nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2008‒12‒14
fifty-four papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
University of Verona

  1. Revisiting Malthus in Light of Agricultural Biotechnology By Mock, J.N.; Epperson, J.E.
  2. Attitudes of College Students towards Agriculture, Food and the Role of Government By Carreira, R.I.; Mane, R.; Danforth, D.M.; Wailes, E.J.
  3. INTRODUCING NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND MARKETING STRATEGIES FOR HOUSEHOLDS WITH MALNUTRITION: AN ETHIOPIAN CASE STUDY By Yigezu, Yigezu A.; Sanders, John H.
  4. Outcomes of Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Program in the United States: Trade Reform Act of 2002 By Bacho, Alan P.; Goodwin, H.L., Jr.
  5. The Impact of Land Fragmentation on Beef Cattle Inventory By Mervish, Philip; Anderson, David; Richardson, James W.; Outlaw, Joe L.
  6. An Economic Analysis of Corn-based Ethanol Production By Koo, Won W.; Taylor, Richard
  7. Factors Affecting Hay Supply and Demand in Tennessee By Bazen, Ernest; Roberts, Roland K.; Travis, Jon; Larson, James A.
  8. A Binary Logit Analysis of Factors Impacting Adoption of Genetically Modified Cotton By Banerjee, Swagata Ban; Martin, Steven W.
  9. SPATIOTEMPORAL MODELING OF AGRICULTURAL YIELD MONITOR DATA By Nistor, Adela; Florax, Raymond J.G.M.; Lowenberg-Deboer, Jess; Brown, Jason P.
  10. Stakeholder Preferences for Water Management Alternatives in the Red River Basin By Torpen, David R.; Hearne, Robert R.
  11. Analysis of the Soybean-to-Corn Price Ratio and its Impact on Farmers' Planting Decision-Making in Indiana By Ubilava, David
  12. Analysis of Irrigated Corn Production Adoption Decisions in Alabama By Novak, James L.; Nadolnyak, Denis; McNider, Richard
  13. A Sequential Rationality and Efficiency Test of U.S. Department of Agriculture Program Crop Price Estimates: Rice, Wheat, and Soybeans By No, Sung Chul; Salassi, Michael E.
  14. Valuation of Temp-Time's Fresh-Check® Indicator on Perishable Food Products in Belgium By Fortin, Corey; Goodwin, H.L.
  15. The Economic Feasibility of Producing Pasture Poultry for Limited Resource Farmers in Southeastern North Carolina By Ennis, Kelli N.; Jefferson-Moore, Kenrett Y.; Bynum, Jarvetta S.
  16. Valuing Recreational Benefits of a National Park in Andean Colombia By Alvarez, Sergio; Larkin, Sherry L.
  17. Accounting for (In)Efficiency in the Estimation of Time-Varying Returns to Scale By Shaik, Saleem
  18. Cost-Effectiveness of On-Farm Conservation Practices to Protect Playa Lake Hydroperiod in the Texas High Plains By Willis, David B.
  19. Chicago Board of Trade Ethanol Contract Efficiency By Funk, Samuel; Zook, James; Featherstone, Allen
  20. Does the MILC program Affect Milk Supply Response in Individual States of the United States? By Herndon, Cary W. "Bill" Jr.; Looney, John Mark Jr.
  21. Assessing Economic and Environmental Impacts of Ethanol Production on Fertilizer Use in Corn Production By Nehring, Richard; Vialou, Alexandre; Erickson, Kenneth; Sandretto, Carmen
  22. The Impact of the CIMMYT Wheat Breeding Program on Mexican Wheat Producers and Consumers: An Economic Welfare Analysis By Barkley, Andrew; Nalley, Lawton Lanier; Crespi, John
  23. Consumer Response to Food Safety Events: An Interaction Between Risk Perception and Trust of Information in the Chicken and Beef Markets By Shepherd, Jonathan D.; Saghaian, Sayed
  24. Do Farmers Hedge Optimally or by Habit? A Bayesian Partial-Adjustment Model of Farmer Hedging By Dorfman, Jeffrey H.; Karali, Berna
  25. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers By Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.
  26. Economic Value of Groundwater Resources and Irrigated Agriculture in the Oklahoma Panhandle By Almas, Lal K.; Colette, W. Arden; Adusumilli, Naveen C.
  27. The Economic Impacts of Direct Produce Marketing: A Case Study of Oklahoma's Famers' Markets By Henneberry, Shida Rastegari; Taylor, Merritt; Whitacre, Brian; Agustini, Haerani N.; Mutondo, Joao E.; Roberts, Warren
  28. Evaluation of Breakeven Farm-gate Switchgrass Prices in South Central North Dakota By Bangsund, Dean A.; DeVuyst, Eric A.; Leistritz, F. Larry
  29. Offsetting Behavior and the Benefits of Food Safety Policies in Vegetable Preparation and Consumption By Ndembe, Elvis; Nganje, William; Miljkovic, Dragan
  30. Comparison of Perception of Risk and Willingness to Consume GM Foods By Wachenheim, Cheryl J.; Nganje, William E.; Lesch, William C.
  31. THE ECONOMICS OF BIOMASS COLLECTION, TRANSPORTATION, AND SUPPLY TO INDIANA CELLULOSIC AND ELECTRIC UTILITY FACILITIES By Brechbill, Sarah C.; Tyner, Wallace E.
  32. Hay Price Forecasts at the State Level By Diersen, Matthew A.
  33. Economic Potential of Conservation Farming Annual Winter Forages for the Stocker Cattle Grazing Enterprise By Biermacher, Jon T.; Coffey, Chuck; Cook, Billy; Ford, Devlon
  34. Wine Grape Production: A Promising Enterprise for Small Scale Enterprises in North Carolina? By Jefferson-Moore, Kenrett Y.; Bynum, Jarvetta S.; Mosley, Jannety M.
  35. The Value of Regional Annual Nitrogen Needs Information for Wheat Producers in Oklahoma By Roberts, David C.; Brorsen, B. Wade; Raun, William R.; Solie, John B.
  36. PDA and Handheld GPS Adoption in Precision Cotton Production By Walton, Jonathan C.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.; Larkin, Sherry L.; Marra, Michele C.
