By Yeboah, Osei; Gunden, Cihat; Allen, Albert; Akuffo, Akua S.
  40. Macroeconomic Effects of the Stock Management for Irrigation and Drainage Facilities in Japan: Application of Recursive- Dynamic CGE model By Kunimitsu, Yoji
  41. Rift Valley Fever: An Economic Assessment of Agricultural and Human Vulnerability By Hughes-Fraire, Randi; Hagerman, Amy D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Gaff, Holly
  42. Distributional implications of climate change in India By Jacoby, Hanan; Rabassa, Mariano; Skouas, Emmanuel
  43. Agriculture and the clean development mechanism By Larson, Donald F.; Dinar, Ariel; Frisbie, J. Aapris
  44. Measurements of Agricultural Productivity and Efficiency Gains from NAFTA By Yeboah, Osei; Gunden, Cihat; Shaik, Saleem; Allen, Albert; Li, Tongzhe
  45. The Recession and its Impact on Foreign Direct Investment Flows into the Food System of Less Developed Countries By Babool, Md. Ashfaqul Islam; Saghaian, Sayed
  46. Estimation of a Composite Food Demand System for the United StatesâA Revisit By Luo, Haobo; Huang, Chung L.; Lin, Biing-Hwan
  47. Climate Variability and Agricultural Productivity: Evidence from Southeastern US By Solis, Daniel; Letson, David
  48. Profitability of Irrigated Improved Pecan Orchards in the Southern Plains By Springer, Job; Swinford, Wyatt; Rohla, Charles
  49. Effects of No-Tillage Production Practices on Crop Yields as Influenced by Crop and Growing Environment Factors By Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; English, Burton C.; Roberts, Roland K.; de la Torre Ugarte, Daniel G.; West, Tristram O.
  50. Pre-harvest Forecasting of County Wheat Yield and Wheat Quality Conditional on Weather Information By Lee, Byoung-Hoon; Kenkel, Philip L.; Brorsen, B. Wade
  51. Economic Potential of Using High Tunnel Hoop Houses to Produce Fruits and Vegetables By Donnell, Jeri; Biermacher, Jon T.; Upson, Steve
  52. Economic Analysis of High Fertilizer Input, Over-seeded Clover and Native Pasture Production Systems in the Texas Coastal Bend By Falconer, Lawrence L.; Evers, Gerald W.; Ribera, Luis A.
  53. The Effects of Domestic Offset Programs on the Cotton Market By Pan, Suwen; Hudson, Darren; Mutuc, Maria
  54. Evaluation of Crop Insurance Yield Guarantees and Producer Welfare with Upward Trending Yields By Adhikari, Shyam; Knight, Thomas O.; Belasco, Eric J.
  55. Factors Impacting Participation In and Purchases Made by Members of the Oklahoma Food Cooperative By Holcomb, Rodney B.; Kenkel, Philip L.
  56. Adaptation to Climate Change: Land Use and Livestock Management Change in the U.S. By Mu, Jianhong H.; McCarl, Bruce A.
  57. Potential Biomass Yields in the South Central US By Basnet, Arjun; Depona, Theo; Hedges, Wesley; Dicks, Michael R.
  58. Alabama Restaurant Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Local Food: A Choice Based Approach By Reynolds-Allie, Kenesha; Fields, Deacue
  59. The Impact of Spatial Heterogeneity in Land Use Practices and Aquifer Characteristics on Groundwater Conservation Policy Cost By Willis, David B.; Stovall, Jeff; Johnson, Jeffrey W.; Rainwater, Ken; Barbato, Lucia S.; Mulligan, Kevin; Fish, Ernest B.
  60. Imperfect Competition between Milk Manufacturers and Retailers in a Midwestern State in the U.S. By Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Stiegert, Kyle W.
  61. Poverty dynamics, ecological endowments and land use among smallholders in the Brazilian Amazon By Gilvan Guedes; Mariângela Antigo; Ana Flávia Machado; Eduardo Brondízio; Leah VanWey
  62. The Impact of Biofuels on the Propensity of Land-Use Conversion among Non-Industrial Private Forest Landowners in Florida By Pancholy, Nishita; Thomas, Michael H.; Solís, Daniel; Stratis, Nicholas
  63. Moderate versus Big Cows: Do Big Cows Carry Their Weight on the Ranch? By Doye, Damona; Lalman, David L.
  64. Searching for the Golden Grail: An Optimal Soybean Marketing Frequency Strategy By Stark, C. Robert Jr.; Bryant, Kelly J.; Francis, Paul B.
  65. An Economic Performance Analysis of the Beef Cow-herd Enterprise Using a Stochastic Frontier Function By Cho, Jaesung; Park, Seong Cheol; Bevers, Stanley J.
  66. Measuring the Relative Profitability of Mid-South Cotton Production from an Alternative Gin Seed Rebate Model By Fannin, J. Matthew; Paxton, Kenneth W.
  67. Utilizing cow-calf producer information to increase profits in retained ownership of beef cattle By Williams, Brian R.; Stockton, Matthew C.
  68. Analysis of Texas Winery Visitor Spending and GOTEXAN Efforts to Promote Winery Tourism By Hanagriff, Roger; Murova, Olga I.
  69. Financial Development and International Agricultural Trade: Is There A Connection? By Susanto, Dwi; Rosson, C. Parr
  70. Price Signals as Indicators of Profitability at Various Stages of Production in Oklahoma Beef By Williams, Brian R.; Devuyst, Eric A.
  71. Determining Key Factors of Influence on the Profitability of Retaining Cull Cows Beyond Culling By Amadou, Zakou; Raper, Kellie Curry; Ward, Clement E.; Biermacher, Jon; Cook, Billy
  72. The Law of the Minimum and Sources of Nonzero Skewness for Crop Yield Distributions By Tumusiime, Emmanuel; Brorsen, B. Wade; Boyer, Christopher N.
  73. Integrated On-Farm Decision Making: Economic Implications of Increased Variation in Litter Size By Widmar, David A.; Olynk, Nicole J.; Richert, Brian T.; Schinckel, Allan P.; Foster, Kenneth A.
  74. Homogeneity of Farm Labor: A Dual Approach By D'Antoni, Jeremy; Mishra, Ashok K.; Gillespie, Jeffrey N.
  75. Economic Analysis of Cellulosic Feedstock for Bioenergy in the Texas Rio Grande Valley By Conrad, Ann; McLaughlin, Will; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Falconer, Larry L.; Blumenthal, Juerg M.; Rooney, William L.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; McCorkle, Dean A.
  76. Promoting a local brand: Assessing the Economic Benefits of the Texas Superstar® and Earth-Kind® Promotion on Place (POP) Program By Collart, Alba J.; Palma, Marco A.; Carpio, Carlos E.
  77. Modeling Pine as a Carbon Sequestering Crop in Arkansas By Smith, S. Aaron; Popp, Michael P.; Nalley, Lawton Lanier
  78. The Beneficial Impact of Sorting Heavy Cattle at Re-Implant By Link, David J.; Almas, Lal K.; Brown, Michael S.; Lawrence, Ty E
  79. Producer Willingness to Supply Biomass: the Effects of Price and Producer Characteristics By Altman, Ira; Bergtold, Jason; Sanders, Dwight; Johnson, Thomas G.
  80. Some Evidence of Information Aggregation in Auction Prices By Chezum, Brian; Stowe, C. Jill
  81. The Relevance of Information Sources on Adoption of Precision Farming Technologies by Cotton Producers By Garcia-Jimenez, Carlos I.; Mishra, Ashok K.; Paxton, Kenneth W.; Lambert, Dayton M.; Velandia, Margarita; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Segarra, Eduardo
  82. Economically Efficient Cow Size Selection Using the Product/Product Model By Bryant, Kelly J.; Montgomery, Thomas G.; Whitworth, Whitney A.; Stark, C. Robert
  83. Market Coordination in the Beef Stocker Sector: Short and Long Run Implications of Higher Corn Prices By Peel, Derrell S.
  84. Manure Application Rules and Environmental Considerations By Massey, Raymond E.; Gedikoglu, Haluk
  85. Multi-year Water Allocation: A Policy Analysis for Groundwater Management and Conservation for Irrigated Agriculture By Tewari, Rachna; Almas, Lal K.; Lust, David G.
  86. Contract Grazing on Winter Annuals: Risks and Returns for Cattle Owners By Anand, Manik; Duffy, Patricia A.; Bergtold, Jason S.; Bransby, David; Shoemaker, Carla
  87. Poverty alleviation programs, FDI-led growth and child labour under agricultural dualism By Dwibedi, Jayanta; Chaudhuri, Sarbajit
  88. Methods for Estimating Economic Damages from Environmental Contamination By Shideler, Dave; Dicks, Michael R.
  89. Evaluating the Feasibility of Expanding Direct Marketing Opportunities for Small Producers in Alcorn County, Mississippi By Myles, Albert E.; Poindexter, Patrick; Allen, Albert J.
  90. Commodity Price Shocks and Child Outcomes: The 1990 Cocoa Crisis in Côte d'Ivoire By Cogneau, Denis; Jedwab, Rémi
  91. The poverty impacts of climate change : a review of the evidence By Skoufias, Emmanuel; Rabassa, Mariano; Olivieri, Sergio
  92. Demographic and Economic Profiling of U.S. Demand for Probiotics: The Case of Drinkable Yogurt By Dharmasena, Senarath; Capps, Oral Jr.
  93. Can Economic Crises Be Good for Your Diet? By Dimova, Ralitza; Gang, Ira N.; Gbakou, Monnet Benoit Patrick; Hoffman, Daniel
  94. The Economic and Financial Implications of Supplying a Bioenergy Conversion Facility with Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks By McLaughlin, Will; Conrad, Ann; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Falconer, Larry L.; Blumenthal, Juerg M.; Rooney, William L.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; McCorkle, Dean A.
  95. Is Chocolate Milk the New-Age Energy\Sports Drink in the United States? By Dharmasena, Senarath; Capps, Oral Jr.
  96. Cost-Efficient Valuation of Aesthetic Amenities By Purvis, Jack; Kramer, Elizabeth; Dorfman, Jeffery H.
  97. Competiveness of Latin American Exports in the U.S. Banana Market By Muhammad, Andrew; Fonsah, Greg E.; Zahniser, Steven
  98. Retail Competition in the Milk Market in a U.S. Midwestern City By Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Gould, Brian W.
  99. The Affect of Animal Gender on Fed Cattle Producer Marketing Behavior By Fausti, Scott W.; Qasmi, Bashir A.; Diersen, Matthew A.; Li, Jing; Lange, Brent
  100. United States chicken and grain exports to Mexico: competing for the same market? By Duch-Carvallo, Teresa; Malaga, Jaime E.
  101. Dairy value chain management in Bulgaria By Bachev, Hrabrin
  102. An Optimal Control Framework to Address the Relationship between Water Resource Management and Water-Borne Health Impacts: Focus on the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley By Leidner, Andrew J.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.