  37. The Nitrogen Fertilizer Value of Baled Broiler Litter for Cotton Production in the Arkansas Delta By Kemper, Nathan; Goodwin, H.L., Jr.; Mozaffari, Morteza
  38. Valuing the Changes in Herbicide Risks Resulting from Adoption of Roundup Ready Soybeans by U.S. Farmers: An Empirical Analysis of Revealed Value Estimates By Sydorovych, Olha; Marra, Michele
  39. An Evaluation of the Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts of NSW DPI Investments in IPM Research in Lettuce By Orr, Leanne M; McDougall, Sandra; Mullen, John D
  40. The Use of Weather Data and Evapotranspiration Requirements to Estimate the Marginal Value Product of Irrigation and the Profit Maximizing Irrigation Level for Corn in the Texas Panhandle By Colette, W. Arden; Almas, Lal K.; Robinson, Clay
  41. Examining the Impact of the World Crude Oil Price on China's Agricultural Commodity Prices: The Case of Corn, Soybean, and Pork By Zhang, Qiang; Reed, Michael
  42. Consumer Purchasing Behavior in Response to Media Coverage of Avian Influenza By Beach, Robert; Zhen, Chen
  43. India and the Global Demand for Commodities: Is There an Elephant in the Room? By Michael Francis; Corinne Winters
  44. Changes in Agricultural Input Costs and Their Impact on Net Farm Income By Taylor, Richard D.; Koo, Won W.
  45. Consumers' Perceptions about Genetically Modified Foods and Their Stated Willingness-to-Pay for Genetically Modified Food Labeling: Evidences from Turkey By Karli, Bahri; Bilgic, Abdulbaki; Miran, Bulent
  46. Bankable Pollution Permits under Uncertainty and Optimal Risk Management Rules: Theory and Empirical Evidence By Julien Chevallier; Johanna Etner; Pierre-André Jouvet
  47. A Comparative Assessment of the Broiler:Corn Ratio and Its Impact on Broiler Processors' Profitability By Hamm, Sandra J.; Goodwin, H.L., Jr.; McKenzie, Andrew
  48. The Efficacy of the Grid Marketing Channel for Fed Cattle By Fausti, Scott W.; Qasmi, Bashir A.; Diersen, Matthew A.
  49. Hedging in Presence of Market Access Risk By Tonsor, Glynn T.
  50. Organic Premiums of U.S. Fresh Produce By Smith, Travis A.; Lin, Biing-Hwan; Huang, Chung L.
  51. Implications of Growing Biofuels Demands on Northeast Livestock Feed Costs By Schmit, Todd M.; Verteramo, Leslie; Tomek, William G.
  52. The Adequacy of Speculation in Agricultural Futures Markets:Too Much of a Good Thing? By Sanders, Dwight R.; Irwin, Scott H.; Merrin, Robert P.
  53. Nonparametric Efficiency Analysis for Coffee Farms in Puerto Rico By Gregory, Alexandra; Featherstone, Allen M.
  54. Genetically Modified Crops, an Input Distance Function Approach By Gardner, Justin; Nehring, Richard; Nelson, Carl

  1. By: Mock, J.N.; Epperson, J.E.
    Abstract: While the population of the world is continually growing, there are doubts that the food supply will be sufficient to keep pace. Although 14% of the world is undernourished today, an exponentially increasing population could be catastrophic if agricultural production lags too far behind. This paper attempts to forecast agricultural yield given the recent advent of genetically modified crops as a means to see whether this technology has the potential to help supply the world with food in the future. Through regression, a model was developed to make predictions of corn yields as a case study on how biotechnology might affect future agricultural production.
    Keywords: Yield, Future, Prediction, Model, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty,
    Date: 2008–12–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:ugeofs:45613&r=agr
  2. By: Carreira, R.I.; Mane, R.; Danforth, D.M.; Wailes, E.J.
    Abstract: In 2002 and 2007 we surveyed Agribusiness students€٠attitudes about agriculture, farming, food and agricultural policies. Responses were analyzed by year and student characteristics including farm background, citizenship and gender. Citizenship was a significant variable explaining differences in agreement with statements. Year and interactions with year were not significant.
    Keywords: agricultural policy, farming, logistic regression, student attitudes, Agricultural and Food Policy, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession, A13, A22, C42, Q18,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6806&r=agr
  3. By: Yigezu, Yigezu A.; Sanders, John H.
    Abstract: Many developing regions have excellent potential agricultural resources. However, historically population has become so concentrated on such small holdings that acute poverty and malnutrition now predominate. The food scientists€٠response to the chronic nutritional problem has often been subsidized bio-fortification with nutritional supplements or more recently cultivars with higher nutrient levels. Where much of the population is in this inadequate nutrition category as in highland Ethiopia, the supplements are neither financially feasible nor sustainable. The cultivars can provide a few critical nutrients but are not a comprehensive solution. To improve nutrition, it is necessary to increase income so that an increased quality and quantitative diet can be obtained. Here we evaluate a strategy to introduce new agricultural technologies where a central aspect of evaluation is combining the nutritional and income goals. This analysis is undertaken in the Qobo valley, Amhara state, Ethiopia. Using behavioralist criteria for decision making defined by the farmers, the effects of different potential combinations of technologies and supporting agricultural policies on the household nutritional gaps and farmers€٠incomes are analyzed. An integrated approach involving the combined technologies of water harvesting, fertilization and Striga resistance combined with improved credit programs has the potential to increase income by 31% and to eliminate malnutrition except in the most adverse state of nature (10% probability). Both the treatment of the nutritional deficits and the decision making criteria defined by farmers are expected to be useful techniques in other developing country technology and policy analysis as well.
    Keywords: Adoption, agricultural technologies, Striga resistance, inorganic fertilizers, tied-ridges, marketing strategies, inventory credit, nutrition, income, capped-lexicographic utility., Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, International Development, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Risk and Uncertainty, O13, O33, Q16, Q18,
    Date: 2008–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:puaewp:36813&r=agr
  4. By: Bacho, Alan P.; Goodwin, H.L., Jr.
    Abstract: More farmers and fishermen in the United States are facing global competition than in the last decade. The Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers and Fishermen program is made available to support the impact of declining domestic prices due to agricultural importation. As the program nears termination in 2007, there is a need to assess the outcomes on program implementation.
    Keywords: Trade Assistance, Agriculture policy, Trade Outcome, Farmer assistance programs, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, International Relations/Trade,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6466&r=agr
  5. By: Mervish, Philip; Anderson, David; Richardson, James W.; Outlaw, Joe L.
    Abstract: Many groups have discussed with alarm the impact of agricultural land conversion to non-agricultural uses. This research indicates little evidence that beef cow inventory has been negatively affected by land fragmentation. Average acres per transaction, total transactions, or a fragmentation index did not have an important effect on cattle inventory.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6816&r=agr
  6. By: Koo, Won W.; Taylor, Richard
    Abstract: A global multi-commodity simulation model was developed to estimate the impact of changes in ethanol production on the U.S. corn industry. Increased ethanol production under the Energy Acts of 2005 and 2007 resulted in a significant increase in the price of corn. However, for corn-based ethanol production, the break-even price of corn is approximately $4.52 per bushel with a federal subsidy of $0.51 per gallon of pure ethanol and $2.50 gasoline. With a corn price of $4.52, the economically desirable ethanol production is approximately 11 billion gallons. In order to produce 15 billion gallons of corn-based ethanol and to maintain the price of corn at $4.52 per bushel, supply of corn in the U.S. should be increased substantially through increases in corn yield rather than increases in corn acres. The increased price of corn leads to major structural changes in the corn industry in the United States as well as other corn producing and consuming countries. Corn production would increase in response to higher price levels, corn used for livestock feed may decrease, and U.S. exports decrease due mainly to a surge in corn used for ethanol production. This decrease in U.S. exports should be met by additional production in other countries. The increased price of corn also leads to increases in the prices of soybeans, wheat, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), and agricultural inputs, such as land value and cash rent, fertilizer and chemicals, and farm equipment. In addition, the current price of corn has resulted in an increase in the production cost of livestock. The increase in prices of agricultural commodities and inputs would cause increases in retail prices of food in the U.S.
    Keywords: ethanol, price impacts, supply, demand, econometric simulation, HFCS, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:6201&r=agr
  7. By: Bazen, Ernest; Roberts, Roland K.; Travis, Jon; Larson, James A.
    Abstract: Understanding the interactions between supply and demand for hay is important because of hay€ٳ significance to the agricultural sector and economy, and because hay is an important crop on highly erodible soils. As an example, Tennessee has the most erodible cultivated cropland in the United States (Denton, 2000), nearly half of the state€ٳ current CRP acreage contracts are set to expire in 2007 (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2006), and hay is one of the most economically important crops produced in the state (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2004). Cross (1999) attributed the upward trend in Tennessee hay acreage since 1980 to an increasing number of farmers who were searching for alternative production activities, such as hay, pasture and livestock, to replace row crops on erodible soils (U.S. Congress, House of Representatives and Senate, 2002). Hay ranked tenth in value of receipts in Tennessee at $49.25 million in 2006 and cattle and calf production ranked first at $500 million. Hay ranked second in value of production at $262 million in 2003 and averaged $248 million over a five period from 2002 €Ӡ2006. Underscoring the importance of hay in Tennessee was the state€ٳ national ranking of fourth in the production of other hay (excluding alfalfa) at 4.25 million tons in 2006 (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2007). To quantify these supply and demand relationships, one must understand the characteristics of hay markets. Markets are usually localized because of the weight and bulky physical characteristics of hay. Although hay species are not identical, in many livestock production situations most are close substitutes, with the possible exception of alfalfa hay. In Tennessee, alfalfa is a differentiated hay product used mostly by dairy and equine producers. Nevertheless, alfalfa constituted only 2.5% of all hay produced in Tennessee in 2003 (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2004) and its price tends to move proportionally with other hay prices; thus, for modeling purposes alfalfa and other hay can be aggregated as in Shumway€ٳ (1983) study of Texas field crops and treated as a composite commodity (Nicholson, 2005) called hay. In 2002, 47,000 operations within the state produced forage, while on the demand side, 50,000 operations were involved in beef and dairy production with another 24,000 equine operations (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2004). Despite the lack of national and state central markets for hay (Cross, 1999), buyers and sellers seem to be aware of the current prices in their area. Word of mouth, a hay directory website (Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation, 2005), and the Farm Facts bulletin (Tennessee Agricultural Statistics Service, 2004) are among the primary outlets for price discovery (Rawls, September 2004). Hay producers are typically assumed to be price takers (Shumway, 1983) because of the large numbers of sellers and buyers; nevertheless, search costs and price differentials can result from the lack of a central market. Even though hay and livestock producers have avenues for price determination in the short run, they have little information about what causes supply and demand for hay to change from year to year. The overall objective of this research was to illustrate how the understanding of hay markets can provide valuable information to hay and livestock producers and agricultural policymakers. Using the Tennessee hay market as an example, the specific objectives were to: 1) determine the factors that influence Tennessee hay supply and quantify their effects, 2) determine the factors that influence Tennessee hay demand and quantify their effects, and 3) briefly illustrate the importance of hay supply and demand information to policymakers. Estimating factors that influence hay supply and demand can help to provide hay and livestock producers with valuable information for making more informed business decisions and policymakers with insight into how proposed agricultural policies might affect hay and livestock producers. To accomplish the objectives, Tennessee hay supply and demand were modeled econometrically, and the coefficients of the models were used to quantify hay acreage, yield, and price responses to the factors that influence the Tennessee hay market. The results were then used to briefly illustrate the potential impacts on the 2008 Tennessee hay price from the retirement of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acreage in 2007. Hay acreage proved to be fairly unresponsive to output and input prices in both the short and long runs. The weak response of hay acreage to own and substitute crop prices may result from many hay producers also being cattle producers that harvest their own hay in an effort to guarantee a reliable supply of roughage to feed their herds throughout the winter months. They might be willing to give up potentially higher profits from a production alternative to avert the risk of feed shortages for their cattle. The hay price appeared to be responsive to real per capita income with a price flexibility of 1.55. This finding is reasonable because an increase in real per capita income results in more purchasing power for a typical household. As purchasing power increases, one would expect beef consumption to increase because beef is a normal good (Schroeder and Mark, 1999). Increased beef consumption would positively influence the derived demand for beef production inputs; hence, increased demand for hay. A weak response of hay price to the quantity of hay produced (HPRODt) could be explained by the hay market structure. First, some livestock farmers may produce large amounts of hay for their own livestock, much of which is not sold on the market. These farmers may be able to produce hay at a lower cost than market price, or they may be willing to forgo the potential cost savings from buying hay from an off-farm source to avert the risk of feed shortages for their cattle. Additionally, unlike the market for corn or cattle, the hay market is much less organized and structured. Farmers producing hay for the cash market have no nearby and convenient grain elevator or auction market at which to sell their product. Weak response to changes in hay quantity and price suggests that hay farmers may not be driven solely by the profit motive. Instead, other motives may also enter into their objective functions as utility maximizers.