  103. Decision Making under Ecological Regime Shift: An Experimental Economic Approach By Kawata, Yukichika
  104. Socio-economic and Demographic factors affecting the likelihood of being an overweight Korean woman By Nambiar, P.M.; Florkowski, W.J.; Suh, Dong-Kyun
  105. Measurement of consumers? wine?related knowledge By Georges Giraud; Cléo Tebby; Corinne Amblard
  106. Demand Estimation for US Apple Juice Imports: A Restricted Source Differentiated AIDS Model By Mekonnen, Dawit Kelemework; Fonsah, Esendugue Greg

  1. By: Chiputwa, Brian; Langyintuo, Augustine S.; Wall, Patrick
    Abstract: Conventional agricultural practices such as the use of the moldboard plough are no longer sustainable due to their extensive soil degradation effects. As a panacea, several Conservation Agriculture (CA) technologies have been promoted to improve soil structure and water conservation. However, adoption of these technologies has been resisted by smallholder farmers and identifying causes of the low adoption rates to facilitate intervention strategies remains a challenge to development practitioners. Using data from 100 farmers, this paper uses a Tobit application to assess the underlying factors important in determining farmersâ adoption of zero-tillage, crop rotation and contour ridging technologies. Empirical results suggest that adoption and use intensity of each of these technologies is affected by a set of distinct household factors. There is also evidence to show complementarities in adoption and use of these technologies, suggesting the need to tailor awareness and promotional strategies depending on the technology in question and socio-economic background of target farmers.
    Keywords: Conservation Agriculture (CA), Conventional Farming (CF) technology, Tobit Model, Adoption, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Farm Management,
    Date: 2010–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98851&r=agr
  2. By: Sobowale, Folakemi; Dicks, Mike; Campiche, Jody
    Abstract: The purpose of this research was to determine whether indirect land use occurs and if so to what extent. Indirect land use is a change from non-cropland to cropland (e.g. deforestation) that may occur in response to increasing scarcity of cropland. As farmers worldwide respond to higher crop prices in order to maintain the global food supply and demand balance, pristine lands are cleared and converted to new cropland to replace the crops for feed and food that were diverted elsewhere to biofuels production. We examine the impact of corn-based ethanol production in the United States on land use in other countries.
    Keywords: ethanol, energy, biofuel, pristine lands., Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98854&r=agr
  3. By: Chintawar, Sachin; Gabrielyan, Gnel; Westra, John
    Abstract: Multiple studies have estimated factors influencing cover crop adoption which include control weed population (Ngouajio et al. 2002), increased soil health (Santhi Wicks and Richard Howitt, 2005), and increased productivity (Johannes M. S. Scholberg, Santiago Dogliotti, Lincoln Zotarelli, Corey M. Cherr, Carolina Leoni and Walter A. H. Rossing, 2010, Jason Bergtold, Jason Fewella, and Patricia Duffy, 2010). An externality of adoption of cover crops that has not been explored is its potential impact on the amount of nitrogen use by farmers. Using a 2009 survey of conventional and organic corn farmers in 7 states of the US, we estimate the factors affecting adoption of cover crops and its impact on nitrogen use. While nitrogen used by farmers is considered as left censored variable, adoption of cover crop is considered as an endogenous dummy variable. The resulting system is a two stage Limited Dependent Variable (LDV) model defined by the amount of nitrogen used by farmers, with endogenous dummy variable that investigates whether the farmer adopts cover crops. We conclude that farmers adopting cover crop technologies, that increase production efficiency, tend to decrease nitrogen fertilizer use. Further, this decrease is significantly higher among organic corn producers compared to conventional corn farmers.
    Keywords: Cover Crop Adoption, Nitrogen Management, Limited Dependent Endogenous Variable Model, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98825&r=agr
  4. By: Knapek, George M.; Richardson, James W.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Raulston, J. Marc
    Keywords: Farm Programs, Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98841&r=agr
  5. By: Uematsu, Hiroki; Mishra, Ashok K.
    Abstract: This study compares farm operatorsâ risk perceptions and actual realization of risk attitudes revealed through off-farm labor, enterprise diversification, and use of contracts, crop insurance, and other types of insurance, using data from 2001 Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS). Results from ordered logit model and multivariate probit models unexpectedly found that risk loving farmers are more likely to employ risk management strategies.
    Keywords: Risk, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Labor and Human Capital, Marketing, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty, D81, Q10, Q12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98839&r=agr
  6. By: Pandit, Mahesh; Mishra, Ashok K.; Paudel, Krishna P.; Larkin, Sherry L.; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.; Larson, James A.; Velandia, Margarita M.; Roberts, Roland K.; Kotsiri, Sofia
    Abstract: We used survey data collected from cotton farmers in 12 southern U.S. states to identify factors influencing cotton farmersâ decisions to adopt precision farming. Using a seemingly unrelated ordered probit model, we found that younger, educated and computer literate farmers chose precision farming for profit reason. Farmers who perceived precision farming to be profitable adopt it to be at the forefront of agricultural technology. We also found that farmers who were concerned with environment emphasize precision farming adoption as a reason to improve environmental quality. Our results also indicate that farmers in coastal states such as Alabama, Mississippi, and North Carolina chose environmental benefits as a reason for precision farming technology adoption.
    Keywords: precision technologies, seemingly unrelated ordered probit, cotton, Agricultural Finance, Farm Management, Q16, C35,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98575&r=agr
  7. By: Chalise, Lekhnath; Coble, Keith H.; Barnett, Barry J.
    Abstract: The customizable area whole farm insurance (CAWFI) was designed and compared with no insurance program and currently available whole farm insurance based on farm level yield (CFWFI). The CAWFI yields higher certainty equivalents over no insurance program, but lower to CFWFI; CAWFI has fairly small indemnity compared with CFWFI.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98900&r=agr
  8. By: Zering, Kelly; van der Hoeven, Guido; Kotsiri, Sofia
    Keywords: farm sale prices, constrained supply, premiums, appraised value, determinants of premium, Agricultural Finance, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011–02–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98857&r=agr
  9. By: Uematsu, Hiroki; Mishra, Ashok K.; Roberts, Roland K.; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.
    Abstract: We estimate a bivariate probit model with sample selection to identify factors affecting adoption and abandonment of precision farming technologies for cotton farmers, using the 2009 Southern Cotton Precision Farming Survey conducted in 12 Southern states in the United States. Farmers for whom being at the forefront of agricultural technology is not an important reason for adoption are more likely to abandon precision farming technologies. This study identified various factors associated with adoption and retention of precision farming technologies. Findings from this study offer significant information to policyâmakers for a better formulation of agriâenvironmental programs that encourage farmers to adopt environmentally benign farming practices including precision farming technologies.
    Keywords: Technology Abandonment, Technology Adoption, Bivariate Probit with Sample Selection, Multinomial Logit, Precision Farming, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Q10, Q12, Q16,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98838&r=agr
  10. By: Whorton, Carly S.; Amanor-Boadu, Vincent
    Keywords: consumer preferences, sustainability, organic, local, willingness to value, Agribusiness, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:99738&r=agr
  11. By: Wixson, Sarah E.; Katchova, Ani L.; Woods, Timothy A.; Hu, Wuyang
    Abstract: The demand for locally produced foods has been increasing. Concurrently, specialty food stores focusing on specific food attributes have also grown in popularity along with farmersâ markets. This study examines how the importance that consumers place on whether specific foods are locally produced affects the likelihood to shop at specialty food stores and farmersâ markets. The major findings indicate that consumers who value locally produced fruits and vegetables are more likely to shop at these markets. Therefore, these markets are well positioned within local food networks to take advantage of the increasing demand for local foods, particularly for fresh products.
    Keywords: Food Stores, Farmers Markets, Local Foods, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Q13,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:97969&r=agr
  12. By: Katchova, Ani L.; Woods, Timothy A.
    Abstract: This study examines the role that food consumer cooperatives play in the local food networks. Data are collected from three case studies with leading food cooperatives and a national survey of the general managers of food cooperatives. We identify the emerging business practices in local sourcing as a differentiation and member recruitment strategy for food cooperatives. Our analysis identifies several clusters of strategies used for local food procurement, based on the extent to which the co-op is involved in procurement activities upstream (at the farm), mid-stream (at the distribution center) or downstream (at the food cooperative). The results also show that when compared to other grocers, food co-ops have clear advantages in working with local producers and oftentimes play a key role in the producersâ business viability.
    Keywords: food consumer cooperatives, local foods, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Q13,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98853&r=agr
  13. By: Raulston, J. Marc; Richardson, James W.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Knapek, George M.
    Abstract: This study evaluates the farm level economic impacts of implementing a whole farm revenue insurance program in lieu of current government program payments on agricultural producers in major production areas of the United States. Realizing a multitude of viable options exist, this study demonstrates one way a whole farm revenue coverage program could work at the farm level and makes comparisons between the current baseline situation and alternative levels of revenue coverage implementation.
    Keywords: agricultural policy, simulation, representative farms, government payments, crop insurance, revenue coverage, Agricultural and Food Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98785&r=agr
  14. By: Herbst, Brian K.; Anderson, David P.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Richardson, James W.
    Abstract: With the 2009 milk prices still fresh on everyoneâs mind, there has been increased interest in ways to limit milk price volatility. Using SERF, this paper determined some dairies are willing to pay for limited milk price volatility and found a value they are willing to pay using risk premiums.
    Keywords: Dairy, Stochastic Simulation, price volatility, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98833&r=agr
  15. By: Ortega, David L.; Wang, H. Holly; Wu, Laping; Bai, Junfei; Olynk, Nicole J.
    Abstract: Food safety issues often arise from problems of asymmetric information between consumers and suppliers of food with regards to product-specific attributes or characteristics. Food safety concerns in China are having a drastic impact on consumer behavior, commodity markets, international trade and food security. An additional challenge to the problem of asymmetric information lies in the inherent structure of the governing bodies which oversee food safety and quality. Unlike the United States and other developed countries, Chinaâs food safety is regulated by several government entities with different and sometimes overlapping responsibilities. As a result consumers donât have a comprehensive food safety and quality system on which to base their economic decisions. In an effort to maintain the food supply of the worldâs largest economy safe, Chinaâs government has approved a series of tougher food safety laws and regulations. Although publicized as a tough approach to food safety, it is unclear whether this latest effort will make Chinaâs food safer to eat and improve the countryâs image to its agricultural trading partners. While much attention has focused on the problems plaguing Chinaâs food inspection system, little research has been dedicated to analyze consumersâ concerns over food safety. In this paper we measure consumer preferences for select food safety attributes in milk. More specifically we estimate consumerâs willingness to pay for government certification, an independent (third party) certification program, national brand, and a productâs shelf-life using a choice experiment approach. We compare and contrast several modeling strategies to capture heterogeneity of consumer preferences. The data used in this study was collected from a choice experiment administered in seven major metropolitan cities in China, yielding a statistical sample of 6,720 observations. Our results suggest that Chinese consumers have the highest willingness-to-pay for a government certification program, followed by national brand, private certification, and longer shelf-life products. We find that Chinese consumers are very concerned about the safety of the milk they purchase and are willing to pay a high premium to assure that their food is safe. The high level of concern regarding milk safety is linked to recent food safety incidents involving dairy products, most notably the Melamine-adulterated milk products. Heterogeneity of consumer preferences and willingness to pay for the select food safety attributes was found by implementing a latent class logit model based on attitudinal responses as well as a mixed logit model. Although it might appear that Chinese consumersâ confidence on the government is eroding, as reported in the wake of recent food safety scandals, our research found that consumers were less confident on non-government food safety control measures. This result indicates that there is a strong need for the Chinese government to provide adequate food safety and quality control. Our findings call upon the direct involvement of the Chinese government in the food safety system. A more strict monitoring system via certification is necessary. If realized, such government efforts will provide higher welfare to consumers in the short-run and will restore consumersâ trust increasing social welfare in the long run. Policy implications of our results are discussed with particular attention given to food safety and security issues.
    Keywords: China, Choice experiment, Mixed logit, Latent class logit, Food safety, Preference heterogeneity, Willingness-to-pay, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Relations/Trade, Marketing, Q11, Q18,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98723&r=agr
  16. By: Nsafoah, Annie; Dicks, Michael R.; Osei, Collins
    Abstract: Over 265 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa face malnutrition, chronic hunger, and poverty. One of the technologies that could help alleviate the perpetuating cycle of chronic hunger is biotechnology. Genetic modification (GM) has the potential to enhance agricultural productivity and improve Africaâs food security, but little is known about the potential benefits and costs of using genetically modified maize in Africa - Ghana. African and Ghanaian policy makers, farmers, and consumers often have difficulty accepting new technologies. Their reluctance is due to the investment required for new technology, - aversion to risk, the changes required to traditional production practices, and incomplete- knowledge of new technologies. This study elicits the knowledge, views, acceptability, preference, adaptability, and willingness-to-pay for genetically modified GM corn (maize). A survey instrument was used in two corn growing areas in the Ashanti Region of Ghana, to identify the barriers to the adoption of GM corn. The results of the study suggest that maize growers in the Ashanti region are willing to try GM maize, contrary to the current government restrictions.
    Keywords: Producers and Consumer attitudes toward Biotechnology in Ghana, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98642&r=agr
  17. By: Miljkovic, Dragan; Shaik, Saleem; Braun, Dane
    Abstract: This study was conducted to analyze the direct and indirect effects of ethanol policy on livestock production. Results of the theoretical model indicate the possibility of ethanol policy indirectly affecting livestock production. Econometric results show a possibility of ethanol policy indirectly impacting cattle production through the RFSâs influence on corn quantity. Policy makersâ intentions with ethanol policy likely were to increase ethanol consumption rather than to directly affect cattle production. However, results of the reduced form equation indicate that the RFS increased the cattle quantity, which represents a direct outcome of ethanol policy on cattle production. Policy makers can utilize the information provided in this study to understand the effects of ethanol policy on multiple agricultural markets. Understanding the existence of indirect and direct effects of newly designed policies on non-targeted markets adds credibility to the policy making process.
    Keywords: Livestock Production, Ethanol Policies, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics, Q17,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98783&r=agr
  18. By: Jones, Jason; Carlberg, Jared; Pendell, Dustin L.
    Abstract: The research reported in this paper created an epidemiological foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) spread model for Ontario. Disease simulations were constructed to reflect three levels of the cattle identification and movement recording system. Outputs generated by the epidemiological model are used to calculate the direct disease control costs of a FMD outbreak. Welfare effects caused by a FMD outbreak are also calculated for each level of cattle traceability using an equilibrium displacement model. Parameter sensitivity was tested for both the epidemiological and economic model results. It is found that the benefits to the beef cattle industry of increasing the ability to trace direct animal contacts during a FMD disease outbreak in Ontario are less than the lowest annual cost estimate of a cattle traceability system as estimated by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
    Keywords: NAADSM, disease spread model, equilibrium displacement model, traceability, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98781&r=agr
  19. By: Stegelin, Forrest; Houston, Jack E.; Compte, Javier Mantilla; Thomas, Paul; Chappell, Matthew
    Abstract: The costs of transporting agricultural products to market and of the acquisition of production inputs are of concern to environmental and food horticulture crops producers. This study is to determine if transportation alliances would reduce shipping costs, increase distribution efficiencies and reduce carbon dioxide emissions among floriculture, ornamental plants, and fruit and vegetable producers in Georgia. Using data from surveys and the ArcLogistics 9.3 GIS software, routing systems were developed to show cost savings opportunities. The results indicated nearly ten percent reductions in average total cost savings to producers, average total miles driven savings, average number of trucks savings, average hours driving savings, and average carbon dioxide (carbon footprint) savings.
    Keywords: transportation alliance, buying local, economic savings, food and environmental horticulture, Agribusiness, Marketing, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98766&r=agr
  20. By: Bulut, Harun; Collins, Keith; Zacharias, Thomas P.
    Abstract: We theoretically examine a farmerâs coverage demand with area and individual insurance plans as either separate or integrated options. The individual and area losses are assumed to be imperfectly and positively correlated. With actuarially fair rates, the farmer will fully insure with the individual plan and demand no area insurance regardless of the plans being separate or integrated. Under separate plans, free area insurance and the fair rate for individual insurance, area insurance replaces a portion of individual insurance demand. Under integrated plans, free area insurance, and the fair rate for individual insurance, the farmer over-insures using both area and individual plans.
    Keywords: Agricultural risk, area plans of insurance, crop insurance, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, Farm Management, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Risk and Uncertainty, D81, G22, Q12, Q18,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98803&r=agr
  21. By: Ellison, Brenna; Lusk, Jayson L.; Briggeman, Brian
    Abstract: Current debates on food and farm policy would benefit from an improved understanding of the publicâs demand for the services provided by the USDA. We determine taxpayerâs preferences for six categories of USDA expenditures using data from a nationwide survey of almost 1,200 taxpayers. We find that taxpayers believe food safety and inspection is the most important service provided by the USDA. Although there is significant heterogeneity in peopleâs preferences, our results reveal that at current expenditure levels, most consumers are willing to give up some of the outcomes and benefits provided by expenditures on farm support programs to obtain more of the benefits and services provided by expenditures on food safety and inspection, natural resources and environment, research and education, and rural development. However, the opposite is true of food assistance programs; most taxpayers would support a reallocation of USDA expenditures away from food assistance toward farm support programs.
    Keywords: taxpayer preferences, USDA budget expenditures, farm policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Q18,
    Date: 2011–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98597&r=agr
  22. By: Sewando,, Ponsian T.; Mdoe, N. Y. S.; Mutabazi, K.D.S
    Abstract: Abstract: The study was conducted to determine farmers’ preferential choice decision of alternative cassava value chain strands and as well as factors behind such decisions in Morogoro rural District, Tanzania. Factor analysis was first used to reduce and identify the factors (variables for further analysis whereby the factors with highest eigen-value were applied to develop factor scores to measure the attitudinal variables. Results indicate that farmers have positive risk attitude towards participation in the alternative cassava value chain strands for commercialization. A count data model known as Poisson model was applied to determine the factors which influenced this attitude. Results indicated that farm size, experience, female-headed households and land-holding had influenced the farmers’ preferential choice decision. Recommendations for enhancing farmers’ participation in profitable cassava value chain strands are strengthening coordination, provision of improved cassava varieties and introduction of cassava processing technologies.
    Keywords: Preferential choice decisions; factor analysis; cassava farmers; risk attitude; Poisson model
    JEL: D8
    Date: 2011–03–23
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:29797&r=agr
  23. By: Latane, Annah; Stephenson, Kurt
    Abstract: This paper compares agricultural nonpoint source crediting procedures between the Pennsylvania and Virginia nutrient trading programs. Differences in farm-level credit production across states will be evaluated for agricultural operations, holding nutrient reduction technologies constant. The implications for the agricultural sector and water quality are discussed.
    Keywords: nutrient trading, credits, agriculture, nonpoint, Environmental Economics and Policy, Q53, Q58,
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98823&r=agr
  24. By: Kotsiri, Sofia; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Marra, Michele C.; Velandia, Margarita
    Abstract: This paper examines how cotton farmers' perceptions about their spatial yield variability influence their decision to adopt precision farming technologies. Utilizing cross-section survey data from 12 Southeastern states and a two-step econometric modeling approach, we find that farmers who perceive their yields as more spatially heterogeneous will more likely use site specific information gathering technologies and apply their inputs at a variable rate. In addition, our empirical analysis shows that perceptions about future profitability and importance of precision farming, along with socio-economic factors, also drive the technology adoption decision. These results have implications for producers contemplating the variable rate management decisions, as well as dealers selling these precision farming technologies.
    Keywords: Multinomial logit, endogeneity, variable rate input applications, site specific information gathering technology, yield perceptions, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Q12, Q16,
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98689&r=agr
  25. By: Acheampong, Kwame; Dicks, Michael R.; Adam, Brian D.
    Abstract: The Renewable Fuel Standard mandate in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires 16 billion gallons out of 36 billion gallons of ethanol be produced from cellulosic feedstocks in 2022, but the mandate was apparently enacted without critical assessments of the agricultural impacts of attempting to achieve energy independence. The feedstock production will likely compete with lands currently used for producing other traditional crops of which hay is likely to be affected the most since it has comparatively lower net returns. Thus ruminant production will consequently be affected greatly. This study uses ordinary least squares (OLS) to estimate and predict Oklahoma hay price which is used as objective value in linear programming (LP) model that determines the profitability options between hay and switchgrass production. The OLS results show that Oklahoma hay price is fairly stable, and hay is shipped across adjoining states. The LP results show that switchgrass production would be more profitable than hay and that switchgrass for biofuel production likely will bid land away from hay if biofuel production becomes fully operational.
    Keywords: biofuel mandates, switchgrass production, hay production, hay markets., Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98797&r=agr
  26. By: Qualls, D. Joshua; Jensen, Kimberly L.; English, Burton C.; Larson, James A.; Clark, Christopher D.
    Abstract: In the United States, biomass is the largest source of renewable energy accounting for over 3 percent of the energy consumed domestically and is currently the only source for liquid, renewable, transportation fuels. Continued development of biomass as a renewable energy source is being driven in large part by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which mandates that by 2022 at least 36 billion gallons of fuel ethanol be produced, with at least 16 billion gallons being derived from cellulose, hemi-cellulose, or lignin. However, the market for cellulosic biofuels is still under development. As such, little is known about producer response to feedstock prices paid for dedicated energy crops. While there have been some studies done on factors that determine farmersâ willingness to produce switchgrass, these have been very regional in nature. This study will provide information regarding potential switchgrass adoption by agricultural producers in twelve southeastern states. The objectives of this research are 1) to determine the likelihood of farmers growing switchgrass as a biomass feedstock and the acres they would be willing to devote to switchgrass production and 2) to evaluate some of the factors that are likely to influence these decisions, including the price of switchgrass. â
    Keywords: Switchgrass, Farmer Adoption, Crop Production/Industries, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q12, Q16,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98625&r=agr
  27. By: Bizimana, Jean Claude; Bessler, David A.; Angerer, Jay P.
    Abstract: Replaced with revised version of paper 02/22/11.
    Keywords: cointegration, structural breaks, market integration, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, International Development, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98856&r=agr
  28. By: Wright, Andrew P.; Hudson, Darren
    Abstract: Agricultural production in the High Plains region of Texas is a part of the foundation of the regionâs economy. Part of the reason for this is the availability of groundwater for irrigation. Currently, the region relies on the Ogallala Aquifer for irrigation water; however, the High Plains is also home to a second aquifer, the Dockum Aquifer, which could be a viable resource for agricultural use. While the Dockum could partially replace the Ogallala, but differences in depth and pumping cost mean that it is not a perfect subsitute. The purpose of this paper is to determine how the use of water resources and crop production in the area would change if a new water resource was introduced. For each of the forty-one counties in the study area, a representative farm was established that reflects the attributes of the county including land, hydrologic, and crop specific characteristics. To estimate the optimal use of groundwater in the region and identify how the inclusion of the Dockum Aquifer affects regional production and groundwater use, a non-linear programing model was created with the objective to maximize net revenues for each county. Using the model to establish a baseline in which only Ogallala water is used, the effect of the using the Dockum Aquifer was estimated by restricting the amount of water available in the Ogallala, while making the Dockum available for use.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98802&r=agr
  29. By: K, Sudarkodi; K, Sathyabama
    Abstract: The unimpeded growth of greenhouse gas emissions is raising the earth’s temperature. The consequences include melting glaciers, more precipitation, more and more extreme weather events, and shifting seasons. The accelerating pace of climate change, combined with global population and income growth, threatens food security everywhere. Agriculture is extremely vulnerable to climate change. Higher temperatures eventually reduce yields of desirable crops while encouraging weed and pest proliferation. Changes in precipitation patterns increase the likelihood of short-run crop failures and long-run production declines. Although there will be gains in some crops in some regions of the world, the overall impacts of climate change on agriculture are expected to be negative, threatening global food security. This paper provides an insight into the different climate change-related challenges that the agricultural sector will face and explores opportunities for emission reductions and adaptation. Agriculture has not figured very prominently in the climate discussion so far. This paper clearly indicates that the sector deserves more attention when it comes to both climate change threats and opportunities. Understanding interrelations and interactions in the agricultural sector and considering its implications for development cooperation is crucial for adequate development responses.