    Keywords: acreage response, derived demand, elasticities, hay, inverse demand function, price flexibilities, yield response, Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, D,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6889&r=agr
  8. By: Banerjee, Swagata Ban; Martin, Steven W.
    Abstract: Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) data for 2003 were used to estimate two binary logit models for two definitions of genetically modified (GM) cottonseed adoption. Results indicate conservation tillage did not positively affect adoption of GM cotton with either of these definitions, while adoption of GM cotton in the previous year did. Refuge cotton also did not affect these adoption decisions for the study year.
    Keywords: Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS), binary logit model, conservation tillage, cotton, genetically modified seed, herbicide-resistant cotton, jackknife procedure, refuge cotton, stacked-gene cotton, technology adoption, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:37140&r=agr
  9. By: Nistor, Adela; Florax, Raymond J.G.M.; Lowenberg-Deboer, Jess; Brown, Jason P.
    Abstract: Replaced with revised version of paper 03/06/08.
    Keywords: corn, drainage, precision agriculture, spatial panel model, Crop Production/Industries, Land Economics/Use, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, O18, Q18, R15, R38, R58,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:puaewp:6717&r=agr
  10. By: Torpen, David R.; Hearne, Robert R.
    Abstract: Effective and efficient water management implies understanding the wants and desires of the human populations through its key stakeholder groups. As a valuable resource that involves many regulating and managing players, the Red River of the North basin is an excellent case for studying stakeholder preferences and presenting them to involved managers. The primary goal of this research was to analyze stakeholder preferences for hypothetical Red River basin fresh water management alternatives. Specific objectives included comparing preferences across key stakeholder groups and estimating residents€٠willingness to pay for additional water management programs. Initial experts€٠and focus group meetings were used to select appropriate attributes and levels to be used within a stated choice experiments analysis. The final list of attributes included: additional recreation opportunities, water supply augmentation projects, water quality initiatives, and the type of institution that would be trusted. An additional levy upon annual property taxes, ranging from $20 to $240, was used as the price of these additional programs. Mail surveys were sent to three main stakeholder groups: informed stakeholders, who had attended the Red River Basin Commission water management conference; decision-makers, including county commissioners and mayors in basin constituencies; and random residents. An overall response rate of 34% was achieved. One interesting result was the general homogeneity of opinions across stakeholder groups. A log likelihood test failed to reject the hypothesis that stakeholders€٠preferences were the same across groups. Results from the pooled nested logit model show younger respondents, males, non-farmers and those categorized as pro resource conservation in favor of additional water management projects. Initiatives that were favored by respondents included: phosphorous and nitrogen reduction and enhanced fishery management. Because the population of random residents did not demonstrate a preference for any additional water management option as opposed to the status quo, willingness to pay was not estimated.
    Keywords: choice experiments, stakeholder analysis, Red River of the North, stated preferences, water resources management, Environmental Economics and Policy, Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2008–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:36774&r=agr
  11. By: Ubilava, David
    Abstract: In Indiana agricultural land is used mostly for corn and soybean harvesting. Rotated corn is a common practice, but in recent years, essentially due to the ``ethanol boom'' and increased profitability of corn production, many farmers have switched to continuous corn. Corn price increase affects the soybean-to-corn (STC) ratio, however, it is hypothesized that over time market effects will be felt, and return the ratio to its stable range. The threshold autoregressive model is used to analyze the monthly time series of STC ratio in Indiana. Results suggest that exogenous shocks will not have permanent effect on the STC price ratio, but will require, however, a reasonably long time to die out.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6783&r=agr
  12. By: Novak, James L.; Nadolnyak, Denis; McNider, Richard
    Abstract: Expanding ethanol markets, abundance of water resources, and predominance of rainfed corn production in Alabama suggest possibility of irrigating cornfields. Numerical analysis shows that irrigated production becomes more preferable with higher corn prices and risk aversion. Adoption threshold is estimated at the price below its current level.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6756&r=agr
  13. By: No, Sung Chul; Salassi, Michael E.
    Abstract: This paper examines the USDA price estimates of rice, wheat, and soybeans and whether spot commodity prices reflect price information embodied in USDA estimates. Results indicate that the monthly USDA estimates are failed to meet a rationality condition. Rice and wheat actual prices marginally incorporate the information embodied in USDA past price estimates.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6814&r=agr
  14. By: Fortin, Corey; Goodwin, H.L.
    Abstract: Consumers are becoming acutely attentive to the factors that influence food safety and food wholesomeness. The food industry is well regulated, yet there is still illness that results from contaminated fresh food products. Recent food contamination outbreaks and concerns with how food is grown have created an almost hypersensitive food consumer. The TempTime Corporation is a leading international manufacturer in time-temperature sensitive indicators for fresh food products. This company's aim is to provide consumers with more information about exactly what happens to their product from the initial packaging of the product to the time of consumption. Their product, called Fresh-Check®, is about the size of a postage stamp, and is affixed to the outer packaging of fresh food products. It is used in conjunction with the use-by-date to ensure a safe and fresh product. This paper focuses on consumer perceptions of the Fresh-Check indicator in Belgium. We employed the contingent valuation survey method to capture Belgian consumer's overall perception, willingness to pay, preference, and acceptance for Temp-Time's Fresh-Check® indicator on fresh food products.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6766&r=agr
  15. By: Ennis, Kelli N.; Jefferson-Moore, Kenrett Y.; Bynum, Jarvetta S.
    Abstract: This study examines the economic feasibility of two pasture poultry production operations (pasture pen and net range) by limited resource farmers (LRFs) using the Net Present Value (NPV) method of analysis. Results of the NPV method illustrated unacceptable investments for both production operations.