    Keywords: The Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture
    JEL: Q50 Q5 N50 N5 Q0 Q01 Q54 Q18
    Date: 2011–03–15
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:29784&r=agr
  30. By: Khanal, Aditya R.; Gillespie, Jeffrey M.
    Abstract: Adoption decisions and profitability of advanced breeding technologies are analyzed for U.S. dairy farms. The bivariate probit with selection model is used. Results show that specialized, younger, more educated farmers with longer planning horizons are more likely to adopt the technologies, with positive impacts on profitability and negative influences on cost of production.
    Keywords: breeding technologies, dairy, profitability, bivariate probit, selection, artificial insemination, sexed semen, embryo transfer, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98574&r=agr
  31. By: Watkins, K. Bradley; Hignight, Jeffrey A.; Anders, Merle M.
    Abstract: This study evaluated the impacts of farm size and stochastic return variability on no-till (NT) rice profitability at the whole-farm level. Mixed integer programming was used to determine optimal machinery complements, fuel consumption, and machinery labor requirements for conventional till (CT) and NT rice-soybean farms of 1200, 2400, and 3600 acres in size. Crop yields, market prices, and prices for key production inputs were simulated to construct stochastic whole-farm net returns for each farm size under CT and NT management, and both first and second degree stochastic dominance analysis were used to rank cumulative distribution functions of whole-farm returns according to specified risk preferences. The results indicate NT farms exhibit second degree stochastic dominance over CT farms regardless of farm size, and high input prices have less downward effect on the profitability of NT farms relative to CT farms.
    Keywords: mixed integer programming, no-till, profitability, rice, risk, simulation, stochastic dominance, whole-farm, Farm Management, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98733&r=agr
  32. By: Nehring, Richard F.; Sauer, Johannes; Gillespie, Jeffrey; Hallahan, Charles
    Abstract: In recent years, significant structural and production system changes have been noted in the U.S. and European Union, as well as increased interest in pasture-based dairy systems. Technical efficiency, returns to scale, and farm characteristics are compared by size and production system in traditional U.S. dairy states and E.U. countries.
    Keywords: U.S., EU Countries, Dairy Systems, Technical Efficiency, Returns To Scale, Size, Technology, Land Prices, Production Economics, Q12,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98824&r=agr
  33. By: Durand-Morat, Alvaro; Wailes, Eric J.; Chavez, Eddie C.
    Abstract: The hybrid rice technology is one of the many ways in which productivity of scarce resources devoted to rice production could be enhanced, with the consequent alleviation of food insecurity. The findings of this study show that the hybrid rice technology has so far made some sizable contributions to per-capita availability of rice in adopting countries with marginal spillover effects to other regions. However, at forecasted population growths, a massive intensification of adoption would be needed to maintain per-capita availability of rice at baseline levels. But even with adoption rates climbing significantly, much higher equilibrium prices are expected, which will represent a challenge for the hungry in many parts of the world. While hybrid rice has the potential to contribute significantly to improve production and food security, more efforts are needed to improve the productivity of the constraining production resources.
    Keywords: hybrid rice, food security, technology change, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Security and Poverty, International Relations/Trade, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Q16, Q55,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98845&r=agr
  34. By: Yeboah, Anthony K.; Owens, John Paul; Bynum, Jarvetta S.
    Abstract: The overall goal of this research project is to identify and refine factors influencing successful small farm operations in North Carolina. Small farms account for 91 percent of all farms. Given the importance of small farm viability, this research project focuses on identifying ways to further enhance successful small farming in North Carolina. In an effort to further explain the factors that affect successful small-scale farming, researchers have identified factors that have underpinnings in 1) small-farm educational programming; 2) small-scale agricultural enterprises and production practices; 3) alternative marketing; and 4) risk management. Although this research project includes several surveys, for this phase of the project the survey instrument solicited production and financial data, attitudes and beliefs about farming, as well as demographic questions. The research instrument was distributed to a sampling frame that also included small farmers not identified as being successful. Outcomes of this project yielded possible ways to further enhance the success of small farms in North Carolina. Based on case study and questionnaire results, income was not found to be as important as believed and the overall, âlove of farming,â seemed to be the driving force behind the farmerâs view of success and not profit. The small farm may represent an individual business enterprise but in reality represents a family business whose success is often measured in qualifiers indicators rather than business quantifiers.
    Keywords: Small Farm, Agribusiness, Successful, Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98815&r=agr
  35. By: Su, Chia-Hsien; Ishdorj, Ariun; Leatham, David J.
    Keywords: Demand, banana, import, market power, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98847&r=agr
  36. By: Chavez, Eddie C.; Wailes, Eric J.
    Abstract: U.S. rice policy is evaluated in this paper with a global modeling framework to examine the potential impacts of domestic policy reforms using stochastic analysis. The results are preliminary to a more complete analysis and results presented in this paper are limited in scope. Partial results of this study show that while removing government payments for rice and competing crops will make the international rice prices slightly lower, it will contribute to increased price volatility in the global rice market. U.S. rice area harvested, production, and net exports will increase without government payments, while the impacts on rice trade of selected countries are marginal. Results of the deterministic analysis are consistent with those of the stochastic analysis for the selected variables analyzed. The stochastic analysis provides useful insight as it shows how the results are empirically-distributed as opposed to the point estimates provided by the deterministic analysis.
    Keywords: Government payments, stochastic analysis, deterministic analysis, point estimates, empirical distribution, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade, Q11, Q17,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98846&r=agr
  37. By: Adu-Nyako, Kofi; Okafor, Ralph
    Abstract: Despite the nutritional guidelines promoting consumption of fruits and vegetables, the level of fruits and vegetable consumption is drastically below the recommended levels nationally, as well as at the state levels. Among factors that may influence consumption of fruits and vegetables, it is held that factors within the food environment such as the availability of retail types that are conducive for easy access to fruits and vegetables within communities may be presenting barriers to purchase. We employ multilevel modeling approaches to investigate the determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in North Carolina, accounting for food environment factors. Results of the study indicate that availability of supermarkets and full service restaurants is associated positively with fruits and vegetable consumption while fast food outlets are associated negatively. Other smaller store types were not statistically significant. Individual factors including age, being female, employed, income and education all were positively associated with fruits and vegetable consumption. The significant positive association of area level food environmental factors with the consumption of fruits and vegetables indicates a complementary role for intervention directed at improving the availability of supermarket type stores so as to impact healthy food purchases and consumption.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011–02–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98751&r=agr
  38. By: Vedenov, Dmitry; Sanchez, Leonardo
    Abstract: This paper analyzes efficiency of weather derivatives as insurance instruments for rice in Ecuador. Weather derivatives were constructed for each county/season combination. Complicated weather models were estimated for the index, and a copula approach was used to get the probability distributions. We find Risk-reducing efficiency varies across county and season.
    Keywords: agricultural risk management, index insurance, weather derivatives, copula approach, rice production, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Risk and Uncertainty, Q14, Q59,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98747&r=agr
  39. By: Yeboah, Osei; Gunden, Cihat; Allen, Albert; Akuffo, Akua S.
    Abstract: The overall objective of this paper is to measure the impact of the undesirable outputs from NAFTA (agricultural production and trade) on the environment by years in post-NAFTA period. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) was used to measure environmental efficiency by considering desirable (corn production) and undesirable (nitrogen) outputs in fifteen states. DEA allowed us to measure the level of nitrogen pollution to be reduced by modeling undesirable output in efficiency evaluation. Data from 15 states (Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, South Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin) on corn production, land use and nitrogen fertilizer from 1994-2008 (post-NAFTA) were considered. The results indicated environmental inefficiency, nitrogen pollution and land use inefficiency were increasing over the years in the post-NAFTA period.
    Keywords: Data Envelopment Analysis, Environmental Efficiency, Nitrogen Pollution, NAFTA., International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98698&r=agr
  40. By: Kunimitsu, Yoji
    Abstract: The stock management of irrigation and drainage facilities was macro-economically evaluated. The recursive-dynamic CGE model was developed and used for policy simulation. Results demonstrated that effects of activity spread to other industries and total benefit calculated by the consumersâ surplus change was more than the total costs.
    Keywords: Computable General Equilibrium Model, Recursive dynamic model, Consumersâ surplus, Cost-benefit ratio, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Demand and Price Analysis, Production Economics, Public Economics, H30, Q12, Q14, Q18,
    Date: 2011–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98132&r=agr
  41. By: Hughes-Fraire, Randi; Hagerman, Amy D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Gaff, Holly
    Abstract: This research focused on the assessment of the U.S. agricultural sector and human vulnerability to a Rift Valley Fever (RVF) outbreak and the implications of a select set of alternative disease control strategies. Livestock impact assessment is done by using an integrated epidemic/economic model to examine the extent of RVF spread in the Southeast Texas livestock population and its consequences plus the outcome of implementing two different control strategies: emergency vaccination and larvicide vector control separately plus when they are used simultaneously. Human impact assessment utilized an inferential procedure, which comprises of a cost of illness calculation to assess the dollar cost of human illnesses and deaths, as well as a Disability Adjusted Life Year calculation to give an estimate of the burden of disease on public health as a whole. Results indicate substantial potential losses to the U.S., where combined livestock and human national costs ranged from $121 million to $2.3 billion.
    Keywords: Rift Valley Fever, Outbreak, Welfare, Vaccination, Larvicide., Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98629&r=agr
  42. By: Jacoby, Hanan; Rabassa, Mariano; Skouas, Emmanuel
    Abstract: Global warming is expected to heavily impact agriculture, the dominant source of livelihood for the world's poor. Yet, little is known about the distributional implications of climate change at the sub-national level. Using a simple comparative statics framework, this paper analyzes how changes in the prices of land, labor, and food induced by modest temperature increases over the next three decades will affect household-level welfare in India. The authors predict a substantial fall in agricultural productivity, even allowing for farmer adaptation. Yet, this decline will not translate into a sharp drop in consumption for the majority of rural households, who derive their income largely from wage employment. Overall, the welfare costs of climate change fall disproportionately on the poor. This is true in urban as well as in rural areas, but, in the latter sector only after accounting for the effects of rising world cereal prices. Adaptation appears to primarily benefit the non-poor, since they own the lion's share of agricultural land. The results suggest that poverty in India will be roughly 3-4 percentage points higher after thirty years of rising temperatures than it would have been had this warming not occurred.
    Keywords: Climate Change Economics,Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases,Science of Climate Change,Rural Poverty Reduction,Regional Economic Development
    Date: 2011–04–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5623&r=agr
  43. By: Larson, Donald F.; Dinar, Ariel; Frisbie, J. Aapris
    Abstract: Many experts believe that low-cost mitigation opportunities in agriculture are abundant and comparable in scale to those found in the energy sector. They are mostly located in developing countries and have to do with how land is used. By investing in projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), countries can tap these opportunities to meet their own Kyoto Protocol obligations. The CDM has been successful in financing some types of agricultural projects, including projects that capture methane or use agricultural by-products as an energy source. But agricultural land-use projects are scarce under the CDM. This represents a missed opportunity to promote sustainable rural development since land-use projects that sequester carbon in soils can help reverse declining soil fertility, a root cause of stagnant agricultural productivity. This paper reviews the process leading to current CDM implementation rules and describes how the rules, in combination with challenging features of land-use projects, raise transaction costs and lower demand for land-use credits. Procedures by which developed countries assess their own mitigation performance are discussed as a way of redressing current constraints on CDM investments. Nevertheless, even with improvements to the CDM, an under-investment in agricultural land-use projects is likely, since there are hurdles to capturing associated ancillary benefits privately. Alternative approaches outside the CDM are discussed, including those that build on recent decisions taken by governments in Copenhagen and Cancun.
    Keywords: Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases,Environmental Economics&Policies,Energy and Environment,Environment and Energy Efficiency,Banks&Banking Reform
    Date: 2011–04–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5621&r=agr
  44. By: Yeboah, Osei; Gunden, Cihat; Shaik, Saleem; Allen, Albert; Li, Tongzhe
    Abstract: The primary objective of this study is to empirically determine whether North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has contributed to increased agricultural productivity in any of its member countries. Implementation of the NAFTA began on January 1, 1994. This agreement removed most barriers to trade and investment among the United States, Canada, and Mexico, in which all non-tariff barriers to agricultural trade between these countries were eliminated. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and the Malmquist Productivity Index were used to estimate the total factor productivity change, technical change, and efficiency change of agricultural production for each NAFTA country. Then, using time series data, the efficiency changes in countries were compared to determine whether NAFTA has been beneficial to the agricultural sector of a member country. , Total factor productivity, technical change, and efficiency change of agricultural production in NAFTA countries were analyzed for the period 1980-2007, and then a comparison between pre- and post-NAFTA periods was also made. In the analysis, aggregate agricultural production was used as the output, and five variables were considered as the inputs, which included: land, labor, capital, fertilizer and livestock. The results revealed that the average annual total factor productivity increased by 1.6 percent during the 1980-2007 period for NAFTA countries, mainly coming from technical change. Total factor productivity did not change obviously during the pre-NAFTA period. In contrast, it increased by 2.7 percent due to technical improvements in post-NAFTA period. Consequently, it is noticeable that compared to the pre-NAFTA period, the countries especially Mexico performed better by achieving higher levels of productivity in agricultural production.
    Keywords: Agricultural Efficiency, Data Envelopment Analysis, Malmquist Index, NAFTA, Total Factor Productivity, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98726&r=agr
  45. By: Babool, Md. Ashfaqul Islam; Saghaian, Sayed
    Abstract: This study investigates the effects of the current recession on foreign direct investment (FDI) in the food sectors of developing countries. The study tests the hypothesis that the economic recession adversely affects FDI flows in the food sector. The specific objectives are: to identify determinants that influence FDI inflows; to develop an econometric model to estimate changes in FDI inflows as influenced by factor determinants, including the present recession; and to compare the impact of the recession on FDI in the food system in different developed and developing economies.
    Keywords: Recession, FDI, Developing countries, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98786&r=agr
  46. By: Luo, Haobo; Huang, Chung L.; Lin, Biing-Hwan
    Abstract: We revisit the composite food demand system for the United States covering the period from 1953 to 2008. We were unable to produce elasticity measures that are as close or similar to those reported in Huang and Haidacher (1983), although the same demand system specification was employed. Our results based on the more recent data set of 1982-2008 show that most of the own-price elasticities are negative and statistically significant, varying from -.1861 (poultry) to -.9476 (nonfood). In general, the estimated own-price elasticities appear to be smaller in magnitude or more inelastic than previously reported. In contrast, we estimate the significant income elasticities for food vary from .5172 (dairy) to 4.6687 (fish), while Huang and Haidaicher (1983) report their income elasticities to vary from -.6343 (fruits) to .5748 (fats & oils). The estimated income elasticities for nonfood group appear to remain fairly constant among different studies, ranging from 1.0407 to1.2035.
    Keywords: Differential-form demand system, iterative seemingly unrelated regression, Engel aggregation, Homogeneity, Symmetry, Uncompensated and compensated elasticities, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2011–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:99446&r=agr
  47. By: Solis, Daniel; Letson, David
    Abstract: The goal of this study is to empirically evaluate the extent to which agricultural productivity estimates are affected by variation on climate. To do so, we explore the case of the agricultural sector in the Southeast US. This geographical region is influenced seasonally by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomena making it ideal for studying the interaction of climate variability and agricultural productivity. Although, different methodologies have been developed to study TE the stochastic production frontier (SPF) approach offers several advantages over other available alternatives (Kumbhakar and Lovell 2003). Thus, to assess the impact of climatic on TE we estimate alternative SPF models with and without climatic variables. We also test alternative variables to measure the influence of climate on TE; namely, seasonal rain fall and the ENSO phase.
    Keywords: Climate Variability, Productivity, US, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98894&r=agr
  48. By: Springer, Job; Swinford, Wyatt; Rohla, Charles
    Abstract: The objective was to determine if an irrigated improved pecan orchard is economical relative to agronomic systems commonly implemented by producers that have access to irrigation. Results show that the improved pecan orchard is more profitable than competitive enterprises after a twenty year time frame, but is sensitive to pecan price, pecan yield and attitude toward risk.
    Keywords: Profitability, Irrigated, Pecan, Orchard, Southern Plains, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98745&r=agr
  49. By: Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; English, Burton C.; Roberts, Roland K.; de la Torre Ugarte, Daniel G.; West, Tristram O.
    Abstract: This paper evaluated differences between yields of no-tillage compared to conventional or reduced tillage and their associated downside risk. Six crops were evaluated along with how those yields and risks differed by various environmental factors such geographic location, precipitation, soil type and how long the practice had been used.
    Keywords: no-tillage, conservation, conventional tillage, downside-risk, yield, Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98818&r=agr
  50. By: Lee, Byoung-Hoon; Kenkel, Philip L.; Brorsen, B. Wade
    Abstract: Wheat regression models that account for the effect of weather are developed to forecast wheat yield and quality. Spatial lag effects are included. Wheat yield, protein, and test weight level are strongly influenced by weather variables. The forecasting power of the yield and protein models was enhanced by adding the spatial lag effect. Out of sample forecasting tests confirm the modelsâ usefulness in accounting for the variations in average wheat yield and qualities.
    Keywords: prediction, protein, spatial lag, test weight, weather, wheat yield, Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98829&r=agr
  51. By: Donnell, Jeri; Biermacher, Jon T.; Upson, Steve
    Abstract: Abstract Hoop house plasticulture has been promoted as a production technology that allows fruit and vegetable crops to be grown in the cool season months in early spring and late fall. At this time little information regarding the economics of hoop house plasticulture is available. Two fruit and vegetable production systems were developed for growing conditions in south-central Oklahoma. The first system has a spinach crop followed by field tomato, and the second system has annually produced strawberry followed by yellow and zucchini squash. Crop production data were collected in a three-year randomized and replicated experiment. The objectives were (1) to determine the expected cost of production for each crop and systems, (2) to determine the breakeven price for each crop in each system, and (3) to determine how robust breakeven prices are to a number of yield, expense and marketing scenarios. The expected total cost of production were $1,968 and $1,652 per house for spinach and tomato crops, respectively, and $2,749, $359 and $353 per house for yellow and zucchini squash crops, respectively. Breakeven prices for spinach and tomato were $3.32 and $0.83 per pound, respectively, and $6.16, $0.92, and $1.40 per pound for strawberry and yellow and zucchini squash, respectively. Breakeven prices for spinach and strawberry crops were most sensitive to assumptions about quantity of marketable yield sold and/or quantity of yield consumed by grower household.
    Keywords: breakeven prices, economics, fruits and vegetables, hoop houses, plasticulture, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Labor and Human Capital, Marketing, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98840&r=agr
  52. By: Falconer, Lawrence L.; Evers, Gerald W.; Ribera, Luis A.
    Abstract: This paper examined the cost and risk of three grazing systems to provide information on economically sustainable systems for cattle producers in the Texas Coastal Bend. Results indicate the medium input (over-seeded clover) grazing system displays first degree stochastic dominance relative to the high input and no input grazing systems.
    Keywords: grazing system economics, forage production economics, Crop Production/Industries, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98740&r=agr
  53. By: Pan, Suwen; Hudson, Darren; Mutuc, Maria
    Abstract: This paper analyzed the effects of the U.S. domestic offset program on the world cotton markets using a partial equilibrium model following the assumption given by Brown et al. (2010). The results in our study are largely similar to those of Baker et al. and Brown et al., confirming that studyâs findings that ACES, and its domestic offset program in particular, would cause increases in the domestic prices of several agricultural commodities. However, the overall effects of this increase in the world price on total world trade is tempered by increased exports from India, Brazil, Uzbekistan, Australia, and Western & Central African countries.
    Keywords: offset program, cotton, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Q170, Q180,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98557&r=agr
  54. By: Adhikari, Shyam; Knight, Thomas O.; Belasco, Eric J.
    Abstract: Actual Production History (APH) yields play a critical role in determining the coverage offered to producers by the Risk Management Agencyâs (RMA) Yield Protection, Revenue Protection, and Revenue Protection-Harvest Price Exclusion crop insurance products. The RMA currently uses the simple average of from 4 to 10 years of historical yields to determine the APH yield guarantee. If crop yields are trending upward, use of a simple average of historical yields introduces bias into the insurance offering. Using both county and individual insured unit data, we examine the producer impact of APH yield trends for Texas cotton and Illinois corn. Our findings indicate that biases due to using simple average APH yields when yields are trending upward reduce the expected indemnity and actuarially fair premium rate. Certainty equivalent differences are computed and used as a measure of the magnitude of welfare effect of trend-based biases in APH yields. The estimated welfare effect also varies significantly with different commonly used detrending approaches. This study demonstrates that producer welfare can be enhanced through proper treatment of yield trends in crop insurance programs.
    Keywords: Actual Production History, Crop Insurance, Yield Trend, Yield Guarantee, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98855&r=agr
  55. By: Holcomb, Rodney B.; Kenkel, Philip L.
    Abstract: The Oklahoma Food Cooperative (OFC) facilitates transactions between producers and consumers of locally-grown food items. Even with more than 3,000 members and roughly $1M in annual sales, the OFC still needs to establish its long-term sustainability. Both customer-members and supplier-members of the OFC were surveyed to determine the factors driving their current and continued participation in the cooperative.
    Keywords: cooperative, local food movement, member communications, business sustainability, strategic planning, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Marketing,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98816&r=agr
  56. By: Mu, Jianhong H.; McCarl, Bruce A.
    Abstract: Replaced with revised version of paper 01/26/11
    Keywords: Climate Change, Stocking Rate, Land Use, Livestock Management, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98708&r=agr
  57. By: Basnet, Arjun; Depona, Theo; Hedges, Wesley; Dicks, Michael R.
    Abstract: This paper describes research to create a national database of switchgrass supply as part of the biomass program launched by the Department of Energy. The paper provides an estimate of county level switchgrass yield data for the state of Oklahoma. The estimates are made for the top five most productive and abundant soils for each county in Oklahoma. A simple approach of ratio calculation and estimation is used to predict the switchgrass yield of one soil type by comparing it with the yield of several other crops in another soil type. The data for switchgrass yield for a particular soil type are obtained from the state research experiment stations. The yields for other crops for the top five soils are obtained from the NASS data sources. Switchgrass supply for Oklahoma was estimated to be 49.5 million tons from the top soils with the Northeast crop reporting district to be the dominant supplier.