    Keywords: Alternative Enterprises, Agricultural Prosperity, Pasture Poultry Production, Limited Resource Farming, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6831&r=agr
  16. By: Alvarez, Sergio; Larkin, Sherry L.
    Abstract: Protected undeveloped areas are an important tool for land conservation in developing nations. Efficient land allocation decisions and resource management requires knowledge of non-market benefits. Using travel cost and contingent valuation data from on-site interviews and secondary data on visitation, this study will value a national park in Columbia.
    Keywords: consumer surplus, non-market valuation, willingness to pay, zonal travel cost, International Development, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q24, Q26, Q57,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6732&r=agr
  17. By: Shaik, Saleem
    Abstract: This paper has a two-fold contribution. First, it examines the importance of accounting for (in)efficiency in the estimation of primal production function on the input elasticities, technical change, and calculation of returns to scale. Second, it applies a variant of the rolling regression technique to identify time-varying input elasticities, technical change, and return to scale. Empirical application to the Asian agriculture sector using Food and Agricultural Organization data from 1961-2005 indicates returns to scale are underestimated by the traditional pooled and panel models. Further, the time-varying estimates of input elasticities, technical change, and returns to scale indicate variations with each additional year of information.
    Keywords: Asian agriculture sector, time-varying input elasticities, technical change, and returns to scale, pooled, two-way random effect, stochastic frontier analysis, 1961-2005., Agribusiness,
    Date: 2008–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:44308&r=agr
  18. By: Willis, David B.
    Abstract: Estimating the agricultural cost of using buffer strips and/or furrow dikes as on-farm control measures to reduce sedimentation run-off from agricultural cropland into the playa wetlands of the Texas High Plains (THP) for the purpose of increasing/preserving playa hydroperiod and protect the unique playa lake wetland systems in the THP.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6753&r=agr
  19. By: Funk, Samuel; Zook, James; Featherstone, Allen
    Abstract: Firms producing ethanol may find management of the price risk associated with production of this leading alternative fuel a key factor to continued success. As with other agricultural commodities, the influence and ability of futures contracts to serve as a risk management tool deserves attention.
    Keywords: contract efficiency, ethanol, futures contracts, Crop Production/Industries, Risk and Uncertainty, Q13, Q43, M31,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6811&r=agr
  20. By: Herndon, Cary W. "Bill" Jr.; Looney, John Mark Jr.
    Abstract: The 2002 Farm Bill instituted a first-ever countercyclical milk price support program known as Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) program. Analyzing variables (cattle numbers, milk price, etc.) using regression analysis, this study found that MILC was statistically significant, but often had negative impacts, on milk supply response in individual states.
    Keywords: MILC, milk supply response, milk prices, Agricultural and Food Policy, Industrial Organization,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6782&r=agr
  21. By: Nehring, Richard; Vialou, Alexandre; Erickson, Kenneth; Sandretto, Carmen
    Abstract: The share of corn used in ethanol production has been grownig rapidly. USDA predicts that more than 30 percent of the corn crop will be used for ethanol production in 2009/2010. Expanded corn acreage contributes to the application of more fertilizer and is likely to introduce a larger volume of nutrients into the environment. This study found that an increase in ethanol production is consistent with a significant increase in quality-adjusted fertilizer use in selected corn states.
    Keywords: quality-adjusted fertilizer, corn production, ethanol, excess nutrients, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6736&r=agr
  22. By: Barkley, Andrew; Nalley, Lawton Lanier; Crespi, John
    Abstract: The increase in wheat production in Mexico€ٳ Yaqui Valley from the breeding and development of semidwarf wheat varieties released by CIMMYT is quantified for the period 1990-2002, and the costs and benefits of the wheat research program are estimated and evaluated using a two-region model of the world wheat market.
    Keywords: Public wheat breeding, benefit/cost analysis, agricultural research, wheat varieties, Crop Production/Industries, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6931&r=agr
  23. By: Shepherd, Jonathan D.; Saghaian, Sayed
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6822&r=agr
  24. By: Dorfman, Jeffrey H.; Karali, Berna
    Abstract: Hedging is one of the most important risk management decisions that farmers make and has a potentially large role in the level of profit eventually earned from farming. Using panel data from a survey of Georgia farmers that recorded their hedging decisions for four years on three crops we examine the role of habit, demographics, farm characteristics, and information sources on the hedging decisions made by 106 different farmers. We find that the role of habit varies widely. Information sources are shown to have significant and large effects on the chosen hedge ratios. The farmer's education level, attitude toward technology adoption, farm profitability, and the ratio of acres owned to acres farmed also play important roles in hedging decisions.
    Keywords: Bayesian econometrics, hedging decisions, habit formation, information sources, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nccest:37596&r=agr
  25. By: Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.
    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the average difference between farmer and market benchmark prices are sensitive to the market benchmark considered. Marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas is about equal to the market if 24- or 20-month market benchmarks are used, is slightly above the market if a 12-month price benchmark is used, and is significantly less than the market if the harvest benchmark is used. The sensitivity of marketing performance to the market benchmark considered is explained by the seasonal pattern of prices. While Illinois producers performed slightly better than their counterparts in Kansas, notable differences in performance across these two geographic areas is not observed.
    Keywords: benchmarks, Illinois, Kansas, marketing, performance, price, wheat, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nccest:37622&r=agr
  26. By: Almas, Lal K.; Colette, W. Arden; Adusumilli, Naveen C.
    Abstract: An economic optimization model was developed using available groundwater resources in the Oklahoma Panhandle to estimate value of water for irrigated agriculture in the area. The model will serve as policy tool to analyze alternative water management strategies and conservation programs to assess the economic impact of depleting Ogallala Aquifer.