    Keywords: Biofuel, Switchgrass, Ratio Estimation, South Central, Oklahoma, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98792&r=agr
  58. By: Reynolds-Allie, Kenesha; Fields, Deacue
    Abstract: Direct marketing to restaurants has become increasingly popular as chefs desire high quality, fresh foods to meet the demand of their customers who are becoming more health conscious. Restaurants accounted for approximately 70 percent of the 2009 total food expenditures, and as a result represent a tremendous potential for developing a sustainable network with local growers. This study seeks to determine restaurant/chefsâ preferences for local food in Alabama using choice based conjoint analysis, as well as, determine challenges faced by restaurants interested in purchasing locally. Availability and lack of knowledge are found to be the major barriers to purchasing locally. Results also suggest there is great potential for direct marketing to restaurants in Alabama that producers are not currently utilizing.
    Keywords: Restaurants, Conjoint, Local, Chefs, Preferences, Marketing, Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98822&r=agr
  59. By: Willis, David B.; Stovall, Jeff; Johnson, Jeffrey W.; Rainwater, Ken; Barbato, Lucia S.; Mulligan, Kevin; Fish, Ernest B.
    Abstract: Estimation of agricultural policy cost for a given level of groundwater conservation requires the establishment of an accurate baseline condition. This is especially critical when the benefits and cost of any conservation program are generally estimated relative to the status quo policy or baseline situation. An inaccurate baseline estimate will lead to poor estimates of potential water conservation savings and agricultural policy cost. Over a 60-year planning horizon per acre net present value is as much as 29.8% higher for a study area when aquifer characteristics are assumed to be homogenous and set to their average area value than when the heterogeneity in aquifer characteristics is explicitly modeled.
    Keywords: Aquifer Modeling, Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98843&r=agr
  60. By: Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Stiegert, Kyle W.
    Abstract: This manuscript studies the market conduct of the milk manufacturers and retail chains in a Midwestern state in the U.S. Following the menu approach we employ a random coefficient logit demand model to investigate several possible scenarios on the supply side. Demand estimates are obtained using both cross-sectional and time series variation in data. We also allow annual variation in consumer demographics which helps identify the coefficients of interaction between consumer demographics and product characteristics. To further enhance identification power we allow choice set of milk to vary across markets. The results are most supportive of the conjecture that manufacturers behave competitively letting the retailers be the residual claimants. Later they may collect a part or full rents from the retailers through two-part tariffs.
    Keywords: Market conduct, random coefficient logit, vertical chain, imperfect competition, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Industrial Organization, D43, L13,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98844&r=agr
  61. By: Gilvan Guedes (Brown University); Mariângela Antigo (Cedeplar-UFMG); Ana Flávia Machado (Cedeplar-UFMG); Eduardo Brondízio (Indiana University); Leah VanWey (Brown University)
    Abstract: This paper analyses the contribution of the biophysical characteristics, accessibility conditions and land use/cover classes on poverty dynamics among rural smallholders in Altamira, State of Pará. Poverty-environment literature points that the increasing institutional restrictions to deforestation, along with lack of titling, may affect the ability of smallholders in the Amazon (and elsewhere) to diversify their agricultural strategies and expand their production. Using a longitudinal representative sample of rural properties/households in the Altamira Study Area (1997 and 2005), we find some evidence that corroborate this scenario. Accessibility to the property during the rainy season and the presence of alfisoils are the two main factors impacting the time spent on poverty, regardless of initial condition of the farmer. Conversely, natural capital and land use indicators are more sensitive to the initial condition, suggesting a higher level of endogeneity between them and the condition of poverty. Results suggest that improvement in property accessibility provided by local or regional government may reduce, instead of exacerbate, the demand for land by allowing farmers to capitalize for more intensive and sustainable land use strategies.
    Keywords: Amazonia, Poverty, Accessibility, Natural Capital, Land Use
    JEL: Q15 R14 R23
    Date: 2010–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cdp:texdis:td415&r=agr
  62. By: Pancholy, Nishita; Thomas, Michael H.; Solís, Daniel; Stratis, Nicholas
    Abstract: A hypothetical market for renting and converting forested land into row cropping for biofuel production revealed that nearly half of the 1,060 non-industrial landowners sampled in Florida are willing to accept payments for land type conversion and the resulting supply function is inelastic and positive. While respondentâs previous involvement with forest management cost-share program increased their probability of accepting payments for forest type conversion, those who indicated forest aesthetics as the primary reason for the land ownership were less likely to participate in this hypothetical market.
    Keywords: NIPF landowners, Probit regression, Land-use conversion, United States, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98526&r=agr
  63. By: Doye, Damona; Lalman, David L.
    Abstract: Efficiency in beef production and economics is impacted by cow maintenance requirements and output. Budget and linear programming analysis are used to evaluate cost and returns for two cow sizes on two different pasture systems. Moderate-sized cows on native pasture generate the greatest pre-tax returns to management and overhead.
    Keywords: cow size, beef production, beef returns, beef cost of production, linear programming, beef systems, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics, Q12,
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98748&r=agr
  64. By: Stark, C. Robert Jr.; Bryant, Kelly J.; Francis, Paul B.
    Abstract: Gross revenue from marketing frequency strategies varies with average soybean prices across time periods. A study examined statistical differences among trading days using a four-year database of cash prices. Results applied to a hypothetical Arkansas soybean farm using four strategies over four years revealed the optimal gross revenue marketing strategy.
    Keywords: Grains, marketing strategies, soybean, cash prices, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Marketing, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98753&r=agr
  65. By: Cho, Jaesung; Park, Seong Cheol; Bevers, Stanley J.
    Abstract: Standardized Performance Analysis (SPA) data from Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico were used to examine the economic performance of beef cow herd operations in the Southern Plains region by measuring their technical efficiency index. Factors that make significant impacts on the production are herd size, machinery investment per breeding cow, and rainfall. Little technical inefficiency among the Southern beef cattle operations that participated in the SPA data was found.
    Keywords: beef, cattle, cost, cow-calf, production, stochastic production function., Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98842&r=agr
  66. By: Fannin, J. Matthew; Paxton, Kenneth W.
    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to assess the opportunity returns forgone to cotton producers in the lower Mid-South region of the United States for growing cotton, compared to alternative commodities. We calculate the actual net returns per acre for selected cotton-producing counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. In addition, we calculate the opportunity returns per acre if the acres planted in cotton were planted in the highest net return commodity per acre between corn and soybeans during the period 1997 through 2008. Our results find that producers in these cotton producing-counties faced sizeable opportunity revenues foregone averaging 43% between 2003 and 2008. Most observers of the cotton industry would argue that these foregone revenues are a function of historical cotton producers not planting a higher proportion of their acreage in the more-profitable corn enterprise in 2007 and 2008. However, opportunity revenues per acre foregone averaged 37% in the 2007-08 period. This finding suggests that cotton producers recognized a few years prior to the corn price spike in 2007 that alternative commodities, such as corn and soybeans, would generate greater returns on their land. Our research suggests that the higher corn price helped push cotton producers over the edge into planting a greater percentage of their acreage in alternative commodities.
    Keywords: cotton ginning, returns above variable costs, cotton, corn, soybeans, Production Economics, Q10,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98794&r=agr
  67. By: Williams, Brian R.; Stockton, Matthew C.
    Abstract: Retained ownership has been found to be a profitable endeavor, yet many cow-calf producers choose not to retain their calves. While this paper does not directly explore the reasons producers might have for not retaining ownership, which may include uncertainty, it does explore innovative use of asymmetrical information that might reduce some of the uncertainty. Results are summarized in a regression analysis similar to a Hedonic price model where birth weight, weaning weight, and weaning age are found to be important factors to consider when selecting animals to retain.
    Keywords: Asymmetrical Information, Hedonic Price Model, Beef, Retained Ownership, Producer Profitability, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics, D82, M31, Q13,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98773&r=agr
  68. By: Hanagriff, Roger; Murova, Olga I.
    Abstract: Swinburne University (Langworthy, Howard, Fiona & Mawson, 2006), agri-tourism is a growing phenomenon in Australia, often most strongly associated with wine regions. Recommendations to improve include creation of tourism regions & cooperatives, cooperation between sectors (CVBs, restaurants), infrastructure development and model development to measurable factors. South African wineries Bruwer, 2003 identified factors that were helpful in developing a wine tourism market of South African wineries. Regarding South Africa wine tourism, areas of winery business that promote tourism include both service provision and destination marketing, development of wine routes forms an integral part of the wine tourism industry, estates sell more wine through the cellar-door and tourism industry needs well-developed infrastructure. To complete this analysis for Texas, an online survey was sent to over 9,000 wine consumers. Preliminary results of this study found that Texas winery travelers spend over $400 per winery visit. Winery tourism outspend typical tourist in Texas with 24% of their spending related to accommodations spending. Wineries involved in promoting tourism visitations have significantly higher sales and winery visitation than those not focusing on tourism as part of the marketing promotions (p<.05). A secondary aspect of this study is to survey Texas wineries and measure their involvement and satisfaction with TDA wine support efforts. The results illustrate that wineries involved in TDA wine promotional programs report higher increases in sales, winery visitations and attribute increases in sales to TDA marketing efforts over those less involved wineries.
    Keywords: Texas Wine, TDA Wine Marketing, State Value of Wine Marketing, Wine Tourism, Rural Tourism, Tourism, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Marketing,
    Date: 2011–02–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98793&r=agr
  69. By: Susanto, Dwi; Rosson, C. Parr
    Abstract: This study empirically investigates the possible link between financial development and international agricultural trade using binomial models of the gravity equations. Financial development is measured by a constructed financial reforms index. The results provide some evidence on the positive impacts of financial reform on agricultural exports. The results further indicate that countries with a greater degree of financial development as exhibited by advanced countries tend to have larger impacts on agricultural exports. Bilateral trade involving advanced countries has a larger magnitude of impacts of financial reforms on agricultural trade than those involving developing countries
    Keywords: agricultural trade, binomial model, financial reform, gravity model, International Development, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98479&r=agr
  70. By: Williams, Brian R.; Devuyst, Eric A.
    Abstract: Cow-calf producers face an annual decision on when to sell their calves. They can sell them at any point between weaning and slaughter, with the objective of finding the profit maximizing selling point. This paper investigates the use of price signals to determine profit maximizing selling points/retention strategies. Three retention strategies, one for fall calving and two for spring calving, are considered. Producers can sell their calves at weaning, after preconditioning, after grass pasture, after wheat pasture, or after the feedlot depending on the retention strategy. These price signals indicate the optimal selling point based on an observable price ratio at weaning. This paper also considers factors such as the level of preconditioning premiums and the length of the preconditioning period required to impact the profit maximizing selling point.
    Keywords: Beef, Producer Profitability, Price Signals, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics, Q13, Q10,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98769&r=agr
  71. By: Amadou, Zakou; Raper, Kellie Curry; Ward, Clement E.; Biermacher, Jon; Cook, Billy
    Abstract: Factors influencing the profitability of retaining and feeding cull cows beyond culling were investigated. First, a price response function is estimated using 19 years of monthly price data as reported by Agricultural Market Services (AMS). Net returns are then estimated using data from a three year cull cow feeding experiment conducted at The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation and used to examine the relative effect of various factors on net returns. Results showed the importance of average daily gain increases across feeding periods while feeding system is also an important contributing factor to net returns.