    Keywords: Ogallala Aquifer, Irrigated Agriculture, Groundwater Conservation, Water Management Policy, Oklahoma Panhandle, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6714&r=agr
  27. By: Henneberry, Shida Rastegari; Taylor, Merritt; Whitacre, Brian; Agustini, Haerani N.; Mutondo, Joao E.; Roberts, Warren
    Abstract: The IMPLAN model is used to estimate total (direct and secondary) economic impacts of farmers' markets in Oklahoma's economy. The results show that Oklahoma farmers' markets generate a total gross sale of $3.3 million, with a total economic impact of $7.8 million.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6785&r=agr
  28. By: Bangsund, Dean A.; DeVuyst, Eric A.; Leistritz, F. Larry
    Abstract: Switchgrass, a warm-season perennial grass, native to the region, has received considerable interest for its potential role as a dedicated feedstock for cellulosic-based bio-fuels. This research examined the farm-gate price needed for switchgrass to provide per-acre net returns equal to those obtained from traditional crops in south central North Dakota. Future production costs for switchgrass and net returns from traditional crops were estimated for three soil productivity classes and also were developed to reflect the historical revenue and cost patterns associated with producers who are typically more or less profitable (i.e., average net return per acre) than regional averages. Prices were calculated using an annualized equivalent analysis of switchgrass production costs and net returns from traditional crops from 2008 through 2017. Switchgrass production costs ranged from just over $40 per ton on marginal soils to $34.80 per ton on highly productive soils. Breakeven switchgrass prices across the three soil productivity classes ranged from $47 per ton in the low productivity soils to $76 per ton in the most productive soils. Production costs for low-profit producers were estimated at $47 per ton, compared to the regional average of $37.50 per ton. Switchgrass production costs for the remaining profitability groups ranged from about $33.50 per ton to about $36.75 per ton. The breakeven farm-gate price for switchgrass ranged from $56 per ton for the two lowest profitability groups to over $94 per ton for the most profitable producers. A key economic criterion influencing the breakeven price for switchgrass will be the foregone net revenue from displaced traditional crops. On marginal soils, just under one-third of the breakeven price was derived from the level of foregone net returns from traditional crops; whereas, over 80 percent of the breakeven price was derived from the level of foregone net returns from traditional crops on the most productive soils. As net returns from traditional crops decreased, the more that breakeven switchgrass prices approached production costs for switchgrass. Under current conditions of high input costs, escalating transportation costs, and given the increases in net returns from traditional crops, switchgrass, as a feedstock to a cellulosic ethanol plant, will be more expensive than previously estimated.
    Keywords: switchgrass, production costs, farm-gate price, North Dakota, soil productivity, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Production Economics,
    Date: 2008–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:37845&r=agr
  29. By: Ndembe, Elvis; Nganje, William; Miljkovic, Dragan
    Abstract: Foodborne disease outbreaks have a tremendous impact on society, including foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, lost work time, and deaths. These food-safety events have a significant influence in shaping consumer's perception of risk. In food consumption, outbreaks of foodborne illnesses also have an effect on the development of public health policy. Due to these safety-related uncertainties in the food supply chain, various regulatory safety and health policies are implemented to decrease potential harm to likely victims. The expected effect of these food-safety policies forecasted in terms of reduction in foodborne illnesses, mortality, and food-related diseases may be overstated if consumer's offsetting behavior is overlooked. Reduction and in some cases reversal of direct policy effect may occur. This research tests the presence of dominant or partial offsetting behavior in the preparation and consumption of vegetables if a food-safety policy such as the Pathogen Reduction/Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (PR/HACCP) is mandated in the vegetable sector.
    Keywords: Consumer Behavior, Food Safety Policies, HACCP, Offsetting Behavior, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:6505&r=agr
  30. By: Wachenheim, Cheryl J.; Nganje, William E.; Lesch, William C.
    Abstract: The dichotomy between perceptions of the acceptability of risk associated with genetically modified (GM) foods and willingness to consume GM foods is investigated. Results indicate that some consumers are willing to consume GM foods even though they may perceive such foods as somewhat unsafe, with determinants such as self-perceived knowledge about the availability of GM foods and altruistic motives having positive and significant impacts on their consumption decision. Efforts towards decreasing perceptions of risk and ultimately increasing acceptance of, and demand for, GM foods should address issues related to their altruistic characteristics and outrage.
    Keywords: Genetic modified foods, multinomial logit, risk perception, willingness to consume GM foods, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Q19, D12,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:6876&r=agr
  31. By: Brechbill, Sarah C.; Tyner, Wallace E.
    Abstract: With cellulosic energy production from various forms of biomass becoming popular in renewable energy research, agricultural producers may be called upon to plant and harvest switchgrass or collect corn stover to supply such energy production to nearby facilities. Determining the entire production and transportation cost to the producer of switchgrass or corn stover and the amount available within a given distance of the plant will result in a per ton cost the plant will need to pay producers in order to be supplied with sufficient quantities of biomass.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Production Economics, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:puaewp:6148&r=agr
  32. By: Diersen, Matthew A.
    Abstract: Higher prices for major crops (e.g., corn, soybeans and wheat) have received considerable attention by analysts, researchers, and producers. A common perception is that acres can be readily bid away from other crops to quickly return to equilibrium price levels. Seldom mentioned are crops that do not trade on a national platform. Principal among these crops probably would be hay from alfalfa and grass. A balance sheet model is developed at the state level for South Dakota. As a state with typically large carryover stocks of hay and multiple markets served, South Dakota presents a stark contrast to states with more stable production, supply, and use. Several structural relations and equations are presented to forecast acres, supply, and price through an inverse demand function. A discussion follows on how to update the price forecast as additional information is obtained. Suggestions are also offered on extending the model to other states.
    Keywords: alfalfa price, feed demand, perennial crop, hay stocks, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nccest:37600&r=agr
  33. By: Biermacher, Jon T.; Coffey, Chuck; Cook, Billy; Ford, Devlon
    Abstract: The objective was to determine the expected net value of a no-till forage production and grazing system. Reduction in fuel and machinery costs offset the costs of herbicide application. The net value of the no-till system is $31 per acre, and is quite sensitive to relative differences in cattle performance.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Land Economics/Use,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6779&r=agr
  34. By: Jefferson-Moore, Kenrett Y.; Bynum, Jarvetta S.; Mosley, Jannety M.
    Abstract: We investigate wine grape production as a promising enterprise for small scale enterprises in North Carolina. Although results indicate that wine grape production is an ideal alternative enterprise for small scale producers, growers will have to wait at least 15 years to receive a complete return on the initial investment.
    Keywords: Alternative Enterprises, Agricultural Prosperity, Wine Grape Production, Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6838&r=agr
  35. By: Roberts, David C.; Brorsen, B. Wade; Raun, William R.; Solie, John B.
    Abstract: Crop producers are increasingly interested in reducing nitrogen use without sacrificing yield. Technology is available for precise application at the sub-field level, but adoption has been sluggish. This paper estimates the relative profitability of a field level annual predictor of mid-season N requirements and a regional predictor of the same.
    Keywords: nitrogen seeds, nitrogen use efficiency, precision agriculture, wheat, Crop Production/Industries, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6734&r=agr
  36. By: Walton, Jonathan C.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; Lambert, Dayton M.; English, Burton C.; Larkin, Sherry L.; Marra, Michele C.
    Abstract: This research analyzed the adoption of Personal Digital Assistants (PDA) and handheld Global Positioning System (GPS) devices in cotton production. Analysis using a logit model found that younger farmers who used a crop consultant, remote-sensing, variable-rate fertilizer, and reported greater yield variability had a higher probability of adopting.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6839&r=agr
  37. By: Kemper, Nathan; Goodwin, H.L., Jr.; Mozaffari, Morteza
    Abstract: The export of poultry litter by baling efficiently packages litter for long-term storage and transportation. Use of baled poultry litter to supply the recommended rates of P and K and a portion of the N rate appears to be a feasible nutrient management strategy for cotton.
    Keywords: poultry waste management, cotton production, fertilizer, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Q15, Q53,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6809&r=agr
  38. By: Sydorovych, Olha; Marra, Michele
    Abstract: A revealed-preference approach is proposed for the evaluation of the impact of changed patterns of herbicide use on RR soybeans. The results indicate that farmers consider herbicide safety in their herbicide choices and associate positive values with safety improvements. The aggregate welfare impact of reduced risk for the U.S. soybean farmers was estimated to be $90.3 million in 2001.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:8215&r=agr
  39. By: Orr, Leanne M; McDougall, Sandra; Mullen, John D
    Abstract: Research into IPM technologies has been conducted by NSW DPI for over 20 years. Evaluating the returns from investment in specific research and development projects is an important component of the NSW DPI science and research program. An economic evaluation has been conducted of IPM in managing invertebrate pests in lettuce in NSW. We found that there has been widespread adoption of IPM practices amongst NSW lettuce growers leading to a flow of economic benefits to the lettuce industry and the community. Important environmental and human health benefits were also identified. A benefit-cost ratio of 2 was calculated for the return to NSW DPI investment in lettuce IPM research which while satisfactory, is lower than returns calculated for other agricultural R&D. It does not include €سpillover€٠benefits to other States nor have human health or environmental benefits been valued.
    Keywords: research, benefit-cost, evaluation, IPM (Integrated Pest Management), lettuce, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Production Economics, Q160,
    Date: 2008–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nswprr:45631&r=agr
  40. By: Colette, W. Arden; Almas, Lal K.; Robinson, Clay
    Abstract: The declining availability of irrigation water from the Ogallala aquifer combined with increasing energy costs make irrigation strategies much more critical. Maximizing yield reduces profit by between $22 and $158 per acre depending on the combination of corn and natural gas prices.
    Keywords: corn, irrigation efficiency, water response function, evapotranspiration, Crop Production/Industries, Land Economics/Use, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6757&r=agr
  41. By: Zhang, Qiang; Reed, Michael
    Abstract: This study investigates effects of the world crude oil price on feed grain prices and pork prices in China. The results from time series techniques show the influences of crude oil price are not significant over the study period. The pork demand and supply result in the skyrocketing pork price.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Demand and Price Analysis,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6797&r=agr
  42. By: Beach, Robert; Zhen, Chen
    Abstract: Understanding consumer response to food safety information is important for quantifying consumer response to food safety events, predicting market impacts, and developing appropriate risk communication strategies. In this study, we present a methodology for analysis of consumer response to media coverage of avian influenza and an application using Italian data.
    Keywords: Avian influenza, food safety, Italy, meat demand, media index, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Q11, Q18,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6750&r=agr
  43. By: Michael Francis; Corinne Winters
    Abstract: After 10 years of impressive growth, India is now the fourth largest economy in the world. Yet, to date, India's impact on global commodity markets has been muted. The authors examine how India's domestic and trade policies have distorted and constrained its demand for commodities. They find that India's industrial policies have altered the expansion path of its economy, putting the service sector to the forefront and likely reducing India's demand for metals. Sector-specific policies, such as those promoting self-sufficiency in agriculture, have altered India's demand for food commodities and its supplies of those commodities to international markets. Recent policy reforms in manufacturing have boosted output, which coincides well with an increase in India's demand for metals over the past 4–5 years. Continued policy reforms are likely to diminish the distorting influence of India's domestic and trade policies. India's demand for energy and metals should rise as some rebalancing occurs in its economic structure.
    Keywords: Development economics; International topics
    JEL: F14 O13 O53
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:bca:bocadp:08-18&r=agr
  44. By: Taylor, Richard D.; Koo, Won W.
    Abstract: The recent rapid increase in commodity prices is not an unique event. It has happened several times in the past. Commodity prices have always dropped, returning to a more normal level. Production costs, on the other hand, follow commodity prices up but do not follow them down. Net farm income has increased rapidly in most commodity sectors of agriculture. However, production costs have increased substantially during the past few years. Those cost increases will reduce net farm incomes in the future if commodity prices do not continue to increase.