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing, Q1,
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98790&r=agr
  72. By: Tumusiime, Emmanuel; Brorsen, B. Wade; Boyer, Christopher N.
    Abstract: Crop yields are not commonly found to be normally distributed, but the cause of the non-normal distribution is unclear. The non-normality might be due to weather variables and/or an underlying von Liebig law of the minimum (LoM) production function. Our objective is to determine the degree to which an underlying linear response stochastic plateau production function can explain the skewness of Oklahoma wheat yields at varied nitrogen rates. We use farm-level wheat data from a long-term experiment in Oklahoma, which is a unique data set to the literature. The Tembo et al. (2008) production function provides negative skewness at all levels of nitrogen with skewness near zero for both very high and very low levels of nitrogen. Observed skewness for wheat yields, however, is positive. The variation in the plateau by year shows positive skewness. Skewness in yield potential related to weather should be considered as a possible explanation of skewness.
    Keywords: linear plateau model, non-normal distributions, skewness, wheat, yield distribution, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty, Q10,
    Date: 2011–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98820&r=agr
  73. By: Widmar, David A.; Olynk, Nicole J.; Richert, Brian T.; Schinckel, Allan P.; Foster, Kenneth A.
    Abstract: Increased litter sizes and associated piglet performance consequences, challenge swine producers. Stochastic modeling captured bioeconomic performance of individual piglets. As average litter size increased from 8.8 to 20.8 piglets, costs and revenues per head marketed from the demonstration herd decreased and total profit increased at a decreasing rate.
    Keywords: stochastic modeling, farm business management, swine litter size, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98817&r=agr
  74. By: D'Antoni, Jeremy; Mishra, Ashok K.; Gillespie, Jeffrey N.
    Abstract: The assumption of homogeneity between family and hired farm labor is common in farm labor research. Controlling for region and farm size, this study employs a seemingly unrelated regression analysis to jointly estimate a translog cost function and factor cost shares to determine the elasticity of substitution between hired and family farm labor. The results show an evidence of heterogeneity of farm labor in both cash grain and hog farms in the U.S. There is further evidence that the elasticity of substitution is unitary and the cost minimizing ratio of hired and family labor is not independent of time. Regional factors were found to have little effect on the substitutability of farm labor, whereas farm size was found to have a significant influence on the relationship between hired and family labor.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Labor and Human Capital, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98754&r=agr
  75. By: Conrad, Ann; McLaughlin, Will; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Falconer, Larry L.; Blumenthal, Juerg M.; Rooney, William L.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; McCorkle, Dean A.
    Keywords: Farm Management,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98810&r=agr
  76. By: Collart, Alba J.; Palma, Marco A.; Carpio, Carlos E.
    Abstract: This paper aims to evaluate consumerâs awareness and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for two ornamental brands in Texas: Texas Superstar® and Earth-Kind®, after a Promotion on Place (POP) Program was developed by the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA). Consumerâs characteristics that are more likely to influence brand awareness and WTP are identified.
    Keywords: Brand recognition, Willingness to pay, Consumer preferences, Ornamentals, Consumer/Household Economics, Marketing,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98796&r=agr
  77. By: Smith, S. Aaron; Popp, Michael P.; Nalley, Lawton Lanier
    Keywords: Carbon Sequestration, Loblolly Pine, Carbon Offset, Carbon Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98787&r=agr
  78. By: Link, David J.; Almas, Lal K.; Brown, Michael S.; Lawrence, Ty E
    Abstract: This research examined a simple sorting strategy to reduce the prevalence of heavyweight carcass discounts. Cattle that were identified and sorted off at re-implant had a reduced prevalence of heavyweight carcasses versus unsorted cattle. Re-implant sorting was profitable at pen average in-weights of 800 pounds or less.
    Keywords: cattle, fed cattle marketing, cattle sorting, formula marketing, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing, Q11, Q16, M31,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98732&r=agr
  79. By: Altman, Ira; Bergtold, Jason; Sanders, Dwight; Johnson, Thomas G.
    Abstract: This paper presents research results based on data from two biomass producer surveys collected from mid Missouri and southern Illinois. Specific topics of interest include the effect of price and producer characteristics on willingness to supply, assets producers currently own and services they may be willing to provide if bioenergy industries develop. A series of censored tobit regressions are utilized to analyze willingness to supply results under three price scenarios. Marginal effects of a one dollar change in the biomass price are shown to increase the willingness to supply by 0.5 to 2 percent.
    Keywords: biomass, willingness to supply, Agribusiness,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98804&r=agr
  80. By: Chezum, Brian; Stowe, C. Jill
    Abstract: Paper was previously titled "The Informativeness of Prices as Quality Signals in the Thoroughbred Industry"
    Keywords: Efficient Markets Hypothesis, information aggregation, auctions, Thoroughbred industry, Agribusiness, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2010–11–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98528&r=agr
  81. By: Garcia-Jimenez, Carlos I.; Mishra, Ashok K.; Paxton, Kenneth W.; Lambert, Dayton M.; Velandia, Margarita; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Segarra, Eduardo
    Abstract: Replaced with revised version of paper 02/16/11.
    Keywords: strategic communication, competitiveness, extension, economics of information, technology diffusion, technology supply, communication methods, knowledge management, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession, D22, D80, D82, D83, Q12, Q16,
    Date: 2011–02–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98123&r=agr
  82. By: Bryant, Kelly J.; Montgomery, Thomas G.; Whitworth, Whitney A.; Stark, C. Robert
    Abstract: Economically optimal cow size is examined using a two product production framework with a single allocatable factor. Auction price data is used to construct a Total Revenue Curve for sales of small and large calves. A Production Possibilities Curve is constructed for a farmer with 100 animal units of resources. Results show that smaller calves are the solution regardless of calving season or market location.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Beef Cattle, Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98836&r=agr
  83. By: Peel, Derrell S.
    Abstract: Beef industry sectors are coordinated by a relatively subtle combination of absolute price levels and price relationships across feeder cattle weights. This paper presents a conceptual framework to understand market based coordination of production in the beef industry. The paper illustrates with examples from history and discusses the implications of permanently higher corn prices.
    Keywords: Cattle Markets, Stocker Cattle, Market Coordination, Marketing,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98826&r=agr
  84. By: Massey, Raymond E.; Gedikoglu, Haluk
    Abstract: Three manure application limits (N Limit, Annual P Limit and P Banking) were modeled with particular attention to the number of hours needed to appropriately distribute manure. The benefit and costs estimates indicated that P Banking was more profitable than N Limit which was more profitable than Annual P Limit. The number of hours required indicated that the Annual P Limit would not be completed within a two month window approximately 2 of 10 years. The increased number of hours for the Annual P Limit also increased the probability of a runoff event following manure application, relative to the other two scenarios. This work indicates that regulations that require Annual P Limits of manure cost the farmer and may have the unintended consequence of increasing runoff.
    Keywords: manure, environment, policy, runoff, hours, acres, probability, rainfall, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98765&r=agr
  85. By: Tewari, Rachna; Almas, Lal K.; Lust, David G.
    Abstract: Heavy withdrawals from the most dependable source of groundwater in the Texas Panhandle, the Ogallala Aquifer, create an impending need for implementing water conservation policies. This study evaluates the policy option of multi-year water allocation coupled with water use restriction in four water deficit counties of Castro, Deafsmith, Parmer and Swisher over a sixty year planning horizon. Results indicate that the water use in the study area declines with progressive restriction rates accompanied by a substantial decrease in the net present value of net returns over sixty years and therefore it is important to analyze the socio-economic effects of implementing such a policy alternative.
    Keywords: Multi-year allocation, Ogallala Aquifer, Texas Panhandle, Water conservation, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98737&r=agr
  86. By: Anand, Manik; Duffy, Patricia A.; Bergtold, Jason S.; Bransby, David; Shoemaker, Carla
    Abstract: Critical factors affecting risk and profitability for cattle owners under contract grazing include cattle weight at purchase and time spent on pasture and feedlot. Buying lighter animals and placing them in pastures before sending them to feedlot is the most profitable as well as least risky option. Even in the least risky scenario, the cattle owner would still incur losses 28% of the times. The results also show a possibility that at contract-grazing rates of $0.41 per pound of gain or more, the cattle owner would place cattle directly on the feedlot, bypassing the pasture.
    Keywords: contract grazing, risks, returns, Farm Management, Livestock Production/Industries, Q12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98752&r=agr
  87. By: Dwibedi, Jayanta; Chaudhuri, Sarbajit
    Abstract: The paper is aimed at providing a theoretical explanation why policies that affect only the supply side of the child labour problem may not be able to mitigate the incidence of child labour in a developing economy in terms of a three-sector general equilibrium model with agricultural dualism and child labour. Although a poverty alleviation program like subsidization of backward agriculture exerts a downward pressure on the child labour incidence through the supply side by raising adult wage income it ultimately worsens the problem by increasing the demand for child labour resulting from an expansion of backward agriculture. The paper finds that a policy of overall economic growth in the form of an FDI (foreign direct investment) is indeed able to put downward pressures on the child labour problem both through the demand and supply sides. Welfare of the child labour-supplying families also improves consequently.
    Keywords: Child labour; general equilibrium; agricultural dualism; subsidy policy; poverty alleviation program; capital led growth
    JEL: J13 J10 O17 O12
    Date: 2011–02–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:29997&r=agr
  88. By: Shideler, Dave; Dicks, Michael R.
    Abstract: While significant attention has been given to the decrease in property values associated with environmental contamination (i.e., stigma effects), little attention has been given to the stigma impacts on the local community as a whole. In addition, most estimates of stigma damages have been performed within a community, using distance from contamination or comparing contamination and non contamination areas in the community. In this article we determine stigma damages by analyzing property values in comparable communities and develop the rationale for estimating the community impact associated with environmental contamination that extends beyond the impact on individual property owners. These impacts were estimated for the environmental contamination from zinc smelting in the municipality of Blackwell, Oklahoma. The impacts were measured in terms of lost ad valorem tax revenue using hedonic pricing and average treatment effects.
    Keywords: environmental damages, environmental contamination, Environmental Economics and Policy, Q51,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98808&r=agr
  89. By: Myles, Albert E.; Poindexter, Patrick; Allen, Albert J.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Marketing,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98871&r=agr
  90. By: Cogneau, Denis; Jedwab, Rémi
    Abstract: We look at the drastic cut of the administered cocoa producer price in 1990 Côte d'Ivoire and study to which extent cocoa producers' children suffered from this severe aggregate shock in terms of school enrollment, labor, height stature and morbidity. Using pre-crisis (1985-88) and post- crisis (1993) data, we propose a difference-in-difference strategy to identify the causal effect of the cocoa shock on child outcomes, whereby we compare children of cocoa-producing households and children of other farmers living in the same district or the same village. This causal effect is shown to be rather strong for the four child outcomes we examine. Hence human capital investments are definitely procyclical in this context. We also argue that the difference-in-difference variations can be interpreted as private income effects, likely to derive from tight liquidity constraints.
    Keywords: Education; Health; Child Labor; Commodity price Education; Health; Child Labor; Commodity price
    JEL: I12 I21 O12
    Date: 2010–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cpm:docweb:1018&r=agr
  91. By: Skoufias, Emmanuel; Rabassa, Mariano; Olivieri, Sergio
    Abstract: Climate change is believed to represent a serious challenge to poverty reduction efforts around the globe. This paper conducts an up-to-date review of three main strands of the literature analyzing the poverty impacts of climate change : (i) economy-wide growth models incorporating climate change impacts to work out consistent scenarios for how climate change might affect the path of poverty over the next decades; (ii) studies focusing on the poverty impacts of climate change in the agricultural sector; and (iii) studies exploring how past climate variability impacts poverty. The analysis finds that the majority of the estimates of the poverty impacts tend to ignore the effect of aggregate economic growth on poverty and household welfare. The empirical evidence available to date suggests that climate change will slow the pace of global poverty reduction, but the expected poverty impact will be relatively modest and far from reversing the major decline in poverty that is expected to occur over the next 40 years as a result of continued economic growth. The studies focusing on the sector-specific channels of impacts of climate change suggest that the estimated impacts of climate change on agricultural yields are generally a poor predictor of the poverty impacts of climate change at the national level due to heterogeneity in the ability of households to adapt. It also appears that the impacts of climate change are generally regressive, that is, they fall more heavily on the poor than the rich.
    Keywords: Rural Poverty Reduction,Climate Change Economics,Science of Climate Change,Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases,Regional Economic Development
    Date: 2011–04–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5622&r=agr
  92. By: Dharmasena, Senarath; Capps, Oral Jr.
    Abstract: Data from U.S. households for calendar year 2008 were used in examining demographic and economic factors affecting demand for drinkable yogurts using Heckman two-step procedure. Price, region, race and gender of household head were significant drivers of consumption of drinkable yogurts. Statistically significant sample selection bias was observed.
    Keywords: Probiotics, drinkable yogurts, Nielsen HomeScan data, Heckman two-step, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, D11, D12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98743&r=agr
  93. By: Dimova, Ralitza (University of Manchester); Gang, Ira N. (Rutgers University); Gbakou, Monnet Benoit Patrick (University of Hohenheim); Hoffman, Daniel (Rutgers University)
    Abstract: With fortuitously timed data – collected before, during and after a major macro-financial crisis in Bulgaria – we revisit several hypotheses in the economics and nutritional literature related to the tendency of households to smooth their nutritional status over time. We explore the dietary impact of both falling real incomes in the context of hyperinflation and crisis and changing relative prices and the changing responsiveness of different groups of people to these incomes and prices over six year of fundamental structural reforms of the economy. Our results highlight large and dramatically changing food and nutrient elasticities, which challenge the perception of household ability to smooth their nutrient stream during economic crises and transitions.
    Keywords: crisis, diet, fluctuation, health, nutrition
    JEL: E32 I12 P23 P24 P36
    Date: 2011–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5610&r=agr
  94. By: McLaughlin, Will; Conrad, Ann; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Falconer, Larry L.; Blumenthal, Juerg M.; Rooney, William L.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; McCorkle, Dean A.
    Keywords: Production Economics,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98809&r=agr
  95. By: Dharmasena, Senarath; Capps, Oral Jr.
    Abstract: Data from U.S. households for calendar year 2008 were used in examining demographic and economic factors affecting demand for chocolate milk using Heckman two-step procedure. Price, income, age, education, region, race, Hispanic status, and presence of children were significant drivers of consumption of chocolate milk. Sample selection bias was statistically significant.
    Keywords: Chocolate milk, Nielsen HomeScan data, Heckman two-step, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, D11, D12,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98742&r=agr
  96. By: Purvis, Jack; Kramer, Elizabeth; Dorfman, Jeffery H.
    Abstract: In order to avoid costly data collection practices common in hedonic valuation of aesthetic amenities, easy-to-collect secondary County tax and geospatial data are used to derive estimates for spatial effects on residential land values. Three Georgia Counties were selected due to data availability: Clarke, Henry, and Richmond. All properties meeting panel-design criterion are included in analysis samples. Large datasets prompt the omission of traditional hedonic model variables such as property characteristics. The focus of analysis is directed toward Canopy and Impervious land-cover estimates. Focal means are calculated at different ranges for immediate and neighborhood-wide assessment of surrounding cover. Community variables designed to describe neighborhood composition are included. Class, the measure of average size and Density, the average distance between nearby homes, are calculated at same neighborhood ranges as Focal means. Regressors also include distances to Schools, Hospitals, Airports, and Highways. Pooled Ordinary Least Squares performed with data normalized by log-transformation yields practical, statistically significant results. Consistency of estimates among Counties provides assurance of model viability, while variety is still strong between all Counties. Some concerns of data reliability and appropriateness of goodness-of-fit measure are voiced for any future analysis.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98872&r=agr
  97. By: Muhammad, Andrew; Fonsah, Greg E.; Zahniser, Steven
    Abstract: U.S. banana demand differentiated by country of origin is estimated using the generalized dynamic Rotterdam model. Results indicate that dynamic factors play a significant role in determining the allocation of U.S. banana expenditures across exporting sources. Of particular interest is Guatemalaâs increased share and Costa Ricaâs decreased share of U.S. banana supply. A number of factors explained why Guatemala replaced Costa Rica as the leading U.S. supplier in 2007. (1) Guatemala is the least expensive source on average. (2) Habit persistence, adjustment costs, and other dynamic factors favor Guatemalaâs exports. (3) Given increases in the relative price of Costa Ricaâs bananas, the price competition between Costa Rica and Guatemala is highly significant. (4) Bananas from Costa Rica are highly responsive to own-price while imports from Guatemala are more price-inelastic. (5) Heavy rains and fluctuating temperatures in Costa Rica have decreased banana production and exports.
    Keywords: bananas, imports, demand, Latin America, United States, Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade, F14, Q11, Q13, Q17,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98365&r=agr
  98. By: Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Gould, Brian W.
    Abstract: The main goal of this manuscript is to explore the retailer conduct in the milk market in a U.S. Midwestern city, based upon a structural estimation of consumer milk demand and retailer optimality conditions. To model milk demand we rely upon the Almost Ideal Demand System, while allowing the retailer optimality conditions to cover a range of competitive scenarios from perfect competition to horizontal cartel. We employ a conjectural variation approach in the spirit of Newly Empirical Industrial Organization to study the competitive environment on the retail landscape. We find that the retail market in question is far from being competitive, with the two major retailers being engaged in an oligopolistic competition. Furthermore, the private label milk seems an important tool for some big players to extract rents from their competitors. The current study offers an idea of the competitive atmosphere in the retail sector of food marketing system. While we do not target direct estimates of retailer market power, this might serve an important first step to understand the nature of competition in a given market with only aggregate purchase quantity and price data.
    Keywords: AIDS demand, conjectural variation, market power, oligopolistic competition., Demand and Price Analysis, Industrial Organization, D11, D12, D43, L13,
    Date: 2011–01–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:99281&r=agr
  99. By: Fausti, Scott W.; Qasmi, Bashir A.; Diersen, Matthew A.; Li, Jing; Lange, Brent
    Abstract: Weekly grid market share by volume for slaughter steers is compared to slaughter heifers. Summary statistics indicate average grid market share for steers (42%) is 27% higher than slaughter heifers (33%). The literature indicates that pregnancy and increased dark cutter incidence associated with heifers relative to steers creates additional financial risk when heifers are sold on a grid. Econometric analysis suggests grid market share is less sensitive to change in market conditions for heifers relative to steers. The empirical evidence is consistent with the supposition that marketing heifers is riskier than marketing steers on a grid. Thus sellers need stronger economic incentives to market heifers on a grid relative to steers.
    Keywords: grid pricing, fed cattle, animal gender, risk, Livestock Production/Industries, Q00,
    Date: 2011–02–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98541&r=agr
  100. By: Duch-Carvallo, Teresa; Malaga, Jaime E.
    Abstract: The impacts of maintaining increasing rates of Mexican chicken meat imports from the United States on United States grain sorghum price and Mexican GS imports from the United States were modeled using a non-spatial, partial equilibrium, econometric, and simulation international trade model. Twenty five equations were simultaneously estimated and validated as a system using three stages least squares. A 9-year baseline was estimated under existing projections and the impacts of the increasing rates of Mexican chicken meat imports from the United States were simulated and compared with the baseline.
    Keywords: Supply, Demand, NAFTA, International trade, Grain sorghum, Chicken meat exports, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98828&r=agr
  101. By: Bachev, Hrabrin
    Abstract: The dairy sector is among the most fundamentally affected by post-communist transition and EU integration of Bulgaria. This paper presents the dairy chain management in the country at current present stage of development. First, it analyses the state and forms of dairy value chain management identifying the dominant and prospective models of dairy chain management. Second, it outlines the features, factors and efficiency of a new business model of dairy farms inclusion in supply chain.
    Keywords: value chain management; market; private and public governance; dairy sector; Bulgaria
    JEL: D21 L11 O13 L66 Q18 L16 D23 L14 M31 O17 Q13 L23 L22
    Date: 2011–03–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:29813&r=agr
  102. By: Leidner, Andrew J.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.
    Abstract: The objective of this study is develop a theoretical model that can evaluate two types of public health expenditures on water-borne health risks: water-related municipal services, an ex ante preventative measure against water-borne contamination, and medical treatment, an ex post treatment of the water-borne pollutantâs harmful effects on human health. The modeled community can allocate resources in either centralized-municipal water-services, point-of-use water-services, or medical intervention, with expenditures subject to a budget constraint. The movement of a water-borne illness through the community is modeled with a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) disease framework. An optimization framework is developed, including a statement of the problemâs Hamiltonian and first-order-conditions. The first-order-conditions are discussed. Future work includes obtaining a numerical solution to the optimization problem.
    Keywords: water, public health, rural development, dynamic optimization, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98806&r=agr
  103. By: Kawata, Yukichika
    Abstract: Environmental economics postulates the assumption of homo economicus and presumes that externality occurs as a result of the rational economic activities of economic agents. This paper examines this assumption using an experimental economic approach in the context of regime shift, which has been receiving increasing attention. We observe that when externality does not exist, economic agents (subjects of experimemt) act economically rationally, but when externality exists, economic agents avoid the risk of a regime shift that would have negative consequences for others. Our results suggest that environmental economics may have to reconsider the assumption of homo economicus.
    Keywords: homo economicus; unboundedly rational economic agents; regime shift; experimental economics
    JEL: C90 D64 Q57
    Date: 2011–04–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:30016&r=agr
  104. By: Nambiar, P.M.; Florkowski, W.J.; Suh, Dong-Kyun
    Abstract: Using data from urban Korean women survey the study examines factors associated with the BMI >= 25, indicating overweight or obesity. Logit equation results identify low income, low education, household location and preference for convenience, sweet-tasting foods and home vegetable processing as characteristics linked to a high BMI.
    Keywords: BMI, Overweight, Korea, Woman, Socio-economic factors, Health Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2011
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98640&r=agr
  105. By: Georges Giraud; Cléo Tebby; Corinne Amblard
    Keywords: Wine, Knowledge-based economy, Consumer clustering
    JEL: D1 M31
    Date: 2011–03–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ceo:wpaper:29&r=agr
  106. By: Mekonnen, Dawit Kelemework; Fonsah, Esendugue Greg
    Abstract: Although this paper focuses on apple juice, a restricted version of source differentiated Almost Ideal Demand System (RSDAIDS) was used to examine U.S. import demand for fresh apple, apple juice and other processed apple. Apple imports were differentiated by type and source of origin and the RSDAIDS model was estimated after imposing the general demand restrictions of adding-up, homogeneity and slutsky symmetry. Seasonality and trend variables were also included on the model. The estimation results showed that U.S. demand for apple juice from China was price inelastic with relatively high expenditure elasticity. We believe the result partially explains why China managed to have a 60 percent import market share in the sub-market despite U.S. imposition of high duties on Chinese apple juice.
    Keywords: Import demand estimation, apple juice, RSDAIDS, Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2011–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saea11:98789&r=agr

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