    Keywords: net farm income, production costs, gross income, Production Economics,
    Date: 2008–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:44821&r=agr
  45. By: Karli, Bahri; Bilgic, Abdulbaki; Miran, Bulent
    Abstract: We applied a multinomial logit model to determine consumer characteristics affecting three possible policy regulations that wanted to be implemented for genetically modified foods in Turkey. The study reveals that many household characteristics including food spending amount, education, gender, marital status, knowledge about food related policies and regional variables are key policy factors to choose regulation programs on GMO foods. People are more prone to implement compulsory policy on GMO foods than that of voluntary policy.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6754&r=agr
  46. By: Julien Chevallier; Johanna Etner; Pierre-André Jouvet
    Abstract: An increase in the demand for agricultural goods leads to the use of more intensive cultivation methods. Though Ricardo sees no difficulties in the intensification process, their existence is revealed by the possible occurrence of multiple equilibria. A general theory of intensive rent is based on a formal parallel with single-product systems without land.
    Keywords: Firm behavior, Tradable permits, Policy risk, EU ETS
    JEL: D21 D80 Q58
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:drm:wpaper:2008-25&r=agr
  47. By: Hamm, Sandra J.; Goodwin, H.L., Jr.; McKenzie, Andrew
    Abstract: Input prices for broiler production, particularly corn, are becoming increasingly volatile due to increasing competition for corn from ethanol and biofuels production suggesting volatility in poultry profits will follow indicator of profits relating feed input prices and broiler meat output prices, such as a Broiler:corn ratios. Total chicken exports, total chicken ready-to-cook production, number of eggs set, number of chicks placed, and cold storage chicken inventory are used to estimate. Utilizing a distributed lag model, seventeen years of data for three Broiler:corn ratios, broiler exports, egg set, chick placements, cold storage stocks, and ready-to-cook broiler production were utilized to estimate stock share price for four major broiler producers.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6665&r=agr
  48. By: Fausti, Scott W.; Qasmi, Bashir A.; Diersen, Matthew A.
    Abstract: Beef industry data suggest that carcass yield and quality grades have shown little improvement over the last six years. Trend analysis of grid market share and carcass quality suggests that grid pricing has not made sufficient progress in achieving the goals envisioned for it as a value based marketing system.
    Keywords: Grid Pricing, National Beef Quality Audit, Public Livestock Price Reporting, Beef Carcass Quality, Livestock Production/Industries,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6884&r=agr
  49. By: Tonsor, Glynn T.
    Abstract: Existing literature predominantly assumes perfect knowledge of production methods when deriving optimal futures position hedging rules. This paper relaxes this assumption and recognizes situations where producers interested in hedging may not know the exact input mix that will subsequently be used in their physical operations. This uncertainty is built into a conceptual model subsequently used to demonstrate the impacts of this risk on optimal hedging behavior.
    Keywords: distiller grains, hedging, market access risk, risk management, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nccest:37621&r=agr
  50. By: Smith, Travis A.; Lin, Biing-Hwan; Huang, Chung L.
    Abstract: The study uses the 2005 Nielsen Homescan panel data to estimate price premiums and discounts associated with product attributes, market factors, and consumer characteristics, focusing on the organic attribute for 5 major fresh fruits and 5 major fresh vegetables in the United States. The results suggest that the organic attribute commands a significant price premium, which varies greatly from 13 cents per pound for bananas to 86 cents per pound for strawberries among fresh fruits and from 13 cents per pound for onions to 50 cents per pound for peppers among fresh vegetables. In terms of percentages, the estimated organic price premiums vary from 20% above prices paid for conventional grapes to 42% for strawberries among fresh fruits and from 15% above prices paid for conventional carrots and tomatoes to 60% for potatoes. Furthermore, prices paid for fresh produce are found to vary by other product attributes, market factors, and household characteristics.
    Keywords: fresh fruits and vegetables, hedonic price, organic produce, organic premium, product attributes, Nielsen Homescan, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nccest:37626&r=agr
  51. By: Schmit, Todd M.; Verteramo, Leslie; Tomek, William G.
    Abstract: The relationship between complete-feed prices and commodity feedstock prices are estimated to analyze the effect of higher commodity prices on feed costs, with particular attention towards the price effects and substitutability of corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS). Assuming the historical positive correlation between corn and DDGS prices, each $1/ton increase in the price of corn increases per ton feed costs between $0.45 and $0.67 across livestock sectors. A negative price correlation would offset some of the cost increases, but under most scenarios feed costs are expected to be at or above those experienced in 2007.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2008–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nccest:37595&r=agr
  52. By: Sanders, Dwight R.; Irwin, Scott H.; Merrin, Robert P.
    Abstract: Long-only commodity index funds have been blamed by other futures market participants for inflating commodity prices, increasing market volatility, and distorting historical price relationships. Much of this criticism is leveled without any formal empirical support or even cursory data analyses. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission makes available the positions held by index funds and other large traders in their Commitment€ٳ of Traders report. In this research, we make an initial assessment of the size and activity of index funds in traditional agricultural futures markets. The results suggest that after an initial surge from early 2004 through mid-2005, index fund positions have stabilized as a percent of total open interest. Speculative measures€Գuch as Working€ٳ T€Գuggest that long-only funds may provide a benefit in markets traditionally dominated by short hedging.
    Keywords: Commitment€ٳ of Traders, index funds, commodity futures markets, Agricultural Finance,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nccest:37615&r=agr
  53. By: Gregory, Alexandra; Featherstone, Allen M.
    Abstract: Coffee production in Puerto Rico is labor intensive since harvest is done by hand for quality and topography conditions. Färe's nonparametric approach was used to estimate technical, allocative, scale and overall efficiency measures for coffee farms in Puerto Rico during the 2000 to 2004 period. On average Puerto Rico coffee farms were 46% technically efficient, 79% scale efficient, and 74% allocatively efficient.
    Keywords: coffee production, nonparametric efficiency, Crop Production/Industries, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6765&r=agr
  54. By: Gardner, Justin; Nehring, Richard; Nelson, Carl
    Abstract: Our initial findings indicate that GM crops do not contribute to the decline of traditional family farms. We make a significant methodological impact by using the within transformation to remove unobserved individual effects and demonstrate that the within transformation results in ML estimates that are identical to OLS estimates.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Genetically Modified Crops, Distance Function, Stochastic Frontier Analysis, Production Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods,
    Date: 2008
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeaed:6800&r=agr

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